One Detailed Negligent Discharge Story.

This is a discussion on One Detailed Negligent Discharge Story. within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; Found on the web and posted here for informational and educational scrutiny. I am posting it because I believe that it's a 100% honest account ...

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Thread: One Detailed Negligent Discharge Story.

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    One Detailed Negligent Discharge Story.

    Found on the web and posted here for informational and educational scrutiny. I am posting it because I believe that it's a 100% honest account and my impression is that the guy really needed to "unload" it out of his head.
    It's a detailed account of how the event occurred ~ AKA how it all "went down" and the resulting aftermath and his thought processes.
    I (of course) have left out the name of the person who originally posted it as the name is totally irrelevant to the scenario.

    Feel free to comment and critique it.
    All constructive comments are welcome.


    Saturday, after shooting my XD9 and Taurus 605, I field stripped the XD and cleaned both of the guns where I was shooting, but forgot my boresnake at home so I waited to clean the barrels.
    I loaded my SD magazine into the XD after cleaning and drying out with the help of a friend's air compressor, and went home.

    My mind was elsewhere. I almost gave up shooting when this happened. To disassemble the XD, you have to lock the slide back, (AND THEN unlock the slide lock/lever that keeps it in place) pull the trigger, and then the slide will come lose.
    Keep in mind, this should not be done with a magazine in place.. especially if you're careless/stupid and the slide doesn't quite lock.. had I not been in a hurry, like the dumba** that I am, I would've noticed the slide went back into place, instead of the one fluid motion of rack/lock slide, pull trigger.

    This may sound cliche, but it was the ONE time I wasn't being completely safe.. It went off; I didn't even notice what happened until I noticed my hand was bleeding. At this point, I broke down, started freaking out. How can I ever trust myself with a gun again?

    I was very lucky/blessed/whatnot in 3 ways :

    My mom was three feet away from me; we have a landing in our garage, and she was in the laundry room. Although I had the barrel pointed down, and in another direction, this could've been very bad in that aspect.

    We have a brick landscaping wall that stopped the bullet. It went through the landing wall, out the garage, and into the wall. I found the bullet, and it was little more than copper/silver foil at this point. If I hadn't had the barrel pointed down, it would've gone to the next door house.

    It didn't go through my hand, in fact, I have assumed the bullet never even touched my hand. It was muzzle blast. My hand was burnt pretty bad, and there was a big chunk of skin missing. There's a lot of powder embedded in my hand.

    This, to put it simply, humbled me. It scared me. I told my dad (in the moment afterward) that I'm getting rid of this gun.
    I still haven't decided against it.
    To do this, and to know what COULD'VE happened...
    Friends and family kept telling me "mistakes happen".. and I realize this, but this kind of mistake should NEVER happen.
    I know if I was the grandparent of the 2 year old that plays across the street, I wouldn't be saying "mistakes happen".
    If I was the occupants of the house that the bullet went toward, I wouldn't be saying that. I would say "
    I don't ever want that guy to have a loaded gun at his house ".
    I realize that's not very pro-gun of me, and that's blaming the gun; but in a way, it's not.
    It's blaming my carelessness.

    Of course I fully realize it wasn't the gun's fault.
    I have come to the conclusion I'm going to stay away from semi-autos.
    Not that I think I can be careless with ANY gun, I just feel more comfortable with revolvers at this point.

    I didn't go to the urgent care of anything on Saturday. It truthfully didn't hurt much at all, although it was pretty deep.
    It was numb, but I just went along with my day after cleaning it and bandaging it.

    On Sunday, there was a significant brown ring around the wound.
    I assumed it was a burn.
    Then I noticed all of the powder or whatnot under my skin.
    I figured I had better get this checked out.

    They cleaned it out, then told me they had to contact the police because it was a gunshot wound (even though it wasn't, but I understood).

    I am sitting in the room alone after.
    Two cops come in, and start grilling me for a half-hour.
    Not that I don't deserve it. The only thing that bugs me is they keep belittling me; that there's no way in hell that would ever happen to them.
    Well, that's what I thought prior to this. and once you feel too comfortable with your gun, and think you're the safest person around, that's when it bites you in the a**..

    It's easy to get carried away and start finding fault with them, but in all honestly, they were stern and I would be the same way. They did their job, and I deserved every bit of it.
    I told the cops I had considered getting rid of my XD, for some reason or another.
    One of them tried buying it off of me.
    He told me he had a Springfield 1911.
    I felt a little more at ease knowing I was in the presence of at least one guy who was interested in guns other than duty (which doesn't really surprise me considering we're in a fairly rural area).

