Cowboy Gunnin' II

Cowboy Gunnin' II

This is a discussion on Cowboy Gunnin' II within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; Ok, I think I have it narrowed down a bit to a 5 1/2 to 7 inch Uberti cattleman in .45LC. Anyone have any other ...

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  1. #1
    Senior Member Array Paladin132's Avatar
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    Cowboy Gunnin' II

    Ok, I think I have it narrowed down a bit to a 5 1/2 to 7 inch Uberti cattleman in .45LC. Anyone have any other suggestions or know anything good or bad about these weapons?


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    VIP Member Array cvhoss's Avatar
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    Do you reload? If you don't, I'd seriously consider going to 35/357 for your caliber. Factory 45 Colt is expensive.

    I haven't handled a new Uberti in a while (Uberti, Cimarron, Navy Arms) so don't know if they've changed this or not, but here's the one problem I've seen on several of them in the past (including the Cimarron I own).

    (part of this is speculation on my part, some isn't)
    Until the advent of Cowboy Action Shooting, most of these guns when they were sold were occasionally fired wall hangers. Because of this, Uberti had the habit of timing the guns closely so that the bolt just popped up into the lead-in notch so as to not touch any of the cylinder and create a "ring" on the cylinder. Because of this late timing (in the gunsmith trade they refer to it as a "late rising bolt"), the guns worked fine as long as you cocked them easily and not overly fast. But, if you're going to compete with the gun, especially a cylinder full of 200-250 grain 45 Colt rounds, and cock the gun quickly, it can lead to over-rotation of the cylinder and cause you to have to go around more than once to get all chambers fired.

    If at all possible, buy one that's in stock from a local dealer and that will let you slowly cycle the action. If, while slowly cocking the gun, you see the bolt pop up just inside the lead-in notch, you will probably have over-rotation problems if you cock it hard and fast. If it pops up before the lead-in notch you'll be O.K. for performance but it will leave a ring around the cylinder eventually.

    Lastly, remember that for safety's sake, these guns are 5 shooters. Load one, skip one, load four, cock and lower hammer. This leaves your hammer resting on an empty chamber. NEVER carry one of these guns loaded with 6.

    Hope that helps some.

    Hoss
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    Quote Originally Posted by cvhoss View Post
    Do you reload? If you don't, I'd seriously consider going to 35/357 for your caliber. Factory 45 Colt is expensive.

    I haven't handled a new Uberti in a while (Uberti, Cimarron, Navy Arms) so don't know if they've changed this or not, but here's the one problem I've seen on several of them in the past (including the Cimarron I own).

    (part of this is speculation on my part, some isn't)
    Until the advent of Cowboy Action Shooting, most of these guns when they were sold were occasionally fired wall hangers. Because of this, Uberti had the habit of timing the guns closely so that the bolt just popped up into the lead-in notch so as to not touch any of the cylinder and create a "ring" on the cylinder. Because of this late timing (in the gunsmith trade they refer to it as a "late rising bolt"), the guns worked fine as long as you cocked them easily and not overly fast. But, if you're going to compete with the gun, especially a cylinder full of 200-250 grain 45 Colt rounds, and cock the gun quickly, it can lead to over-rotation of the cylinder and cause you to have to go around more than once to get all chambers fired.

    If at all possible, buy one that's in stock from a local dealer and that will let you slowly cycle the action. If, while slowly cocking the gun, you see the bolt pop up just inside the lead-in notch, you will probably have over-rotation problems if you cock it hard and fast. If it pops up before the lead-in notch you'll be O.K. for performance but it will leave a ring around the cylinder eventually.

    Lastly, remember that for safety's sake, these guns are 5 shooters. Load one, skip one, load four, cock and lower hammer. This leaves your hammer resting on an empty chamber. NEVER carry one of these guns loaded with 6.

    Hope that helps some.

    Hoss
    Actually that will depend on how it is manufactured. If they use a transfer bar system, like Ruger and Taurus, they are 100% safe to carry with all chambers loaded.

  4. #4
    VIP Member Array cvhoss's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by archer51 View Post
    Actually that will depend on how it is manufactured. If they use a transfer bar system, like Ruger and Taurus, they are 100% safe to carry with all chambers loaded.
    Nope, he's looking at an Uberti Cattleman and unless they've changed very recently, they are hammer mounted firing pin, non-rebounding hammer. The Ubertis stay pretty faithful to the original design. Not safe with 6 rounds.

    Hoss

    added:
    Couldn't find an owner's manual on Uberti's web site but found on on Cimarron's (built by Uberti). From that manual:
    The old-timers used to say that the safest way to carry a single-action revolver was to load only five chambers and let the hammer rest, in the safety position , on the empty sixth chamber. Thatís good advice even today. It still takes proper care in handling and use by you, its owner.
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    I agree, if the gun has a hammer mounted firing pin it should be carried on an empty chamber. Not sure how close they followed the original design since they stray on caliber of the guns.

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    Senior Member Array Paladin132's Avatar
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    I've been cautioned about the spurred hammers, and agree... I had not heard that about the over rotation of the cylinder... Now I am worried I shouldn't get one... I'm not at all fond of the Ruger models, as they are pretty modernized. Hrmmm... Maybe I should just not get one until I can afford something pricy...?

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    You might take a look at the Taurus Gaucho line. MSRP is around $530. Not sure what you can pick them up for in stores. They do come with the transfer bar system. Available in .357, 44-40 and 45LC.

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    I really like the looks and features of the gaucho, and the price! Anyone have anything good / bad to say about them?

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    VIP Member Array cvhoss's Avatar
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    Are you planning on taking up Cowboy Action Shooting or are you just looking for something to have some fun with? Your plans will affect any further suggestions I might be able to give you.

    Hoss
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    Senior Member Array Paladin132's Avatar
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    No, not planning on CAS anytime soon, if I do I will get something for it. This is a fun firearm to reflect my past as a cavalry trooper and future as a member of the law enforcement community.

  11. #11
    VIP Member Array cvhoss's Avatar
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    In that case, I'd go ahead and take the chance on the Uberti. I'd have much more faith in the Uberti than the Gaucho. As long as you cock it at a normal pace, you should not have any rotation problems even if it does have a slow rising bolt.
    This is a fun firearm to reflect my past as a cavalry trooper
    Given that, I'd definitely suggest looking at the Cavalry Model. Here it is at Buffalo Arms. Can't remember if it was you or someone else that I already warned, but just in case -- avoid the Charcoal Blue finish. Beautiful finish but very fragile. If you're trying to stay semi-authentic, make sure whichever model you buy you get one with the Black Powder frame. This just means that it has a set screw in the front of the frame that secures the cylinder pin instead of the spring loaded cross pin of the smokeless frame, it doesn't mean you have to use Black Powder in it. The Black Powder frame also has a narrower V notch rear sight where the smokeless frame usually has a wider U shape. If you find the V notch too narrow, it can be opened up carefully with a file. I've done that to all of mine.

    The only problem with the Cavalry models is that they come with the 7 1/2" barrel which I'm not a fan of. You may like it. They are very muzzle heavy which is why I prefer the 5 1/2" barrel models the best of the three most popular choices (7 1/2, 5 1/2 or 4 3/4).

    Hoss
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  12. #12
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    No, that was me you warned! And I have avoided them, although they do look kind of nice. Thank you, I had wondered and kept forgetting what the black powder frame was because I keep seeing it.

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