Got asked the Gun In The House ? today - Page 2

Got asked the Gun In The House ? today

This is a discussion on Got asked the Gun In The House ? today within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; Originally Posted by Ram Rod I take a yearly hearing test at my company given by a contractor. Their questionnaire had a couple of questions ...

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  1. #16
    VIP Member Array David in FL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ram Rod View Post
    I take a yearly hearing test at my company given by a contractor. Their questionnaire had a couple of questions I didn't much care for or answer about shooting guns. I let them know right off this was not pertinent information and frankly none of their business. The sign up sheets would also lay around on supervisors' desks the previous week with everyone's social security numbers in the open until the paperwork was given to the employee for the test. They don't do either of these things anymore. Now we just go and give our name when entering the testing van.
    I suspect that the question prior to a hearing test has more to do with any potential hearing issues that they might want to pay particular attention to if someone is routinely exposed to loud noises such as gunfire...... As such, it might very well have so medical importance.
    "Far better it is to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs, even though checkered by failure than to rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy much nor suffer much, because they live in a grey twilight that knows not victory nor defeat."

    Theodore Roosevelt


  2. #17
    VIP Member Array David in FL's Avatar
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    Although I love "NOYFB".......I tend to tell people who ask that I don't discuss, confirm, or deny any of the security measures that we take (or don't take) at home, with anyone outside of immediate family. On a form it gets left blank.
    "Far better it is to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs, even though checkered by failure than to rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy much nor suffer much, because they live in a grey twilight that knows not victory nor defeat."

    Theodore Roosevelt

  3. #18
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    The other perspective

    Greetings all, I'm relatively new to this blog but have been reading daily for a while now. I appreciate the insight I've gained in reading various threads. I have found a lot of good information here.

    I just wanted to try and provide some of the other perspective as to why you might get asked about access to firearms at your physician's office.

    I'm a long time gun owner and have been trained by my father (a NRA instructor) on proper care and handling since childhood. I currently have a HCP for TN and carry. I am also board certified in both Internal Medicine and Pediatrics. All this being said, at every adult or pediatric physical I ask if there are firearms in the home.

    I feel my job at physicals as your physician is to assess your overall health and try to prevent all the common causes of mortality and morbidity. That is, my job is to try and prevent premature death or disability while maintaining the healthiest lifestyle possible. To that end I ask about all sorts of lifestyle choices and risk factors including smoking, exercise, diet, seat belt use, prior screening tests, immunizations, depression symptoms and so forth. So what are the common causes of death and disability in America? Obviously heart disease and cancer are the two big ones for adults. What about teenagers? The number one cause of death in teenagers is accidents caused by either motor vehicles or firearms. This includes homicide and suicide by firearms. So I ask parents and their teens about seat belt usage and if there are firearms in the home. In doing so I have the opportunity to discuss proper safety measures they might want to think about if they haven't already.

    Now pretty much everyone on this website will by definition already have thought about safety measures and how to secure their firearms when not in use. There are a lot of people out there that don't know that though. I have the obligation to help them in that area. My spiel goes something like this. "Are there any firearms in the home? The reason I ask is that one of the leading causes of death in teenagers is accidents, including homicide and suicide, involving firearms. Now, I'm as big of a supporter of the Second Amendment as anyone and own my own firearms but if you have trigger locks, gun safes, and proper training you can greatly reduce that risk of death. And remember even if our children are well trained and respect firearms their friends might not so lets make sure our firearms are secured properly." It is simple, straightforward, and polite. I use similar language to discuss why seal belts are a good idea, why smoking is a bad idea, why exercise and proper diet make sense, and a lot of other issues.

    In adults I ask the same question for two reasons. First, by law they are responsible for their children's safety. Hence, they need to make sure to secure any weapons they have. Second, up to 7.5% of adult Americans are currently suffering from depression severe enough to effect their ability to function that means at least one adult patient in my average day at the office will be struggling with depression. The number one method of suicide in depressed people is by self inflicted gunshot wounds. If I ask about depression and firearms in adults it is to try and help avoid that outcome.

    So, I really want people to consider that physician's are generally working toward the patient's good and trying to identify problems before they become dangerous. Just like a good range officer is looking out for those under his care and trying to make sure there isn't a bad outcome. We as physician's are not interested in your home security measures or secretly working for some conspiracy against 2a. It is about preserving your quality of life and your health. The physician patient relationship is built on trust anyway. No law and no court can break that. Everything is in the strictest confidence, but if you don't want to answer something that is fine. Just say so politely or better yet ask why they are asking the question so we can talk about it.

    I've had great experiences with this approach. People are generally very receptive on how to doing things well. I've even had the opportunity to connect people with my Firearms Safety Course instructor so they could get their carry permit too.

    Anyway, thanks again for all the advice in the many other threads I've read. I appreciate the years of experience from which I can learn. I'm sure it will continue.

