Chambering the First Round ... again

This is a discussion on Chambering the First Round ... again within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; On a couple of occasions, I have had bullets come unseated and shift, when doing cycling drills. Of course, these were professional reloads and not ...

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Thread: Chambering the First Round ... again

  1. #16
    VIP Member Array ccw9mm's Avatar
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    On a couple of occasions, I have had bullets come unseated and shift, when doing cycling drills. Of course, these were professional reloads and not done on high-end commercial machines. Myth? It happened. That said, I have yet to see it occur with any factory ammo I've ever used, despite some severe jams, clearing, ejection, cycling sequences.

    What I do: keep my primary gun loaded at all times, except during cleaning. If I cycle out a round from the chamber, it simply gets tossed into the box for the next outing to the range. Just takes one memory cell, to remember that. Avoids the whole possibility of shifting and becoming unseated, seating more deeply.
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  3. #17
    VIP Member Array Supertac45's Avatar
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    Usually no more than a couple of times. I have compared Hydra Shok and Golden Sabers in 40 and 45 after repeated chamberings and couldn't see any set back, but it only takes once to possibly have a problem
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  4. #18
    Senior Member Array Duisburg's Avatar
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    well being set back in the case the second time around could be due to some serious lack of ability with reloading ammo.

    as far as a clip goes, it does not have a spring, the gun does but I agree with Bud White in that compressing and decompressing a spring wears it out more.
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    Quote Originally Posted by fatboy97 View Post
    1. You might want to buy a caliper and check for yourself.
    This is a good idea and you can get a cheap one for a dollar $.02 +
    98 cents . All you need to do is set it for the rnd in question and if a new rnd out of the box won't slip in you had set back, so shoot it before it gets worse.

  6. #20
    Senior Member Array Fragman's Avatar
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    come up many, many times

    Time for a Sticky I think.

    In short,

    1) Bullet setback can happen and for many reasons, not just rechambering.
    2) If a spring is compressed, it can be compressed for longer than you will be around. As long as it doesn't rust, it won't weaken.

  7. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by nn View Post
    This is a good idea and you can get a cheap one for a dollar $.02 +
    98 cents . All you need to do is set it for the rnd in question and if a new rnd out of the box won't slip in you had set back, so shoot it before it gets worse.
    Good advice! I used a $100 caliper and I have yet to see a gun that won't produce set back.

    Now in some guns, the set back may be very small and hence insignificant. The reason I ran so many tests, is because I was unloading an M&P mag one day and noticed, not one, but two rounds with observeable set back - it was obvious.

    When I posted that on the M&P forum, I got a lot of flack until the guys that had never seen set back did some tests of their own. One guy came back and said, "If I lower the slide gently, the nose of the bullet will hang on the feed ramp and hold the slide open."

    I polished the feed ramp on my M&P and dressed the magazine lips both for round height and to remove any sharp edges or burs on the inside of the lips. That helped; the round no longer will hang on the feed ramp, but there is still set back.

    When the nose of a bullet contacts a feed ramp, it has the full force of the recoil spring and momentum of the slide slamming it into the feed ramp. It would be unreasonable to think that doing that will not cause a problem.

    Here's another interesting observation. I noticed that once the bullet moved by a certain amount, which isn't much, it set back further on subsequent cycles.

    I repeated the tests with Gold Dots and Hydra-Shoks. Gold Dots did a bit better.

    Let us not overlook the fact that Sig will not honor their warrantee if they find that a round has been chambered more than once. So if setback is a myth, Sig has sure bought into it.
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  8. #22
    Senior Member Array purple88yj's Avatar
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    I have seen some set-back in target loads more than I have in defensive loads. That said, WWB seems to have the worst set-back in .45.

    Because of the wicked pressure curve in .40S&W, if I see any set-back, I am cautious about shooting it. If it is too bad, I won't shoot it at all.
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  9. #23
    Member Array chris s's Avatar
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    We have to unload and load our guns each shift at work. IMO this is unnecessary, My carry gun stays loaded 24/7

  10. #24
    Member Array Locopelli's Avatar
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    When measuring with digital calipers, how much is considered excessive "setback".

    I just measured 12 rounds out of a magazine loaded .40 cal Gold Dot and most were a consistent 1.116 - 1.115. I did have one that had not been chambered and it was 1.114. Is two thousands excessive?

    I appreciate any insight on this topic.

  11. #25
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    I wouldn't think two thousandths would be a problem, with emphasis on "think", I really don't know. The setbacks I've seen have been as much as 0.100" (one tenth of an inch).

    The problem is that if a round(s) is re-chambered frequently, the set back gets worse. We have a common practice that seems to exacerbate the problem. A common loading procedure is to load a magazine, insert it, chamber the top round, remove the magazine, and add one round to top off the mag and reinsert it.

    Then when we unload, we remove the mag, and rack out the chambered round. Then when it's time to reload, we insert the mag, rack in a round, remove the mag and put that loose round in the top of the mag. Over time, depending on how frequently this is done, those two rounds get a lot of rechambering and the risk of set back goes up.

    Some people cycle rounds through the mag which is better, but in 15 or so cycles, the first round is starting it's second chambering cycle. So it becomes a matter, of how much, how often.

    As I mentioned before, I avoid the issue altogether by manually inserting a round into the chamber and then releasing the slide. That's perfectly acceptable for a PX4 and 92FS, and Beretta describes that loading procedure in their owner's manual. But not all guns can/should be loaded that way.

    The advantage of the manual method is that the round doesn't get slammed into the feed ramp so there's no set back, and the magazine can be left at full capacity and hence doesn't have to be topped off everytime you reload.
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  12. #26
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