Security Guard NOT a Gun Guy

Security Guard NOT a Gun Guy

This is a discussion on Security Guard NOT a Gun Guy within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; Once a month, I captain a team of volunteers from my synagogue to feed breakfast to the homeless at a local soup kitchen. We've been ...

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  1. #1
    Senior Member Array jofrdo's Avatar
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    Security Guard NOT a Gun Guy

    Once a month, I captain a team of volunteers from my synagogue to feed breakfast to the homeless at a local soup kitchen. We've been doing it for years without any problems in which I had to break up a brawl or anything, which is amazing, considering the almost animal mentality some of these people acquire living on the street, or due to their addictions or just natural mental instability. Anyway, something must have happened recently because now there's an armed guard, from a private seurity firm, on duty whenever a meal is being served. This morning was the first time we served while he was present.

    I felt him out a little, joking that with him there, I'm not the only Glock on the block. Then I added that I knew his sidearm wasn't literally a Glock. He said his was indeed a Glock. I said I knew it wasn't because Glocks have a semi-circular void space on the bottom of the grip behind the magazine floorplate. So then he agreed that his wasn't a Glock, rather it was a Luger! I thought he meant Ruger, but he said Luger a couple of times. Then he changed his mind again and said it was a Hi-Point. I also gathered that he never ever shoots at a range; he never "gets around to it." I guess the mere presence of his gun will keep people under control, but if he ever has to use it, it won't be pretty.


  2. #2
    Member Array gilliland87's Avatar
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    Not surprising

    That tells ya the security gig was just a job to pay the bills and the gun was just a requirement for the job. A scary prospect all around.

  3. #3
    Distinguished Member Array PastorPack's Avatar
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    Ruger, Luger, Glock, Block...whatever.

    Yikes, this guy sounds a little scary. Let's hope it's just filled with water.
    God is love (1 John 4:8)

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by gilliland87 View Post
    That tells ya the security gig was just a job to pay the bills and the gun was just a requirement for the job. A scary prospect all around.
    +1 you can say that again

  5. #5
    VIP Member Array automatic slim's Avatar
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    You might ask him if it's even loaded.
    "First gallant South Carolina nobly made the stand."
    Edge of Darkness

  6. #6
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    Hi Point with 9 X19 ? It said "Luger" on the ammo box.

  7. #7
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    What's scarier is that I once was selling a firearm to a police officer. His department required them to carry an off-duty firearm. While asking him the basic questions about what he wanted or needed he made the off-hand comment, "Man, my girlfriend's going to leave me."

    I asked him why and he said because she hates guns. He said she wouldn't even let him bring his duty gun into the house for weeks.

    I made the comment that with being a police officer it kind of comes with the territory and he said, "Yeah, which sucks!"

    I asked him why and he said, "It's just a job. I really don't care. I actually hate guns. But the boss says we got to have one, so we got to have one."

    I kept my mouth shut after that because a large part of me was really hoping and praying that this guy isn't the one down the street when I make a 911 call.

    I never thought even police officers could have that kind of mentality, but I guess it can be anywhere. I never assume that anyone carrying a gun, whether it be a civilian, a police officer or even military personnel, knows what they are doing and can shoot better than anyone else.

    Actually, after seeing both police and military in the range I used to work for, I KNOW some of them can't shoot for crap and really don't care.

    If the police and military can't be counted on to care, why should a security guard, making minimum wage and guarding a homeless food drive care?

  8. #8
    Member Array jbone's Avatar
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    Thats really odd. The security company I work for requires years of military/police background before they will let you be an armed guard. Im not saying that it necessarily makes them thoroughly knowledgeable but I imagine they would at least know what theyre carrying, etc.

    Who knows maybe this guy does have the experience he just really doesnt care.
    Note: This post may contain misspellings, grammatical errors, disorganized sentence structure, or may entirely lack a coherent theme. These elements are natural to the process of writing, and will only add to the overall beauty of the post.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Array jofrdo's Avatar
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    He hadn't shaved in several days, walked with a pronounced limp, and seemed to be a little slow upstairs, if you know what I mean. He's not the type you'd expect to hire from a LEO/military pool of candidates.

    Lima, I have to believe that most police officers do care, and realize the importance of their service and backup weapons.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Array Landric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jofrdo View Post
    He hadn't shaved in several days, walked with a pronounced limp, and seemed to be a little slow upstairs, if you know what I mean. He's not the type you'd expect to hire from a LEO/military pool of candidates.

    Lima, I have to believe that most police officers do care, and realize the importance of their service and backup weapons.
    See, the problem is that when it comes to law enforcement firearms are basically a symbol. Most of us won't ever shoot anyone. I use every tool on my belt more often than my sidearm. The most common being the radio and handcuffs.

    One never sees anyone posting on the internet about how its a shame that more cops are not radio people or railing about the fact that they don't understand the importantance of their radios or what their departments primary frequencies are. Same goes for handcuffs. I've never read a post running an officer down because they didn't know what brand of handcuffs they were carrying.

    Yes, I agree, firearms are important to cops (or anyone else) when they need them. Other than that, unless the officer in question is into guns, they are just tools. They are tools that are not often used.

    I'm into guns, but I was into guns before I was a cop, and I expect I still will be long after I've retired from policing. I'm not into radios or handcuffs. I can't imagine wanting to carry a radio around or listen to one after I retire. Other officers feel that way about guns.