    Basically, I was told they're going to send the report up north (Indianapolis) and they would decide at that point.
    He said they could either cancel my CCW permit, hold a hearing, or just pass on it (if they had a million other things to do).
    I was compliant and agreed with them on certain points, answered all questions, even some that didn't seem overly relevant, and while some of you may not agree with that, I didn't feel like I was "violated" or anything, and it all seemed within the scope of their job.
    They did come off as jerks at some points, but again, it's easy to become the victim whenever YOU'RE actually the one in the wrong, and they're just being stern to get the message across.
    I think the fact that I was compliant and obviously completely ashamed is going to look decent in the eyes of the Indiana SP.

    All in all I just got a tetanus shot, and some "anti" comments by the nurse ("Guns are no good, I don't allow them in my house") and the young doctor (who was wearing flip flops and wasn't much older than me), although they were nice people anyway.

    As for losing my CCW permit; I'd rather not, of course.
    I don't think I'm going to carry much for a while regardless (especially not if it's illegal).
    Again, I know this wasn't the gun's fault. I'm just more familiar with revolvers, so I'm going to steer away from semi-autos.
    It's easy to say this happened because of not able to see the gun is actually loaded, having to pull the trigger to disassemble the gun, having to rack the slide.. but it's just carelessness.
    It could happen with ANY gun, and it was a huge mistake that I am completely ashamed of, and haunts me.

    As for giving up shooting, I was just overreacting, of course.
    This doesn't change any of my political views on guns, because it definitely is an emotional thing, not a rational thing. I don't view guns as any more dangerous of an object, but I do think one can become too comfortable with them, and that's something to be avoided.
    I know the majority of people here are probably extremely safe, but I guess my point is, all it takes is one careless moment (and truthfully, this was the first for me when it comes to guns), and now I risk losing my CCW permit - not saying that I don't deserve it.

    I don't do much praying, but I sure did make it known I was grateful to whatever higher power hears me, that I was the only one injured, and barely injured at that.
    I don't think I'll be able to rationalize or forgive myself for this, and I'm pretty sure if either one of my grandpas heard, I would never hear the end of it (and not in a good-natured, feel good kinda way) as they have both been shooting for 50+ years, and have been very strict in teaching me safety.

    I'm just grateful.
    I'm pretty new with handguns, but I have always been safe and never took my guns for granted.
    Of course, this was never going to happen to ME.
    It's just a warning; there's a lot worse things that could've happened, but the feeling after this happened was pretty bad. I lost it for a minute.
    I've always considered myself very safe with guns, and I would be the one who would scold a friend for pointing an "unloaded" gun at someone, or shooting into a creek bed, etc. It's a huge ego blow.
    It tears you apart, and I didn't even injure anyone.
    I don't think I could handle that. I do know, though, about auditory exclusion or whatnot now.
    I don't even remember the sound of the gun going off.
    My ears may have been ringing, but the adrenaline kept me from noticing.
    Liberty Over Tyranny Μολὼν λαβέ

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    VIP Member Array artz's Avatar
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    ...to the person who made a mistake....
    You I.D.'ed your mistake. The best thing is no one was seriously hurt. You felt pissed, hurt, responsable, and remorse. I say you beat yourself up quite well. That should stay fresh in your mind as a lesson for the rest of your life.
    You might decide to use revolvers from now own, or until you feel secure in a semi-auto again.
    Chalk it up to another experience for your personal toolbox of life.
    Your experience passed on to another could save someone else's life. Hang tough....
    " Refuse to be a victim, make sure there is a round chambered ! "

    Just call me a pessimistic optimist !

    U.S. Navy vet 1981-1992

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    I hope he doesn't lose his CCW permit....it already was an expensive lesson learned. As for the LEOs--man, talk about picking over while the body is still warm. I wonder how many LEO NDs there are compared to non-LEOs--sounds kinda smug in my book.

