Gun Shot blow out kit

This is a discussion on Gun Shot blow out kit within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; So as not to continue to hijack this great thread mercop started, I started a new thread in Off Topic & Humor called Vintage EMS ...

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Thread: Gun Shot blow out kit

  1. #46
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    Array Bark'n's Avatar
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    So as not to continue to hijack this great thread mercop started, I started a new thread in Off Topic & Humor called Vintage EMS Equipment.

    I have lots of pictures and you can post your own, comment or ask questions.

    Seems like it could be a fun thread.... we'll see how it goes!
    -Bark'n
    Semper Fi


    "The gun is the great equalizer... For it is the gun, that allows the meek to repel the monsters; Whom are bigger, stronger and without conscience, prey on those who without one, would surely perish."

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  3. #47
    VIP Member Array KenpoTex's Avatar
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    Range Bag: CAT tourniquet, Israeli bandage, some gauze, triangle bandgage, etc.

    Car: "VOK" from Tactical Response Gear

    Work bag: more of the same...

    I also always carry a bandanna in my back pocket. It can be used either as a quick-n-dirty compress, knotted for use as a tourniquet (using a folder or other object as a windlass) etc. Maybe not as good as purpose designed stuff, but it's something I can keep immediately available without any hassle.
    "Being a predator isn't always comfortable but the only other option is to be prey. That is not an acceptable option." ~Phil Messina

    If you carry in Condition 3, you have two empty chambers. One in the weapon...the other between your ears.

    Matt K.

  4. #48
    Member Array Mountaineer's Avatar
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    Thanks to the OP for starting this thread, and thanks to everyone else that posted links. Up to now, I've only had band-aids, 2x2s, antiseptic wipes, etc.

    If we are going to carry around things that can make large, deep holes, the least we can do is carry something to patch them...

    I will be updating mine immediately.

    -M

  5. #49
    Senior Member Array Shadowsbane's Avatar
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    I keep meaning to get a few ACS bandages. Other than that I have some minimal gear, but not much.

    I also carry at least one EPI pen on me. Not exactly for gunshot wounds though.
    Now, we must all fear evil men. But there is another kind of evil which we must fear most, and that is the indifference of good men.

    www.Lonelymountainleather.com

  6. #50
    Senior Member Array mercop's Avatar
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    Glad this is getting the attention it needs, carrying a gun is all about survivability right? Then obviously you need first aid training and gear. You are going to need it long before you get a chance to whack a bad guy with your pistol. Personal protection and preparedness is a way of life, not a weekend hobby. - George

  7. #51
    Senior Member Array Tom357's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ccw9mm View Post
    For the average Joe (non-EMT type), should any basic ~40hr type course at a community college or other suitable source be sufficient for covering the handling of what such a decent non-EMT grade field/trauma kit contains?
    As a long-time EMT, I'd say yes, it will prepare you to use most of what is in those basic field first aid kits; but, there are things in those kits that your class won't cover, and to be honest, that you may never need. As others have said, you may want to supplement your kit(s) with the supplies and equipment you anticipate needing. All field emergency medical care, whether you are a Paramagic, EMT, or an average Joe, starts with basic first aid.

    I would encourage everyone to take a basic first aid course, at least, that also certifies them in CPR and use of the AED. An advanced first aid course would be better. If your community college doesn't offer courses, the Red Cross often does. Ideally, if your community uses volunteer rescue squads, I'd encourage you to consider becoming a volunteer EMT in your community. The skills are useful, the classes are usually free, I've never seen a rescue squad that didn't need more volunteers, and being there for others is a priceless service to your community.

    If you're dealing with a gunshot wound, you will need to activate EMS and provide basic first aid - manage the airway, control the bleeding, and keep the heart going - until EMS arrives. So, a basic first aid course will give you the skills you are likely to need, until someone with more advanced skills and equipment arrives to take over and get the injured to the hospital. This could range anywhere from a few minutes in the city or suburbs, to an hour or more in the country.

    If you are in a rural area, or go into remote wilderness, I'd encourage you to take a more advanced course than basic first aid. You may need to take care of yourself or someone else for an extended period of time, until help arrives, and having more knowledge and a wider skillset would serve you well. It might also make you change the stocking of your kits.

    My range kit is geared toward firearm-related injuries, including gunshot wounds, hammer and slide bites, eye injuries, and basic cuts and scratches. I stocked my own, using a ballistic nylon backpack first aid bag from back when REI sold them empty or stocked. Although not as compact as some, it is sufficient without being excessive. I keep a more complete jump kit that I put in the car, when I go anywhere, for a wider range of first aid needs.
    - Tom
    You have the power to donate life.

  8. #52
    Senior Member Array mercop's Avatar
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    Excellent advice. Thanks for contributing.- George

  9. #53
    Senior Member Array mercop's Avatar
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    Next year will will be adding a trauma management course to every class. It will not teach you to be a PJ but rather how do first do no damage and then manage a trauma victim until EMS arrives ,5-8 minutes. This will be done with the contents on the TIM (Traumatic Injury Management) kit we are putting together. Whether someone falls through a glass door or shot, you need to be able to deal with it while everyone else is hand wringing.- George

  10. #54
    VIP Member Array chiefjason's Avatar
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    A couple of things to think about if you are looking for a class. There is a course called Wilderness First Responder, that has some great info. It is geared towards first aid outside of an area with fast EMS response. Another option, and maybe a step up in the cool factor, is the National Ski Patrol Outdoor Emergency Care Technician. You can hook up with a local ski area and Volunteer on their patrol. They have yearly refreshers that are required to keep the certification up. It's a great certification, unfortunately I let mine lapse. But the info is still with me.

    If you look for those course, check community colleges around ski areas or schools that offer outdoor ed classes. Wilderness Medical Associates runs a lot of the WFR classes in different areas around the country.

