Cleaning after range time

Cleaning after range time

This is a discussion on Cleaning after range time within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; How do you clean your gun after you shoot it? Do you just take off the slide and do a basic solvent/lube job? Or do ...

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Thread: Cleaning after range time

  1. #1
    Member Array broknindarkagain's Avatar
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    Cleaning after range time

    How do you clean your gun after you shoot it? Do you just take off the slide and do a basic solvent/lube job? Or do you completely break everything down and scrub it clean?

    My SW5906 has a pretty stiff safety...I decided to break everything down, and I found a whole lot of dirt and grime in places you wouldn't think it could get to. The safety assembly literally had layers of gunk on it. I cleaned it all, and now its much, much smoother.
    "The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing."

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  2. #2
    Senior Member Array sheepdog's Avatar
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    Unless you are an armorer or trust yourself to do so, field strip and clean as per the manual. One extra step is very well worth the effort....if you can do it yourself or have someone do it, you might take the firing pin out and clean the tunnel it rides in. I have seen some neglect in that area that leads to the gun malfunctioning and even bent firing pins. On the safety, when I take out the assembly, I clean it then polish it and the slide where it it mounted with a rag and metal polish (no motorized tools on a curved surface). I then use a tiny bit of grease on it when I replace it. Makes a world of difference in how the gun operates and saves blisters on the thumb.
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  3. #3
    Member Array Troy Price's Avatar
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    If it is one of my M&P's or my Glocks I just field strip it and give it a good claning. I occassionally blow out the frame with compressed air.

    If it is my 1911 it comes all the way apart. I have noticed a difference since I started doing this last year. When I break it down, before I put it back together I make sure all of the parts have a light coat of oil on them. I also pay special attention to the ejector, plunger tube (to make sure it isn't loose), the firing pin channel, and the extractor channel.
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    Member Array imatt's Avatar
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    Since I really enjoy shooting surplus ammunition - and most of the time it's corrosive - I really have to break down my rifles completely.

    As to the newer pistols (no surplus stuff), they get a good cleaning inside the trigger with the spray solvent - the gunk usually just runs right out. The rest of the pistol gets field stripped and cleaned like usual.

  5. #5
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    I'm trying not to be as obsessive as I have been in the past.

    Before I would take my 1911 down to the frame almost every time I cleaned it. I would practically do a white glove test before putting the thing back together, too.

    I'm EXTREMELY obsessive about my bore. If that thing isn't shining like a mirror it's not clear enough. I'll scrub it for an hour if I have to.

    I have noticed that the armor tough coating on my Wilson doesn't get very dirty, or rather, dirt doesn't seem to stick to it. I wipe it down with a paper towel and it's sparkling like new again.

    The other thing I'm trying not to obsess about is oil. I definitely used to oil my guns too much (this comes from helping my brother oil his guns for storage where we'd soak everything). I'm getting much better at that.

    So now, I do only basic field strip for about 1-5 trips to the range (unless I've shot some really dirty ammo), then I clean out behind the extractor and firing pin.

    After about 1000 rounds I'll do the FULL cleaning down to the frame. That's pretty much how I do it.

  6. #6
    Member Array OldMick's Avatar
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    I do a field strip and clean after every range trip and detail strip and clean for annual maintenance . On carry guns I also do a spring change annually; mag springs, recoil, decocker and SCL spring. Now there's anal for ya - although Sig recommends it.

  7. #7
    Distinguished Member Array Bob The Great's Avatar
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    Field stip, solvent, wipe till clean, then lube and reassemble. I don't see the need for a detail strip every time.
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    VIP Member Array aus71383's Avatar
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    I field strip generally, but will detail strip every couple thousand rounds.

    Austin

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    Member Array 1911packer's Avatar
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    I agree with Limatunes on the 1911. Field strip every 100 or so rounds. Complete disassembly around 1,000.

  10. #10
    Member Array 1911NM's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1911packer View Post
    I agree with Limatunes on the 1911. Field strip every 100 or so rounds. Complete disassembly around 1,000.
    +1 along with Lima and Packer although I am behind on my 1k disassembly
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  11. #11
    VIP Member Array friesepferd's Avatar
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    ditto

  12. #12
    Member Array broknindarkagain's Avatar
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    Like I said above, I took out my safety since it was kinda iffy. It was pretty filthy so I scrubbed it clean, oiled it, and it was 100% smoother and easier to operate.

    I then got bored and decided to do the same with the trigger, hammer, and firing pin. Now all together the gun feels like new, a good cleaning made a world of difference. My trigger pull is much smoother, both DA and SA....hammer is a lot smoother to pull back, safety isn't stiff anymore...

    This was the first time I ever broke down a pistol beyond field stripping it. I was kinda nurvous about doing it, but I was able to get everything back to normal. I tested it with a few snap caps and everything checked out fine.
    "The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing."

    Smith & Wesson M&P9c

  13. #13
    Member Array ttpete's Avatar
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    I clean as needed. More often if I'm shooting lubed lead bullets. When I shot .30 caliber high power matches with a Garand, I cleaned bore and chamber after every match, but nothing else until the end of the year. Removing the action makes the bedding looser every time it's done. I never had a malfunction because of this.

    Just a few thoughts about cleaning, things I learned over the 50 years I've been shooting.

    The M16 type toothbrushes are excellent. Especially the small brush. Brownells has them. Get a half dozen, you'll find other uses for them.

    Get some 6 inch cotton swab sticks from a surgical/sickroom supply house. They have wooden sticks and aren't flexible like Q tips. Break the sticks off the dirty ones, and use the sharp ends to dig out crud without scratching the metal.

    I use acetone or lacquer thinner as a solvent. Home Depot carries these, but make sure whatever is used doesn't react with any plastic on the weapon.

    I like plastic coated cleaning rods. Dewey makes the best. Aluminum rods will imbed grit in the metal and wear the bore. Use the best bore brushes available, brass only, no stainless. Most of the cheaper ones are really wimpy. A good brush will be really hard to push through the barrel. A Bore Snake is good for a quick clean.

    I have always used Hoppe's oil. Personal preference, it's never let me down. For slide rails, I use an extemely light Teflon loaded grease I got from a Ford parts department years ago. Slicker than deer guts on a brass doorknob....

    Another nice thing to have is a "Rig Rag". It's sold by Rig, and is a piece of sheepskin that is treated with Rig grease. It makes wiping a gun down before storage quick and easy. I keep one on the shelf inside the safe in a plastic bag.
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  14. #14
    VIP Member Array Cupcake's Avatar
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    I field strip and clean that baby good every time I shoot (pretty much all you can do with an XD). Then I have the urge to shoot it again to make sure that everything works. This requires another cleaning. It never ends.
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    VIP Member Array goldshellback's Avatar
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    I'm a field stripper kinda shooter myself. I break 'em down after the range EVERY TIME. Every once in a while, every few months, my firearms will get a "dunking" and good breakdown. I wanna take care of the tools that help take care of me.


    Quote Originally Posted by limatunes View Post
    I'm EXTREMELY obsessive about my bore. If that thing isn't shining like a mirror it's not clear enough. I'll scrub it for an hour if I have to.
    Lima......as a husband and a"field-stripper" I must ask, do you compare JD's house cleaning chores to you bores?


    I had too.....couldn't help it. I luv ya both!
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