Nurse Practitioner Asked Gun Question...

This is a discussion on Nurse Practitioner Asked Gun Question... within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; Thanks for the update. Whether or not he "gets it" may not really matter anymore. At least you've planted the seed that's caused him to ...

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Thread: Nurse Practitioner Asked Gun Question...

  1. #76
    VIP Member Array packinnova's Avatar
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    Thanks for the update. Whether or not he "gets it" may not really matter anymore. At least you've planted the seed that's caused him to step back and think about possible repercussions of giving unsolicited, unwarranted, and uninformed advice about subjects he has no knowledge of or authority in. Better still, if you happen to stay a patient and over a course of x number of years he sees the difference in you and yours he may be able to be won over in the future.
    "My God David, We're a Civilized society."

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  3. #77
    VIP Member Array MitchellCT's Avatar
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    I'd be absolutely shocked if he signs it.

    If the doctor were my client I'd tell him to refuse to sign it, give you a copy of your files and politely part ways.

    As to doctor-patient confidentiality, that's a legitimate concern.

    As in my profession, the client is the one I have a confidential relationship with, not the parent who is paying the bills.

    As an example, dad may bring his son in to discuss that DUI, but if I feel I'm not getting the straight story, I will send dad out of the room and talk to son alone to find out exactly what happened, and even though its dad's check paying the bill, dad doesn't get to know what his son and I discussed in confidence.

    Same with a doctor. You may be the parent. You are not the patient.

    If your daughter choses to share what she discussed with the nurse, that's one thing. If she prefers to discuss things in private, that's her right, and one that should be respected.

    You may pay the bill, but unless you have a HIPA release, you generally don't get to see the doctor's file.

  4. #78
    VIP Member Array Redneck Repairs's Avatar
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    MitchellCT While what you say is strictly and leagaly correct up to a point ( just where parental rights lie today is an open issue to be decided ) You did put up a strawman in arguing and attny/client relationship in a dui has anything to do with healthcare and parental rights there . Rather disingeniousness IMHO , and that is not a slam , rather a comment on the fact that a question from you to any defendant in a criminal case is an entirely seperate thing from a fishing expidition by a health care professional . I totally that any health care pro should be able to ask questions away from parents on cause to belive abuse is occuring . I however dont buy any arguement that they have a licence to conduct an inquisition on guns or any other pc matter . Nor sir do you lol .
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  5. #79
    Senior Member Array walvord's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MitchellCT View Post
    As an example, dad may bring his son in to discuss that DUI, but if I feel I'm not getting the straight story, I will send dad out of the room and talk to son alone to find out exactly what happened, and even though its dad's check paying the bill, dad doesn't get to know what his son and I discussed in confidence. .
    I would expect this at the police station, not at the doctor's office. If I get sent out of the room again, all members of my family leave immediately, period and end of discussion.

    Quote Originally Posted by MitchellCT View Post
    Same with a doctor. You may be the parent. You are not the patient.
    But I am the responsible party - oops, I forgot the state knows better how to raise my kids better than I - stupid me.

    Quote Originally Posted by MitchellCT View Post
    If your daughter choses to share what she discussed with the nurse, that's one thing. If she prefers to discuss things in private, that's her right, and one that should be respected.
    And this is where the breakdown in trust between all parties starts. Keeping secrets from your parents can lead down a bad road. The doctor just goes home at the end of the day and washes his/her hands of the matter. He/she is not the responsible party for the child. Can't have it both ways. When I was asked to come back in the room, they asked me about giving my twins some shots. Why didn't they just ask the kids if they wanted the shots, why ask me? And when it comes time to pay the bill, why ask me. Get the $15 bucks from the kids. You can't have it both ways.

    Quote Originally Posted by MitchellCT View Post
    You may pay the bill, but unless you have a HIPA release, you generally don't get to see the doctor's file.
    And this is where our country has gone down the rat hole. What happened to the 18 year old rule? Why not just let them start drinking at 14 too, heck, why not even vote. Seems like they are in charge of their health care, not me. Seems like doctors have crowned themselves the gestapo in charge of the "children".
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  6. #80
    Senior Member Array tanksoldier's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MitchellCT View Post
    You may pay the bill, but unless you have a HIPA release, you generally don't get to see the doctor's file.
    So parents have no right to know the medical condition of their children?

    I think I see another thing that is wrong with this country.

    Until the child reaches majority a parent is legally, financially and morally responsible for the behavior and welfare of the child... but has no legal right to know anything about the kid's medical issues. Nice.
    "I am a Soldier. I fight where I am told, and I win where I fight." GEN George S. Patton, Jr.

  7. #81
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    Monday morning quarterbacking: After reviewing your credentials, I would have asked the Dr how many patients died on his watch as an intern or resident--then highlight none of your privately owned firearms killed anyone. Ergo, you don't tell him how to heal people, he won't tell people how to handle firearms.

    Good job....
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  8. #82
    VIP Member Array Supertac45's Avatar
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    Sounds way too common of an occurrance today.
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  9. #83
    VIP Member Array grady's Avatar
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    Walvord, we need to talk. Just realized we are in the same county. Can I buy you lunch? I'd like to talk about things we have in common, like not appreciating doctors who stick their noses where they don't belong, and who think they know better than we do how to raise our children... and who think we have no authority in the home. I especially want to ask you about this particular doctor so (1) if it's my child's doctor, I'll know, and (2) so I'll never go to this particular doctor.

    I'll be having a talk with my daughter soon about doctor visits. Thanks for bringing this issue up.

    As for those who think doctors have more rights than I do when it comes to my daughter... not in this lifetime.

  10. #84
    Senior Member Array walvord's Avatar
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    I've probably beaten this dog to death, but one thing I would like to add is this - we get medical powers of attorney for our elderly parents so that we are able to cut through the red tape and care for them in old age. Since the kids seem to have all types of power over their medical care (and they probably don't even know they do) why not get a medical power of attorney for each of our individual kids. That way when we are asked to leave the room for those prying questions, just flash the medical power of attorney at the doctor and proceed into the room with your kids. Wondering if that would be an option. Just get it notorized like we do for aging parents.
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  11. #85
    Distinguished Member Array AutoFan's Avatar
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    I actually leave a medical power of attorney with the Grandparents when they are watching my son when both myself and my wife are out of town. Little did I know he has the authority to be treated all by himself [sarcasm]!

    Unless parents have been found to be neglecting or abusing a minor, parents have the right to be in the examining room at all times. As a matter of fact, most practices won't let a medical professional be in a room alone with a minor. There at least has to be a parent, guardian, nurse, doctor or advocate in addition to the medical professional. Too easy to be accused of untoward actions otherwise.

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