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    Quote Originally Posted by artz View Post
    Chalk it up to another experience for your personal toolbox of life.
    Your experience passed on to another could save someone else's life.
    For some reason this reminded me of the old saying:

    GOOD JUDGMENT comes from EXPERIENCE.
    EXPERIENCE comes from BAD JUDGMENT.
    "Society never advances. It recedes as fast on one side as it gains on the other. It undergoes continual change; but this change is not [an improvement]. For everything that is given, something is taken."
    Ralph Waldo Emerson

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    I don't know how old this guy is... I get the feeling he is pretty young chronologically, but displays a high level of courage and maturity.

    I hope he stops beating himself up! It is a lesson he'll never forget and one that has scarred him.

    I do hope he is allowed to keep his CCW in this case.

    Bottom line, the weapon was pointed in a relatively safe direction which as pointed out in his post, could have been disasterous.

    I own a glock and an XD and because you have to pull the trigger just prior to or during disassembly I have always been extremely careful and certain that I know the weapon is unloaded.

    I remove the magazine and always place it somewhere other than right next to me on the table, rack slide 4, 5 or even 6 times then lock slide back, then always look into chamber to ensure I can see light coming through the bottom of the magazine well, then look at the chamber to ensure a round isn't hung in the breech from a faulty extractor.
    -Bark'n
    Semper Fi


    "The gun is the great equalizer... For it is the gun, that allows the meek to repel the monsters; Whom are bigger, stronger and without conscience, prey on those who without one, would surely perish."

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    I get the feeling this guy is young too. He did a good job on portraying his thoughts and getting the point across. It's always good to read these stories to keep the dangers fresh in your mind.
    I have an XD, which is my first semiauto. I double check the chamber too. I've gone to clean it before and forgot to take the magazine out, then realized it as soon as I racked the slide. It was a good reminder to me and it hasn't happened since.

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    This Is Extremely Interesting - To me anyway.

    I believe this story is extremely close to 100% how it happened.

    Concerning his statement on Auditory Exclusion. (at the end of his tale)

    HIS adrenaline could not have been elevated at the moment of his ND. He had a Total Surprise ND.
    In fact he was very probably relaxed and Stress Free the instant he ND-ed the trigger.

    Yet...he Does Not remember the sound of the gun going off. And I believe him.

    So his auditory exclusion kicked in the instant his ears picked up the sound having NOTHING to do with being pre-adrenaline "pumped" before the ND.

    In his case it was NOT that DANGER! - his senses were heightened - heart racing - "Fight or Flight" - endorphins released - adrenaline elevated - THEN BANG! - none of that in his case & yet he experienced auditory exclusion.
    Liberty Over Tyranny Μολὼν λαβέ

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    I really hope he eventually stops beating himself up. He clearly recognized his mistake and is probably going to be extra careful from now on. THe only issue I have now is his comment about staying away from semi auto's from now on because he's more familiar with revolvers. This folks, is a COPOUT! It goes the same way with anything else in life. Don't let it happen. How in the hell are you ever going to be familiar with anything if you never pick the darn thing up and practice. If you constantly push it away and hide from it just because you're more familiar with something else or afraid...you'll NEVER be familiar with it nor will you ever get over it. It's a weakness for some odd reason 90% of people have. Fight the fear. Fight the urge. Deal with the problem.
    "My God David, We're a Civilized society."

    "Sure, As long as the machines are workin' and you can call 911. But you take those things away, you throw people in the dark, and you scare the **** out of them; no more rules...You'll see how primitive they can get."
    -The Mist (2007)

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    OK, I'm ignorant. Why would his permit be revoked for ND? I understand calling the police..blah blah...but taking away a permit?

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    Glad you are ok, It's complacency. My 1911 rarely see's day light. I keep it oiled and on house duty. My mistake with it was so stupid, I can't remember what I did. No discharge though, just thanked the Lord. Remember your gun is never your friend, just slow down and think. Have good one.
    Listen, Think and React.....Nuff Said.....

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    You get tired, rushed and complacent... bang, ND.

    Luckily, even tired and complacent, most gun owners do have the sense to keep there weapon pointed in a safe direction, like the OPer did. I know that I have gotten tired and complacent and had a ND ONCE. And ONCE was all it takes to learn the lesson.