    After one of the other threads, or maybe this one. I ran through all my first aid stuff that was stashed in boxes. Divvied it up into a few bags and threw them in my cars. Unfortunately, my ski patrol vest full of goodies was stolen out of my tool box over the summer. They got my good CPR mask and my sam splint plus all the assorted stuff. GRRRR

    Now for the dark first aid humor. I had the pleasure of sitting in on a conference lecture with Dr. William Forgey. He was talking about CPR in a wilderness setting and mentioned that occasionally CPR might not even need to be started. Of course in a room full of hot shot college kids somebody had to try to prove him wrong. So someone stated that they could not think of a situation where CPR would be contraindicated. Without missing a beat, Doc Forgey responded, "Decapitation comes to mind." The kid did not open his mouth the rest of the lecture.

  11. #55
    Member Array Bob F.'s Avatar
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    Joining in kinda late. Was a Nat'l Reg Paramedic for several yrs. Now an ER Nurse, ACLS, TNCC, etc. but primarily do triage. What's the price on those TMP's in the 3rd or 4th post? Haven't gotten a Gall's catalog lately; used to do a lot of the ordering for the FD/EMS.

    I have a good First Aid Kit, homemade, general purpose, in my primary vehicle and house. The vehicle's within feet at the range. but the EMS response is 15-45 minutes, depending upon whether the nearset station is available and if they have "local" boys on station. Cell service is spotty there. Used to carry the range's GPS co-ords in my wallet, probably should have smoke, too. Probably couldn't get a dust off launch on my request anyway.

    Thanks for the thread, maybe get a few of us to get off our butts and get prepared!

    Stay safe.
    Bob

  12. #56
    Senior Member Array mercop's Avatar
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    A good example of how people that should know better don't.

    The other day I got a call from school that my son had a seizure in gym class and was being transported to the hospital by EMS. He had no history.

    During gym class they were cleaning up when the gym teacher turned around and saw Frank on the floor in a "full body seizure". He called a medical emergency and the principle and nurse came. He was unresponsive and nobody saw him fall. EMS transported him. Several mistakes were made.

    First of all nobody timed the seizure. This is very important especially for someone with no history. Apparently nobody saw him fall, so either he seized and fell, or fell and seized. Either way he should have been placed on a backboard with a cervical collar and he was not. During a medical emergency the nurse should have pulled his information card and seen that he had no history of seizure activity. In my opinion this would have screamed possible closed head injury to a juvenile and required Advanced Life Support and not Basic Life Support that was dispatched.

    Further investigation revealed that he seized, fell to the floor and struck his head, luckily only causing a small bump. Long story longer he is now considered to be epileptic (anyone who has had more than one non trauma induced seizure in their life) he has now had three and is on antiseizure meds. He scared the crap out of us but is no worse for the wear.

    Just like with everything else, knowledge and training over tools. People screwed up and it still all worked out. I will be having some discussions with certain individuals next week.- George

  13. #57
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    Lightbulb ?Hello? ?Hello? Anyone Home?

    This thread has given me pause. A long pause. Thanks to all contributors, and now for the rest of the story.............

    Nancy and I began shooting in N. Texas, at a range in a city with a Level IV Trauma unit within a quick drive. The indoor range had a RO and emergency equipment and a lot of capability in addition to being close to plenty of hospitals and a first class ER.

    Additionally, we had personal boo-boo bags with the typical BSA / GSA stuff in the range bags and cars, as well as at home. We knew how to use them, and how to improvise if needed, and had had BSA / GSA First Aid and leader training, etc. Since we aren't hunters though, all weapons work was at the range.

    So fast forward a couple of years..........we now live 15-30 minutes from the closest town (without any medical facilities) in good weather. We're 30-45 minutes from a local hospital with Level II or III capabilities, but with ER Docs on site 24/7. We shoot in a section of the National Forest at least an hour from any town, and outside of any cellular coverage. We ride our horses in National Forest at least an hour if not two from any town - during hunting season.............with Orange Safety Vests.........but without any cell coverage.........

    The EMT's here, from what we understand, are first class though, since the rides down the hill are pretty long............

    But........We still carry the BSA / GSA boo-boo bags. Dah!!!!!!!!!!!

    Ya'll were a well deserved and well needed kick in the posterior to think a wee bit!


    Resolution: EMT training - 40 hours minimum for both of us - and advanced bags, and keeping current.

    Thank ya'll! I am very grateful now, and if I ever need what my wife and I are going to acquire, we'll be in tears!
    Richard

    NRA Life Member

    "But if they don't exist, how can a man see them?"

    "You may think I'm pompous, but actually I'm pedantic... let me explain the difference."

    "Carry the battle to them. Don't let them bring it to you. Put them on the defensive and don't ever apologize for anything."

  14. #58
    Member Array ScubaDuba's Avatar
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    Paramedic 15 years, 2 tours in Iraq.

    I have an israeli dressing, a few 4x4's, and a roll of coban. I also keep some latex gloves, because if someone is seriously injured at the range, I will probably help them, but not without gloves. When I'm hunting, I usually keep an israeli 2 4x4s and a roll of coban in my vest. IMHO anything more is overkill.

  15. #59
    Senior Member Array mercop's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ScubaDuba View Post
    Paramedic 15 years, 2 tours in Iraq.

    I have an israeli dressing, a few 4x4's, and a roll of coban. I also keep some latex gloves, because if someone is seriously injured at the range, I will probably help them, but not without gloves. When I'm hunting, I usually keep an israeli 2 4x4s and a roll of coban in my vest. IMHO anything more is overkill.

    The more you know, the less you need.

    Air goes in and out, blood goes round and round. Any deviation is bad:)

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