    Policing is not about guns. It sometimes involves guns.

    I'd rather have an officer, who isn't into guns and is a less than stellar shot, with years of experience dealing with high stress situations backing me up than the best shooter on this forum who hasn't had experience dealing with high stress encounters.

    Is the story the OP posted kind of sad? Sure, but one can generally expect even less knowledge and concern about a tool from an hourly secuity guard than a non-gun LEO, who at least has attended an academy and goes through regular training on the subject.
    -Landric

    "The Engine could still smile...it seemed to scare them" -Felix

  11. #11
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    Very well said Landric. You put that way better than I have trying to explain the same thing for a long time here.
    "Just blame Sixto"

  12. #12
    Senior Member Array 2ndsupporter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Landric View Post
    See, the problem is that when it comes to law enforcement firearms are basically a symbol. Most of us won't ever shoot anyone. I use every tool on my belt more often than my sidearm. The most common being the radio and handcuffs.

    One never sees anyone posting on the internet about how its a shame that more cops are not radio people or railing about the fact that they don't understand the importantance of their radios or what their departments primary frequencies are. Same goes for handcuffs. I've never read a post running an officer down because they didn't know what brand of handcuffs they were carrying.

    Yes, I agree, firearms are important to cops (or anyone else) when they need them. Other than that, unless the officer in question is into guns, they are just tools. They are tools that are not often used.

    I'm into guns, but I was into guns before I was a cop, and I expect I still will be long after I've retired from policing. I'm not into radios or handcuffs. I can't imagine wanting to carry a radio around or listen to one after I retire. Other officers feel that way about guns.

    Policing is not about guns. It sometimes involves guns.

    I'd rather have an officer, who isn't into guns and is a less than stellar shot, with years of experience dealing with high stress situations backing me up than the best shooter on this forum who hasn't had experience dealing with high stress encounters.

    Is the story the OP posted kind of sad? Sure, but one can generally expect even less knowledge and concern about a tool from an hourly secuity guard than a non-gun LEO, who at least has attended an academy and goes through regular training on the subject.
    Nicely said!
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  13. #13
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    Also keep in mind here, that typically security guard job is a low level, low paying job. Granted, there are some very well paid security gigs out there, but you will rarely see those types.

    No offense to anyone here, it is what it is.
    "Just blame Sixto"

  14. #14
    Ex Member Array BikerRN's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Landric View Post
    See, the problem is that when it comes to law enforcement firearms are basically a symbol. Most of us won't ever shoot anyone. I use every tool on my belt more often than my sidearm. The most common being the radio and handcuffs.

    One never sees anyone posting on the internet about how its a shame that more cops are not radio people or railing about the fact that they don't understand the importantance of their radios or what their departments primary frequencies are. Same goes for handcuffs. I've never read a post running an officer down because they didn't know what brand of handcuffs they were carrying.

    Yes, I agree, firearms are important to cops (or anyone else) when they need them. Other than that, unless the officer in question is into guns, they are just tools. They are tools that are not often used.

    I'm into guns, but I was into guns before I was a cop, and I expect I still will be long after I've retired from policing. I'm not into radios or handcuffs. I can't imagine wanting to carry a radio around or listen to one after I retire. Other officers feel that way about guns.

    Policing is not about guns. It sometimes involves guns.

    I'd rather have an officer, who isn't into guns and is a less than stellar shot, with years of experience dealing with high stress situations backing me up than the best shooter on this forum who hasn't had experience dealing with high stress encounters.

    Is the story the OP posted kind of sad? Sure, but one can generally expect even less knowledge and concern about a tool from an hourly secuity guard than a non-gun LEO, who at least has attended an academy and goes through regular training on the subject.
    +1

    Very well said sir.

    Biker

  15. #15
    VIP Member Array Janq's Avatar
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    Jofrdo,

    Your experience mirrors that of reports by _many_ people as in relation to professional gun carriers from patrol LEOs to detectives to whatever position. They largely are no different as a population than any other as in relation to mindset specific to guns in general.

    In my own direct experience I have witnessed very similar to what you describe as in relation to LEOs either be it in courses I've been in.
    Most recently I was approached by a family friend who is a state police and who confided in me that he is completely rusty (his own words) having no like/care for handguns and that he is not required to train and thus doesn't. He'd asked me to help him run through some drills toward quals up coming which we plan to do.

    What you report is very much not unusual.
    Same as many don't know the first thing about their cruiser beyond make and model.

    Everyone can't be everything and of course not all cops are gun people nor car people. Same as there are commercial and military pilots who I kid you not do fully understand the basic mechanics and physics of flight as I also witnessed directly amongst pilot forums during the years long internet debate and conundrum for very many folks of could an airplane take off from a stand still/static position start if on a treadmill.

    - Janq

    P.S. - Of course an airplane can take off from a treadmill.
    Aircraft are propelled by _thrust_ and are not dependent on ground speed but rather _air speed_ to fly without any regard to it's wheels, which are nothing more than place holders.
    "Killers who are not deterred by laws against murder are not going to be deterred by laws against guns. " - Robert A. Levy

    "A license to carry a concealed weapon does not make you a free-lance policeman." - Florida Div. of Licensing

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