  4. #19
    Member Array torgo1968's Avatar
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    I'm guessing the question relates to possible depression or other mental illness. I'm not going to tell anyone that they are under any obligation to answer the question anyway, I'm just saying that it doesn't necessarily have sinister implications. I take anti-depressants, and every time I go to the doctor, regardless of the reason, they ask me if I am being threatened or feel threatened, etc. Weird stuff, but part of the routine. Interestingly, they don't ask me if I own a gun.

  5. #20
    Member Array BaserRonin's Avatar
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    No matter what their reason for asking, it does not change the fact that it is none of their business. If they were really concerned they would ask about how many cars you have, when the last time you had your furnace serviced, when the last time you had your ducts cleaned, etc. This is nothing but a phishing scam.

  6. #21
    Distinguished Member Array Rugergirl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rottkeeper View Post
    I hope you don't mind me borrowing your answer from now on Rugergirl.
    Not at all RK, feel free and enjoy
    Disclaimer: The posts made by this member are only the members opinion, not a reflection on anyone else, nor the group, and should not be cause for anyone to get their undergarments wedged in an uncomfortable position.

  7. #22
    Senior Member Array mr surveyor's Avatar
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    if doctors are qualified to give professional advice pertaining to firearms, then why not also add power tools, wet bathroom floors, ladders, kitchen knives, etc, to the list of questions?

    This "nanny state" mentality we have developed in the last 30-40 years is just totally unbelievable.


    just my opinions


    surv

  8. #23
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    Thumbs up

    NOYDB (None Of Your Darned Business.) Yep... that sounds about right!

    Scott

  9. #24
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    +1 to the NOYFB.

    I hadn't thought about telling me kids to give that answer, but that's a good idea. Talk about intrusive questions that have nothing to do with your health. Ok, so maybe not the NOYFB answer, but a child appropriate equivalent...;)

  10. #25
    Member Array Random's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MP45Man View Post
    I had to make a trip to my general practitioner today for some lingering problems I've finally go fed up with. I have not been there in two years so they had me fill out the obligatory forms. On one of the forms it asked me if I had a gun in the house. I answered yes. I suspect my physician is as liberal as they come. It will be interesting to see if anything is said going forward. I may be going back quite frequently if they can't find the problem. Stay tuned.
    I leave it blank. I'm sure they know what that means, but I won't answer it because it's not a medical question.

  11. #26
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    I've luckily never been asked such things, but I don't think I'd respond because, hey, we may be looking at state-run healthcare. Now when I fill out those things I think "this could wind up in the government's hands." Makes me think more about the answers.

  12. #27
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    "NOYFB"
    And the survey says....ding...GOOD ANSWER!

  13. #28
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    I don't recall ever seeing that question on any forms I've been ask to fill out. If I did, I think I would just for the hell of it put, "I'm not sure" just to see what happens. I really would like to induce a question from someone to ask me what I meant by it. Then I would have some real fun.

    Had another thought. Since the push to link all the medical records into a nationwide database, I suspect that the answer to that question would be added too.
    Last edited by gottabkiddin; October 8th, 2009 at 02:22 PM. Reason: additional thought
    "He that hath no sword, let him sell his garment, and buy one." Luke 22:36

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  14. #29
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    Spoonee,

    I appreciate your desire to look after your patients' well being. That's why THEY came to YOU. However, as others have posted, MDs are generally not gun safety certified professionals, and there are many many other home issues that could impact your health. You seem to be a good person with good intentions but I cannot endorse asking about firearms as part of a general medical screening. Even if your patients seem comfortable with this, they may harbor some reservations. Worse still, considering the political implications, some consider the issue a boundary violation.

    Boundary Violations --- Gun Politics in the Doctor's Office

    http://www.2ampd.net/Articles/horn2/...ice%20Form.pdf

    Dave Kopel on NRO

    Doctors for Sensible Gun Laws

    ?Death by statistic? in the ?Twilight Zone?

    Notwithstanding, welcome to the forum, and I hope you stick around.
    "Each worker carried his sword strapped to his side." Nehemiah 4:18

    Guns Save Lives. Paramedics Save Lives. But...
    Paramedics With Guns Scare People!

  15. #30
    TOF
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spoonee View Post
    Greetings all, I'm relatively new to this blog but have been reading daily for a while now. I appreciate the insight I've gained in reading various threads. I have found a lot of good information here.

    I just wanted to try and provide some of the other perspective as to why you might get asked about access to firearms at your physician's office.

    I'm a long time gun owner and have been trained by my father (a NRA instructor) on proper care and handling since childhood. I currently have a HCP for TN and carry. I am also board certified in both Internal Medicine and Pediatrics. All this being said, at every adult or pediatric physical I ask if there are firearms in the home.
    That is quite a first post Spoone. I can't help but wonder why you didn't include questions and warnings about visiting Health Professionals. It's my understanding that activity is as or more dangerous than owning guns.

    I have to concur with those that say NOYFB.
    "Those who hammer their guns into plows will plow for those who do not." - Thomas Jefferson

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