Does grip strength increase pistol recoil managment?

This is a discussion on Does grip strength increase pistol recoil managment? within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; Well today was the first time I was at the range in 3 months (I know, I know way 2 long -- no excuses) -- ...

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Thread: Does grip strength increase pistol recoil managment?

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    Member Array SnubMan's Avatar
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    Does grip strength increase pistol recoil managment?

    Well today was the first time I was at the range in 3 months (I know, I know way 2 long -- no excuses) -- anyway I noticed that it was remarkably easier to shoot both my EDC handguns since the last range visit. About the last time I went to the range 3 months ago I started a strength training program (Starting Strength -- Mark Rippetoe I highly recommend) and I know that my ability to grasp items has gone up significantly... so could that make it easier to control recoil b/c I can squeeze the gun harder/without tiring.... Does this make sense? All I know is that shooting today was much easier --- even shooting .357 magnums from my S&W M&P340 (13.3. oz revolver) wasn't 2 bad today (still painful but I could hold the little cannon in my hand w/o to much muzzle rise and thus get back on target quicker for subsequent shots)... Anyone ever notice this before -- if there is a correlation between forearm strength and recoil management then I just have one more reason to hit the gym. Thoughts???

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    Grip strength does help a lot. IMO, its the single most important thing to have for self defense, shooting or otherwise. But of course, having a death grip on your pistol causes some problems too.

    I take pride in my kung fu grip.
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    Grip strength is very important in both, managing recoil and preventing "limp wrist" malfunctions.

    That is not to say you need a "white knuckled" death grip on the gun. Having too hard of a grip does affect accuracy.

    Remember, developing good shooting skills is a physical activity. The better physically fit you are, especially in strength and flexibility, the better shooter you will become. And the you will be able to absorb and handle more powerful recoil much better.
    -Bark'n
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    Motorcycles & grip strength

    Another plus for us bikers!

    Non-riders need to know that we need to keep a good grip on the throttle (right hand). Over time this builds up a strong grip at least in the right hand.

    However, I recently got a new Honda Goldwing which has an automotive style cruise control. What to do now?

    ...Skye...

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    Distinguished Member Array TerriLi's Avatar
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    Grip strength reduces fatigue, and allows for a more steady grip for improved accuracy. I've found some of the best shots with pistols have wrist strength thats well above normal. Just look at the competition shooters, they all have very well defined forearms and wrists. You can actually see on the best shots the tendons and such standing out on their wrists hands and forearms.
    I know not what this "overkill" means.

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    My cousin paid for a large portion of medical school by playing piano in bars and taverns and other gigs.

    He would sit for hours just squeezing a tennis ball repetitively while he was reading and studying for school.

    He had a grip like a friggon vice! He could crush your hand like it was a bag of pretzels! I played guitar and wrestled in high school, so he always thought I had a "decent" grip, but he still made my hand hurt like hell!

    The point of the story is that squeezing a tennis ball is a very cheap and easy way to increase your grip strength!
    -Bark'n
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    VIP Member Array TN_Mike's Avatar
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    I can say this, since getting in shape my shooting prowess has increased by amazing amounts. I lift weights 5 nights a week and one thing I work on is grip strength, because the stronger your grip, the better able you are to control the weight, and the better able you are to control the weight, the heavier weight you can lift. The added benefit of all this is, my recoil management is much better and I shoot much more accurately and can get a followup shot on target much faster than I could when I was a fat, lazy bas-.........guy.....yeah that's what I was going to say.

    Work on the grip strength. It will help with a lot of things, not just recoil control.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skye View Post
    Another plus for us bikers!

    Non-riders need to know that we need to keep a good grip on the throttle (right hand). Over time this builds up a strong grip at least in the right hand.

    However, I recently got a new Honda Goldwing which has an automotive style cruise control. What to do now?

    ...Skye...
    I will be over to get the motorcycle. I would not want you to do anything to affect your shooting hand like using that cruise control,

    No thanks necessary after all what are forum friends for?
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    VIP Member Array Stevew's Avatar
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    Grip strength will help with shooting. Grip placement can also control muzzle flip.
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    Proper grip strength. I was taught that isometric tension placed on the front and back of the handle was the best way. Not supposed to squeezed the handle, as that can cause the pistol to twist. The isometric tension theory, if applied correctly, practically eliminates muzzle flip and drives the recoil straight back, rather than up, thus providing a constant sight picture throughout the recoil process.
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    Member Array SnubMan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zacii View Post
    Proper grip strength. I was taught that isometric tension placed on the front and back of the handle was the best way. Not supposed to squeezed the handle, as that can cause the pistol to twist. The isometric tension theory, if applied correctly, practically eliminates muzzle flip and drives the recoil straight back, rather than up, thus providing a constant sight picture throughout the recoil process.
    Can you elaborate on the concept of isometric tension on the front and back of the pistol grip.... or is it really that simple --- push and pull at the same time. Can one do this in any stance?. I tend to use isosceles (well actually my right leg is slightly back as to give me better balance)

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    VIP Member Array zacii's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SnubMan View Post
    Can you elaborate on the concept of isometric tension on the front and back of the pistol grip.... or is it really that simple --- push and pull at the same time. Can one do this in any stance?. I tend to use isosceles (well actually my right leg is slightly back as to give me better balance)
    The theory is that you use your body to create a tripod. Kind of like a 3 sided pyramid. You don't squeeze the grip, using the firing hand to push against the back of the grip and the support hand pulls against the front of the grip, there should be very little, if any, tension on the sides.

    The isometric tension is obtained in 3 parts. Facing your target in about a 30 degree bladed stance, your body across your shoulders through your torso, creates one side of one triangle, your arms obviously, create the other two sides. That's the first triangle. The second triangle, comes from your firing hand. Slightly bent, your upper arm and forearm become an upside down triangle, with the isometric tension coming from your firing hand against the back of the grip, forms an invisible hypotenuse from your firing hand to your firing shoulder. The 3rd triangle is the key part. Your support elbow drops vertically, this feels strange at first. So, your 3rd triangle forms, again upside down, from your support hand, applying pressure to the front of the grip and an invisible hypotenuse is formed from your hand to your shoulder. It is a very stable platform. If your grip is correct, there shouldn't be any contact between your firing hand palm and the side of the grip, only isometric tension from front to back on the grip.

    You'll know when you have it right, when the recoil drives your pistol straight back, instead of up, thus enabling you to stay on target for that second shot. Someone else could probably explain it better and there are many ways to skin a cat. This is just the way I was taught. YMMV
    Trust in God and keep your powder dry

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    Ex Member Array Ram Rod's Avatar
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    Does grip strength increase pistol recoil management?
    Yes, but there are limitations...or up to a certain point.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SIXTO View Post
    Grip strength does help a lot.
    It can, yes. Takes a bit of the "shakes" out of it.

    I've tried to get comfortable with the "Crush Grip" technique promoted by M. Ayoob, but it's not my cup of tea. For me, at least, I am fairly accurate with either (a) a modified weaver stance/grip with mild-to-moderate force on the grip and lots of repetition, or (b) isosceles stance with moderate force on the grip. Crush grip works fine for awhile, but it punks out fairly quickly. Not so good for range sessions. Fine for short engagements, I suppose. YMMV.
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