Glow-On Super Phosphorescent. A glow in the dark gun sights tutorial

Glow-On Super Phosphorescent. A glow in the dark gun sights tutorial

This is a discussion on Glow-On Super Phosphorescent. A glow in the dark gun sights tutorial within the Glow-On forums, part of the Site Sponsors category; Glow-On super Phosphorescent in the paint for is a versatile medium. paint is what you make of it really. In any case lets first review ...

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Thread: Glow-On Super Phosphorescent. A glow in the dark gun sights tutorial

  1. #1
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    Lightbulb Glow-On Super Phosphorescent. A glow in the dark gun sights tutorial

    Glow-On super Phosphorescent in the paint for is a versatile medium.
    paint is what you make of it really.

    In any case lets first review the physical characteristics of the product and its application.


    Glow-On is water based, it dries in a few hours bout, it continues to cure for a few days. So for the first days it will be a bit vulnerable. So don't testy it by scratching it...Just take our word for it.


    It will harden to the consistency of synthetic concrete.
    You will notice then the finish is not very smooth, so..


    After it dries, a couple of layers on a clear coat of good quality will render the surface smooth and then easier to clean.
    We recommend Sally Hansen Hard as nails coat. Affordable and easy to find.


    continue...
    Go with the glow


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    ...we continue..


    The first thing after you open the vial of paint is you stir a and mix well.
    glow particles are heavy and have the tendency to go to settle.


    Then, using the wooden stick (sharpen it if you need to) and with the help of the rim of the vial you load a generous drop, bead, or such onto the tip:





    You basically deposit a drop of paint over the area. Work as fast as you can, the paint likes to dry and becomes pasty.
    If this happens return the paint to the vial, mix and repeat.





    Another drop, as if we are doing a rear sight job...







    ...Continues.....
    Go with the glow

  3. #3
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    ...We continue...
    Thi is what we have so far:








    After this dries and cures it will flattens a bit and it will look like this:


    Go with the glow

  4. #4
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    ..We continue...


    We recommend using the wooden stick or something similar.
    We never use a brush, a brush seems like a logical thing but it is not.


    The brush leaves a flat painted area like the one on the far right.
    Too thin, not enough material, not much glow. The bristles will absorb the fine sand in the paint...it will take a lot longer to finish, you'll feel compelled to use water to make this work diluting further the product.


    Please use the stick. Practice a bit over a random surface with the stick, deposit small drops, learn how the product behaves, it will pay later.







    Go with the glow

  5. #5
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    We continue....
    Here's an example on a fishing lure...the same procedure..







    We think now it's clear why we want to use the stick, or, as stick thing, ha, ha.
    Go with the glow

  6. #6
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    We continue...


    Now lets talk guns.....
    Here are some basic irons, plain serrated. no white dot or marks.
    The easiest config is a straight eight.


    The first thing is, we make sure the surface is clean. We take a piece of clean, new paper towel and 95% alcohol.
    Then we clean this thing well, we don't use our fingers since they are greasy at all times, we use the paper towel.







    Using the method explained before, we set in the Glow-On on front sight.
    This front sight has a small divot, an empty dot of sorts so we fill it generously.


    It's a good idea to lean our wrist on a cup, a small can or such to stabilize our wrist.






    Now we work on the rear and we carefully place a large drop of stuff, if we miss the spot, no problem, we just wipe it of and then try again.





    We let this dry for a few minutes now.....
    Go with the glow

  7. #7
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    My glocks have the white dots, I assume I can just paint over them? Or do I need to remove the white paint? (Thanks, this is exactly what I was wondering).
    Typos are for the entertainment of the reader. Don't let it go to your head

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by farsidefan1 View Post
    My glocks have the white dots, I assume I can just paint over them? Or do I need to remove the white paint? (Thanks, this is exactly what I was wondering).
    There's no need to remove the paint. It's more practical to paint the dots over.
    Go with the glow

  9. #9
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    After it dries, if it need more paint we apply it. Careful here, here's when things can start to go wrong.


    If we did a good job in the beginning we just apply some light and test the sights.










    We test in the dark...







    Go with the glow

  10. #10
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    Details, details, details......


    Here is an extra step, which is not completely necessary, just a matter of taste.


    The dot on the rear sight is a big one, for visibility.


    We decided to flatten it a bit and this is how it can be done.


    The paint during the drying process, it starts to solidify.
    At one point it has the consistency of paste.
    About thirty minutes into it and it will last maybe for a few hours.


    What we did is we took the same wooden stick we used to apply the Glow-On.
    with the wide side of it we pushed the semi dry paint as this photo shows:





    An now it looks like this:




    Go with the glow

  11. #11
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    We did the same to the front sights and this is the end result.


    After this we should apply some clear coat and it's ready.




    Go with the glow

  12. #12
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    Very nice. I'm doing mine as soon as I have another gun for backup while the glow-on dries.

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