Is my grip/hand placement OK?

This is a discussion on Is my grip/hand placement OK? within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; What I have learned (from experience) is that isosceles is more a more stable shooting platform. I also preferred weaver until I was recommended by ...

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 23 of 23

Thread: Is my grip/hand placement OK?

  1. #16
    VIP Member
    Array sigmanluke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    3,209
    What I have learned (from experience) is that isosceles is more a more stable shooting platform. I also preferred weaver until I was recommended by my academy range instructor to adopt the isosceles (somewhat) stance. It is more mobile, without losing your master firing grip, and much much better at recoil management. It was very uncomfortable to use at first, but my shooting has improved quite a bit since using it.
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants."
    Thomas Jefferson

  2. Remove Ads

  3. #17
    VIP Member Array chiefjason's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Hickory, NC
    Posts
    2,739
    Another thing to try is this. Take your off hand thumb and put it just under the strong hand thumb. Not on top of it. The last knuckle of the off hand thumb should rest just under the crease where the strong hand thumb meets the hand. One on top of the other. Strong thumb on top of off thumb. This may put your off hand thumb on the trigger guard, perpendicular to your strong hand thumb. Now curl your weak hand fingers down and back a bit, just take up the tension. You should feel the tendon on top of your off hand wrist tighten up. Helps tame the recoil some too.

    Another thing that I am trying to do is tell my brain to let my off hand thumb point the gun. No tension or force. Just mentally thinking to myself that the thumb needs to point where I want to shoot. I need to get to the range and give it a try. Mainly if I need to fire from the hip and can't use the sites.

  4. #18
    Distinguished Member Array jarhead79's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Stansbury Park, UT
    Posts
    1,409
    Quote Originally Posted by jholen View Post
    "Your thumbs are just along for the ride!"
    At the same time, don't ignore them. It only takes one slide bite to learn that they can't be just "along for the ride". OUCH!!!
    www.ubgholsters.com short wait times. Use 'defensivecarry' as a coupon code for a discount to your order.

  5. #19
    Member Array jimtem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    249
    Quote Originally Posted by sigmanluke View Post
    What I have learned (from experience) is that isosceles is more a more stable shooting platform. I also preferred weaver until I was recommended by my academy range instructor to adopt the isosceles (somewhat) stance. It is more mobile, without losing your master firing grip, and much much better at recoil management. It was very uncomfortable to use at first, but my shooting has improved quite a bit since using it.
    Im a new shooter and havent tried the isosceles yet. Thanks for the insights. Looks like I need to make it to the range again before my CCW class next week.

  6. #20
    Distinguished Member Array MinistrMalic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    1,414
    You look pretty good to me. I prefer a Weaver stance as well.

    Isosceles is at least partially taught to LEOs because it keeps their body armor squared up on the most likely threat, which they are shooting at if they draw! It is a stable shooting platform and obviously works well.

    The Weaver stance is a bit older, but IMAO makes for a more overall stable defense platform. IOW it allows for a quicker transition into and out of armed defense and unarmed defense. I study American Kenpo, and the Weaver stance is the "neutral" stance from which most of our self defense originates. So it makes integrating that into armed defense much simpler.

    You're right, in a Weaver your weak side is slightly in front.
    "...whoever has no sword is to sell his coat and buy one." (Luke 22:36)
    Christianity and Self Defense from a Biblical Perspective

  7. #21
    Member Array Rivers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    435
    It depends upon the length of your grip whether to use the finger placement in front of the trigger guard or not. Most often, not using it is taught. For me, with my HK P2000SK in .40, that pistol basically owned ME until I moved my index finger up (actually, my whole left hand supporting grip) so the index used the trigger grip front rest. Then I could easily control recoil, etc. even with the short pistol grip (using shorter standard length magazine). Think about it, if the manufacturers went so far as to make a resting place with traction notching on the leading edge of the trigger guard, maybe there is a reason...

    I took a couple workshops with Bruce Gray. In the second workshop, I changed my grip early on. He took notice, made a comment, then looked at my results and left it alone. Apparently there is some latitude for individuality.

    And you should be able to "twiddle your thumbs" without affecting the stability of your handgrip.

  8. #22
    Senior Member Array TheShadow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Stuck In The 1970's
    Posts
    915
    I always thought the support index finger on the trigger guard was a no no but hey if it works for you...

    My grip is very similar to Hickok45's Grip on Youtube except I don't cross my thumbs with a semi-auto.
    “Put your pain in a box. Lock it down. No man is stronger than one who can harness his emotions.” -Act of Valor

  9. #23
    Ex Member Array Ram Rod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Fayetteville, AR
    Posts
    13,687
    I got some good schooling by a lefty during one of our Steel Challenge matches a while back after he had seen me take two shots at two different plates (miss first and hit second) on a distance stage. He had some good advice like jholen mentioned (70%-30%), and I've been doing my own thing for a while, but not very good on the plates out past 30 feet in some cases. I've been working on my grip because of this, and doing better now at the longer distances. This is good advice. I will say one thing though.......if the slide doesn't rip a gash over your thumb, then you've already past step one. Keep up the good work, and practice, practice, practice. Then when you are done practicing, practice some more.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Right Hand, Left Hand, One Hand, Both Hands, Either Hand
    By Bill MO in forum Defensive Carry & Tactical Training
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: February 21st, 2011, 03:53 PM
  2. Shot placement, shot placement, shot placement
    By torgo1968 in forum In the News: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: July 24th, 2009, 06:20 PM
  3. Hand to Hand Combat (empty handed)
    By weazel in forum Off Topic & Humor Discussion
    Replies: 40
    Last Post: March 7th, 2008, 05:35 AM
  4. Video Links - Hand to Hand Techniques?
    By ArmyCop in forum Law Enforcement, Military & Homeland Security Discussion
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: December 10th, 2007, 10:03 PM
  5. Frontsight ad placement
    By FknRa in forum Off Topic & Humor Discussion
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: August 6th, 2007, 06:29 PM

Search tags for this page

2 handed weaver, and 2 handed isosceles stance with ruger sp101

Click on a term to search for related topics.