Unexpected situation

Unexpected situation

This is a discussion on Unexpected situation within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; A coworker recently showed up at work and said that they had something for me and produced a toolbox containing a mostly completed tommy "kit" ...

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Thread: Unexpected situation

  1. #1
    Member Array pfcslr's Avatar
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    Unexpected situation

    A coworker recently showed up at work and said that they had something for me and produced a toolbox containing a mostly completed tommy "kit" gun. It isn't operational and appears to be missing a few pins and has no magazines. He explained that one of his friends had been working on putting it together but had passed away prior to finishing it, and that the man's wife had given it to him. However he is unable to own firearms and so was giving it to me. Here are my concerns: A) He lost his FFL for selling automatic sears 20 years ago, how do I assure that the weapon is legal. B) There are no readily observeable markings, ie s/n, maker, caliber. C) There is no way to verify the weapons history, is there anything I need to do to protect myself?
    Am I wrong to be warry of such gifts from someone I barely know? Several of my friends at work are in the same motorcycle club and they appear not to be involved with the "outlaw" clubs, other than getting permission to wear their colors and have chapters operating in whoevers turf.
    Thanks in advance for yall's help and advise,
    Searn


  2. #2
    VIP Member Array dukalmighty's Avatar
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    IIRC if the left side of the receiver has just onse selector for safe/fire should be good but if it has a second selector for single/auto not good
    "Outside of the killings, Washington has one of the lowest crime rates in the country,"
    --Mayor Marion Barry, Washington , DC .

  3. #3
    Member Array ouch's Avatar
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    The only way to really be sure, put in a box tape good send it far away from you (MN) and I'll take the risk away from you...

  4. #4
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    There are no readily observeable markings, ie s/n,
    Federal law requires serial numbers on frames & receivers.

    There is no way to verify the weapons history, is there anything I need to do to protect myself?
    Get rid of it.


    When you’re wounded and left on Afghanistan’s plains,
    And the women come out to cut up what remains,
    Just roll to your rifle and blow out your brains,
    And go to your God like a soldier.

    Rudyard Kipling


    Terry

  5. #5
    Member Array Southtexas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Captain Crunch View Post
    Federal law requires serial numbers on frames & receivers.



    Get rid of it.
    how exactly would you recommend doing that? destroying it? melting it down? Turning it in to LEO? Seriously anyone have any realistic course of action when someone "gifts" you a gun, I had a associate a few years back who said he didnt want a gun in his house anymore, (infants and wife thing) and wanted me to store or buy his, I didnt know the guy that well but I distinctly remember him saying he had done some jail time at one point and I was concerned I may be getting a "stolen or hot gun" so I just said I didnt have anymore room in my safe,, sorry.. is there a "safe " way to check on a guns history/background if you buy it at a gun show, or from some one?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by pfcslr View Post
    A coworker recently showed up at work and said that they had something for me and produced a toolbox containing a mostly completed tommy "kit" gun. It isn't operational and appears to be missing a few pins and has no magazines. He explained that one of his friends had been working on putting it together but had passed away prior to finishing it, and that the man's wife had given it to him. However he is unable to own firearms and so was giving it to me. Here are my concerns: A) He lost his FFL for selling automatic sears 20 years ago, how do I assure that the weapon is legal. B) There are no readily observeable markings, ie s/n, maker, caliber. C) There is no way to verify the weapons history, is there anything I need to do to protect myself?
    Am I wrong to be warry of such gifts from someone I barely know? Several of my friends at work are in the same motorcycle club and they appear not to be involved with the "outlaw" clubs, other than getting permission to wear their colors and have chapters operating in whoevers turf.
    Thanks in advance for yall's help and advise,
    Searn
    I would have been very uncomfortable with the situation and decline unless it goes thru an FFL transaction. Knowing what you know about the history of the prior owner, and suspicions about this gun, either give it back to the coworker after taking pictures and documenting the heck out of the incident, or preferably, put in a call to the local police ASAP. You don't know the history of this gun, or anything else about its chain of custody.

    How well do you know this person? Maybe you are being setup to reduce their pending jail time on related charges. Do look a gift horse in the mouth!


    As for others being associated with an outlaw club, but not really, but wearing the motorcycle club colors - it does not happen. Colors are everything, and wearing colors when not a chapter member will get you killed. Don't mean to be harsh, but these are not the kind of folks responsible CCW folks hang out with.

  7. #7
    Distinguished Member Array morintp's Avatar
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    This could be big trouble if it is a full auto and also not having a s/n. What would happen if you try to turn it in to LEO? Will you get in legal trouble for it? I'm sure it could easily launch some sort of investigation. Which would either get the OP or his friend in hot water.

