Painting a Wood Stock from the Factory

This is a discussion on Painting a Wood Stock from the Factory within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; As many of you know, I am looking for a new stock for my Savage 111. I am wondering... if I sand down the finish ...

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Thread: Painting a Wood Stock from the Factory

  1. #1
    Senior Member Array McPatrickClan's Avatar
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    Painting a Wood Stock from the Factory

    As many of you know, I am looking for a new stock for my Savage 111. I am wondering... if I sand down the finish that is on my wood stock now, could I just re-paint it pretty easily?

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  3. #2
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    Array Captain Crunch's Avatar
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    You can paint it pink with purple polka dots or any color you want, if that's your "thing."

    But why paint it? I'm pretty certain your Savage rifle stock is walnut. Just refinish it with a quality stock finish product from Brownells.

    There are few things in the gun world more beautiful than a walnut rifle stock with a fine hand rubbed oil finish. It's a lot of work, but the results are worth it.

    Painting a walnut stock should be a crime.


    When you’re wounded and left on Afghanistan’s plains,
    And the women come out to cut up what remains,
    Just roll to your rifle and blow out your brains,
    And go to your God like a soldier.

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    Terry

  4. #3
    Senior Member Array McPatrickClan's Avatar
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    OK, here's what I am figuring out in my research. Rifles are basically a collection of important parts. The main ones seem to be:

    a) action
    b) trigger
    c) stock
    d) barrel

    So if I have a Savage rifle from say, 1975, I can use the barrel, action, anything from it that I want to in order to make a "new" rifle, right?

    My dillema is deciding when you buy a new rifle and when you just tweak the one you got. How is the best way to make that decision?

    I am not looking for a sub-MOA firearm.

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    Senior Member Array McPatrickClan's Avatar
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    What Kind of Wood is This?


  6. #5
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    Array Captain Crunch's Avatar
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    The stock looks like walnut to me.

    What exactly is the problem with your Savage as is?

    I guess I don't understand your question. I certainly don't see any "dilemma." If you're set on a new rifle, sell the Savage and buy a new one or trade it in on a new one.

    Or buy a new stock for your barrelled action.


    When you’re wounded and left on Afghanistan’s plains,
    And the women come out to cut up what remains,
    Just roll to your rifle and blow out your brains,
    And go to your God like a soldier.

    Rudyard Kipling


    Terry

  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Captain Crunch View Post
    You can paint it pink with purple polka dots or any color you want, if that's your "thing."

    But why paint it? I'm pretty certain your Savage rifle stock is walnut. Just refinish it with a quality stock finish product from Brownells.

    There are few things in the gun world more beautiful than a walnut rifle stock with a fine hand rubbed oil finish. It's a lot of work, but the results are worth it.

    Painting a walnut stock should be a crime.
    I don't think your reply could have said it any better.

    I would like to add though....

    It is possible to use tung oil only on walnut and buff it to a fine finish. For something more durable a water based rub-on Urethane can also make for a nice, run free finish that will be plenty durable.

    If the the stock is sanded, it may be discovered that it is not actually a one piece stock. The first step to restore a fine finish to walnut without a solid stain (no) sometimes requires bleaching.

    Since Walnut is a hardwood with open pores, the stock first needs to be filled with a sanding sealer if a very fine finish is desired.

    Personally I would use an AWI # 4 finish. This is a catalyzed lacquer and requires several careful spray applications. This type of finish cannot normally be achieved by a home hobbyist.

    I believe it depends on the amout of time, effort and craftsmanship one wants to put into refinishing a nice piece of wood.
    If you understand, things are just as they are... If you do not understand, things are just as they are....
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    Once you get the stock stripped - you can steam those minor dents to lift the grain back up by setting a wet cloth on top of them and using the tip of a very hot iron.
    Liberty Over Tyranny Μολὼν λαβέ

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    Senior Member Array jca1's Avatar
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    I have painted several stocks, this is what I have found. If you rub paint on like stain it takes better and lasts for years and years. Sand it down, then dip a rag in some paint and rub it on like stain. I did my SKS like this in black, looks really good. I agree that a stock or the whole gun for that matter looks best the way you like it.

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    Member Array flaboatbum's Avatar
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    My limited but happy method

    I have refinishhed 2 walnut stocks in the past year (Mini 14 and M1 Carbine) . Lightly dust sand with lite grit paper 220 or higher (after field stripping) Mask off with good blue tape. Wipe down with mineral spirits, wait 5 minutes until wood looks dry, then spray on MinWax Captains clear varnish while stock suspended vertically by string in a dust free area....outdoors works well. OR... If desired, rag wipe on (and off) a stain of choice after the sanding....wait 3 hours, then spray. Two coats looks great! Hold rattle can about 12" off the surface moving it constantly and don't try to do it in 1 coat....drips, runs, errors.

    If you don't want the high gloss look, use satin finish. Painting a walnut stick I would have to agree is a mortal sin.

  11. #10
    New Member Array Cascadedad's Avatar
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    Here is a link to another forum where I shared my first stock painting experience. Let me know if you have any specific questions.

    My 17 Paint Job - RimfireCentral.com Forums

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