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    Senior Member Array Cap'n's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bark'n View Post
    I own a glock and an XD and because you have to pull the trigger just prior to or during disassembly I have always been extremely careful and certain that I know the weapon is unloaded.
    Well....I know I'm going to to get some major disagreement with this statement but, IMHO I blame the manufacturer of the Glock and XD just as much as an operator for this type ND. No gun should be designed in such a manner that the operator must first Pull The Trigger before you can disassemble the firearm for cleaning or inspection. This problem has caused many ND's by even the professionals (LE). Just about a month ago, two officers entered the cleaning room while chatting about a ball game. Both removed their mags and placed on the table. First officer pointed his Glock into a sand barrel and pulled the trigger to clear his gun. Conversation was still going on, all along, about the ball game. Second officer did not clear his gun in the sand barrel. Second officer started to disassemble his gun and noticed he had not cleared it in the barrel. He thought to himself, I know I ejected the chambered round and pulled the trigger. Shot the second officer in the leg!

    With this being said and many, many similar stories, your friend should not beat himself up too badly over his unfortunate mistake as this has happened to some of the highly trained.

    This is just a case of a design flaw that Glock and others just seem to ignore.

    This post is by no means a glock bashing, just stating IMHO - the facts!

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    Senior Member Array Andy W.'s Avatar
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    My auditory exclusion didn't work when I had my SAD (stupid ***** discharge). That was the loudest noise I've ever heard in my life, I was inside my store. Scared the crap out of me.
    America: Your government is not ignoring you, it's insulting you.

    The Bill of Rights: Void where prohibited by law.

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    VIP Member Array packinnova's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cap'n_America View Post
    Well....I know I'm going to to get some major disagreement with this statement but, IMHO I blame the manufacturer of the Glock and XD just as much as an operator for this type ND. No gun should be designed in such a manner that the operator must first Pull The Trigger before you can disassemble the firearm for cleaning or inspection. This problem has caused many ND's by even the professionals (LE). Just about a month ago, two officers entered the cleaning room while chatting about a ball game. Both removed their mags and placed on the table. First officer pointed his Glock into a sand barrel and pulled the trigger to clear his gun. Conversation was still going on, all along, about the ball game. Second officer did not clear his gun in the sand barrel. Second officer started to disassemble his gun and noticed he had not cleared it in the barrel. He thought to himself, I know I ejected the chambered round and pulled the trigger. Shot the second officer in the leg!

    With this being said and many, many similar stories, your friend should not beat himself up too badly over his unfortunate mistake as this has happened to some of the highly trained.

    This is just a case of a design flaw that Glock and others just seem to ignore.

    This post is by no means a glock bashing, just stating IMHO - the facts!
    WHOA! Ok, Did I just read that right? LE has a sand barrel for clearing...I thought you just made sure you were pointing in the barrel and then cleared it properly? Talk about bad habit forming! Eventually someone's going get shot in that department.

    Ok that starts a thought process....How many of you LEO's on here can answer this? Do all of your departments go through that same procedure? Is there a logical reasoning behind it? I'm just seeing this as an extremely dangerous habit building procedure.

    As far as the having to pull the trigger before disassembly statement ...Totally Agreed! I always wondered why they did that.
    "My God David, We're a Civilized society."

    "Sure, As long as the machines are workin' and you can call 911. But you take those things away, you throw people in the dark, and you scare the **** out of them; no more rules...You'll see how primitive they can get."
    -The Mist (2007)

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    WHOA! Ok, Did I just read that right? LE has a sand barrel for clearing...I thought you just made sure you were pointing in the barrel and then cleared it properly? Talk about bad habit forming! Eventually someone's going get shot in that department.
    It’s not just LE that does this. I was taught while in the Army to go through several steps to clear a weapon.

    1. Drop the magazine
    2. Pull back the slide/bolt to expel any round that maybe in the chamber
    3. point weapon down at the ground at an angle or into a sand trap and pull trigger
    4. put weapon on safe

    Which brings me to my own ND story and yup I felt pretty darn stupid for quit awhile after.

    Long story short it was the middle of the night and I was a bit more than half asleep. I had just got back in the house after checking on something going after the live stock. I started to clear my pistol out of pure habit only I did the steps like this:

    1. pulled back the slide to expel the round in the chamber
    2. Dropped the magazine
    3. Pointed the weapon down at an angle – pointed at my office chair- and pulled the trigger
    4. Woke all the way up and felt really darn stupid for having just killed my office chair.

    The only good thing that came out of that was that I was so drilled into pointing that weapon down that the bullet didn’t go through a wall or hit anyone. Well that and it was a darn good wake up call that maybe I was getting a little to comfortable around my pistols.
    “The will to survive is not as important as the will to prevail... the answer to criminal aggression is retaliation.” Jeff Cooper

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