    What would be even worse is if you try to send it to the dump and it gets found.


    editted to add: If his friend had bad intentions, such as getting rid of a gun because it was used in a crime, then landing him in hot water from my first paragraph would be a positive thing because he's not a real friend.
    64,999,987 firearms owners killed no one yesterday.

  8. #8
    Member Array BlackJack's Avatar
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    Actually it might not require a serial number if it is a kit. The receiver needs to be 80% (I think that is the correct percent) before it requires a serial number. There are several groups that make their own AK style rifles from kits without serial numbers by getting the receiver as a “flat” instead of a completed receiver. These receivers still need to be folded, welded or riveted, and heat treated before they are completed. This allows them to be un-serialized because they are not sold as a firearm. Of course, once it is complete, I do not think you can transfer it to anybody else because of that.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Array Skygod's Avatar
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    Sometimes gifts are just too good to be true. I'd be warry of every aspect that you have described.

    On the other hand, I'd not turn it in to police. One of the deputy's will just have himself a nice Tommy Gun and be smiling on sunday's at his back forty.

    It's odd that there is no serial number.

    Good luck.
    U.S. Army retired
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  10. #10
    Senior Member Array Skygod's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlackJack View Post
    Actually it might not require a serial number if it is a kit. The receiver needs to be 80% (I think that is the correct percent) before it requires a serial number. There are several groups that make their own AK style rifles from kits without serial numbers by getting the receiver as a “flat” instead of a completed receiver. These receivers still need to be folded, welded or riveted, and heat treated before they are completed. This allows them to be un-serialized because they are not sold as a firearm. Of course, once it is complete, I do not think you can transfer it to anybody else because of that.
    Yes it's 80% but the BATFE will support the notion that the hunk of metal is the 80% for legal purposes.

    This has been discussed before regarding making lower recievers for AR15's that are stripped. Even without a trigger or grip the BATFE accounts for the lower being 80% of the needed parts to qaulify as a firearm.

    Again, be careful with this. You could find youself being all over the net like others that we have witnessed.


    I've alway's said that if some SWAT guy leaves his AR or MP5 in it's case on the grass and I find it, then I'm keeping it, and it's going to be my secret. (YES, it happened here in Cincinnati)
    U.S. Army retired
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  11. #11
    Ex Member Array BikerRN's Avatar
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    There are a couple of ways to do this:

    Find a "Gun Buyback" Program, the one's the anti-gunners and Police Chiefs love, or get a lawyer. Have your lawyer turn it over to an ATF Agent for you.

    Personally I'd have the lawyer do it. You could send a PM to a Federal LEO, not with BATFE and he could arrange for your room and board for possession of the described item if you like.

    Let me give you an example: Mom finds drugs in daughter's room. Mom calls police to come and get drugs and take them away instead of flushing drugs down the toilet. When police show up, mom hands the drugs to said police. Police then place mom in stainless steel bracelets because "technically" she had the drugs in her possession. Mom is doing three years.

    Biker

  12. #12
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    I once took a job putting an old farm back into production after having been sitting idle for about 20 years. While cleaning out the barn, I opened the hatch to a grain bin (similar to a silo) and found marijuana plants hanging from the rafters. They were mostly stripped, but probably had a couple of pounds of buds, leaves and seeds still on the plants and on the floor. A hired man offered to "take care of it", but I immediately called the Sheriff's Department. The Deputy that showed up loaded it all into the trunk of his patrol car, thanked me and it was no longer my problem. I was on record for having turned this in, in case any more was found around the farm.

    I don't believe that the police would arrest you, or hold you responsible in any way, if you turned it in. They would, however, probably pay a visit to your friend. I would remove any fingerprints that I might have added to the gun and call the police to pick it up or give it back to the guy to dispose of in some other way. I would not keep it or in any way have it around my house.
    Bumper
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  13. #13
    Member Array pfcslr's Avatar
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    Situation resolved

    After discussing this with a gentleman on the phone he and his partner came over we all decided to declare it a abandonded "unknown firearm". they listened to the story of it's supposed history and after taking a few notes we all shook hands and they took it with them. I made two new acquaintances with whom I now have established trust. All is good again in my world, and I will never accept another "gift" from someone I barely know.

    Thanks for all of yall's advice!!!



    Searn

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by pfcslr View Post
    After discussing this with a gentleman on the phone he and his partner came over we all decided to declare it a abandonded "unknown firearm". they listened to the story of it's supposed history and after taking a few notes we all shook hands and they took it with them....
    Do these gentleman / gentlemen have any official authority to decide it's status? Like, some LEO agency?

  15. #15
    Member Array pfcslr's Avatar
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    Absolutely!!

    I wouldn't make my situation worse!

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