What room for a safe room? Kids bedroom or mine?

What room for a safe room? Kids bedroom or mine?

This is a discussion on What room for a safe room? Kids bedroom or mine? within the Home (And Away From Home) Defense Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; I hope this is the right place to post this thread. Here's my question: I'll be moving into a new home soon and need advice ...

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Thread: What room for a safe room? Kids bedroom or mine?

  1. #1
    Member Array skunkworks's Avatar
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    What room for a safe room? Kids bedroom or mine?

    I hope this is the right place to post this thread. Here's my question:
    I'll be moving into a new home soon and need advice on what room to fortify for a safe room. I don't have plans to go crazy, just a good solid door with deadbolt and some supplies like: spare pre-paid cell phone, things written to include in call to 911 dispatcher, extra set of house keys to toss out the window for LEO when they arrive, and the usual secure firearms supply.
    My first thoughts are to have my own bedroom be the place, but what happens when things go bump in the night? Do run across the hall, grab your children and bring them to your room, or do you grab your SD weapon of choice and run to the child's room?
    The two rooms are both at the end of the hallway upstairs. They are both close to the same size. One is at the front of the house, and one is at the back (both share an outside end wall). For our purposes they are identical. I'm certain that I can install a lock box in the spare closet of my child's room for essentials and even a gun-vault for a separate handgun. I would feel comfortable doing this.
    Still, my own bedroom would afford me more options.

    What makes the most tactical sense? What would you do?
    I'll keep my freedom, my liberty, and my guns. You can keep the change.


  2. #2
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    I would make my own bedroom the "fortified" one, simply because that's the one I spend the most time in and the one that I "control." Train your kids to run to your room when trouble is afoot, or grab 'em yourself if they're too young.

    If you're serious about fortifying it, use an exterior door and reinforce both the hinge side and the lock side as well as the lock strike. You can find lots written about that on the net.

    Keeping a "throw" key to your exterior doors in the bedroom is such a good idea I'm surprised more people haven't caught on. My advice is to tie the key to a short length of broom or rake handle that's been painted da-glo orange... easier to throw and easier for the cavalry to see once it's thrown.

    Remember the shortfalls of the 911 system with respect to cell phones... do not assume that they will immediately know which address to respond to. Give your address twice - that's more important that your name! If time allows, describe what you, the homeowner, look like and what you're wearing.

    I'm happy to hear you're looking well past just having a gun on hand. The mind is the weapon, the gun is just a tool.
    l1a1 likes this.
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    A few that I have seen for this purpose are actually large walk-in closets adjacent to a master bedroom. There are no windows. That might solve your problem but does not address the kids.
    Possibly consider adding a self closing area separation ballistic door in the hallway that leads to the master bedroom and the children's room(s). To go all out use a fail-safe magnetic locking device wired to a motion detector.
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    VIP Member Array Guantes's Avatar
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    I would consider a decorative iron gate at the front end of the hallway.

  5. #5
    Member Array skunkworks's Avatar
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    All good suggestions. I like the idea of a hallway door.
    A set of keys on a big orange foam floating boat key chain is what I've used before for the responding LEO, but something larger would be good in the snow.

    No walk-in closets are available. Thanks for everyone's thoughts, though I'm not really looking for "how-to" advice. With respect, I'm well versed in what is needed for a safe room. Though, I think that a "safe room ideas and how-to" would be a great thread.

    I'm still interested in what folks say about what bedroom to use. Kids are young and sleep through most anything. I know that there is no sure thing, just looking for the best advantage. What have YOU done? Do you run drills with your kids? What location seems to work, and what can you suggest for my situation?
    Keep 'em comin'.
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  6. #6
    Member Array HuttoAg96's Avatar
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    Here's my thoughts... first sign of trouble, you have to go make sure your kids are safe and secure. Why risk having to herd them back across the house, keeping them covered, etc., with potential hostile(s) in the house? Get to where they are and hunker down.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Array DIABLO9489's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skunkworks View Post
    I hope this is the right place to post this thread. Here's my question:
    I'll be moving into a new home soon and need advice on what room to fortify for a safe room. I don't have plans to go crazy, just a good solid door with deadbolt and some supplies like: spare pre-paid cell phone, things written to include in call to 911 dispatcher, extra set of house keys to toss out the window for LEO when they arrive, and the usual secure firearms supply.
    My first thoughts are to have my own bedroom be the place, but what happens when things go bump in the night? Do run across the hall, grab your children and bring them to your room, or do you grab your SD weapon of choice and run to the child's room?
    The two rooms are both at the end of the hallway upstairs. They are both close to the same size. One is at the front of the house, and one is at the back (both share an outside end wall). For our purposes they are identical. I'm certain that I can install a lock box in the spare closet of my child's room for essentials and even a gun-vault for a separate handgun. I would feel comfortable doing this.
    Still, my own bedroom would afford me more options.

    What makes the most tactical sense? What would you do?
    That's a great idea I will have to look into myself
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  8. #8
    Distinguished Member Array Guardian's Avatar
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    Oh no, definitely the kids room my friend. If trouble is a foot, do you want your kids leaving their room to try and get to yours no matter the distance, I don't think so. Let me put it this way, you are the one with the weapons, if anyone should venture out of their room, it should be you, your armed, the kids are not. If you kids leave their room and the BG is right their, your chit is weak right away. Kids room all the way, your first priority is to protect your family and children and women come first in that order.
    "I dislike death, however, there are some things I dislike more than death. Therefore, there are times when I will not avoid danger" Mencius"

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    I Beleave my home is a safe room. But I would say if bump in the night happens, I'm going to investigate no doubt about it. My wife will stay put with shoty, I have know youngins (Kids) She (wife) will 911 it, I know the layout of my home & Have security lights.

    As in your case (OP) I would have to go with Guardian on his post Good Luck & Stay Safe ; )
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    Why my friend build it house he was going to make the bathroom a safe room. It was accessible from the upstairs from all rooms w/o going into the main hallway. He had plans for an steel door and some ballistic wallboard to be put on the interior walls and I think something similar for the floor. Of course due to budget none of it happened, but it sounded like a good plan.

  11. #11
    VIP Member Array shockwave's Avatar
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    extra set of house keys to toss out the window for LEO when they arrive
    This strikes me as being almost akin to an urban legend. It's so ridiculous and it's thinking in the wrong way. The point of concentration has got to be in dealing with the immediate threat at hand. If you are lucky and there is time - and this does happen - a call to 911 finishes that end of the story.

    What is the scenario that requires the house key with a day-glo keyfob? If the BGs burst into the house and are attacking your fortified safe room, the front door is already open. Did the BGs burst in, repair the lock, secure the door, then go about attacking? Are the BGs pounding at your safe room door, with the police outside and seeking entry? Either these guys have gotten to you, or they have fled. It is possible to construct some kind of situation in which this might be useful, but it's striking me as fear and paranoia such that a person feels as if they are taking proactive, defensive measures by grinding spare keys and sourcing colorful key rings, when the real effort should be spent on obtaining strong weapons and training hard with them.
    "It may seem difficult at first, but everything is difficult at first."

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by shockwave View Post
    This strikes me as being almost akin to an urban legend. It's so ridiculous and it's thinking in the wrong way. The point of concentration has got to be in dealing with the immediate threat at hand. If you are lucky and there is time - and this does happen - a call to 911 finishes that end of the story.

    What is the scenario that requires the house key with a day-glo keyfob? If the BGs burst into the house and are attacking your fortified safe room, the front door is already open. Did the BGs burst in, repair the lock, secure the door, then go about attacking? Are the BGs pounding at your safe room door, with the police outside and seeking entry? Either these guys have gotten to you, or they have fled. It is possible to construct some kind of situation in which this might be useful, but it's striking me as fear and paranoia such that a person feels as if they are taking proactive, defensive measures by grinding spare keys and sourcing colorful key rings, when the real effort should be spent on obtaining strong weapons and training hard with them.

    Off the top of my head, who says they are coming in the front door? It could of been through an open window, the garage, sliding door, etc. The suspects could easily close anyone of them behind so it doesn't look out of place to someone who might happen to walk by look out their window. Allowing the police a fast way into the house is preferable to them having to search every exterior door/window or breaking something to gain entrance.

  13. #13
    Member Array usmcj's Avatar
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    I have two bedrooms upstairs as well. We always went to the kids' room because it's closer to the stairway, and the stairway is a choke point to upstairs access. It became clear after the very first incident, that it would be much easier to get my wife and I into the kids' room than to wake two sleepyheads and control them down the hall and into our room. Our stairway will not allow side-by-side ascent, so from the kids room, I have complete control over who makes it to that top step without exposing myself to an intruder. Plus, the kids are in their own room, comfortable in those surroundings, and it's easier to keep them quiet.

    Works for me, but may not be everybody's answer.
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  14. #14
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    I gave up on making a safe room, and went ahead and made the entire 2nd floor a safe floor. The staircase can be shut off from the downstairs quickly with a gate. The gate is not unattractive and it appears to simply be a decorative gate for kids or pets.
    One option many people forget is an escape route. They lock themselves into a interior closet or bathroom forgetting they might have to get out in case of fire etc. Fire is a common way criminals try to hide a larger crime. I keep a fire ladder in each bedroom.
    "Just blame Sixto"

  15. #15
    Member Array skunkworks's Avatar
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    Yep, fire ladders are already on my list for the new place.
    The keys are so that the police don't have to break down my door. If it is a false alarm or the intruder has already fled, I don't really want to pay for a new door and casing.
    In fact, years ago I had an intruder come in through a window. There are certainly things to be said about proofing the exterior of your home ( no blind spots, lights, thorny bushes under windows, etc...) but I want to be able to give the responding units every advantage if it ever comes to a bad situation. If there is a lone LEO responding or only one entering at the front door, I would think that keys would be much easier than a forced entry. If I were said LEO, I wouldn't want to follow a BG through an open window or have to climb in somewhere that didn't allow me to have my weapon drawn. Just my preference. You can call "urban legend" all you want. If you don't want to do it, don't.
    I'm thinking that both bedrooms might get exterior steel doors and deadbolts. That way options are open.
    I'll keep my freedom, my liberty, and my guns. You can keep the change.

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