Upgrading door security...

This is a discussion on Upgrading door security... within the Home (And Away From Home) Defense Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; I've recently started a job where I will be away from home for a lot more than usual, with the fiance and two month old ...

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Thread: Upgrading door security...

  1. #1
    Member Array Foo909's Avatar
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    Upgrading door security...

    I've recently started a job where I will be away from home for a lot more than usual, with the fiance and two month old at home...thankfully with our rather large loud dog as well.

    I was looking at beefing up the door security a little bit with something like this:

    http://www.asafehome.net/index.html

    for both the front and back doors, as well as these:

    http://www.lowes.com/pd_287043-350-8...FNtt%3Dkwikset


    "Patented side locking bar technology offers improved security by protecting against lock bumping, an attack technique used to defeat conventional pin & tumbler locks. "

    The back door currently doesn't have a deadbolt but I do have a small security chain.

    Has anyone here used the Strikemaster II Pro? Would it be better just to get the cheaper strike plates they offer at Lowes that extend a bit longer for $6 a piece?. Also we have wooden/laminate doors, not solid wood. Are they even worth beefing up at the contact points or can they easily be kicked through?

    The front door has a locking glass security door so that's not as big of a concern.

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  3. #2
    Member Array ncsteveh's Avatar
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    I installed them on all my exterior doors, however I bought a box of 3 1/2 in screws because of the gap in the framing behind the molding and I wanted good penetration. I would also suggest looking into Schlage commercial locks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ncsteveh View Post
    I installed them on all my exterior doors, however I bought a box of 3 1/2 in screws because of the gap in the framing behind the molding and I wanted good penetration. I would also suggest looking into Schlage commercial locks.

    EXCELLENT advice.

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    It's not the door itself that's so much of a concern but the door frame. Most are wood, and cheap wood at that. Even longer screws offer only slightly better security. Once the wood frame splinters longer screws don't help, regardless of the type locks installed. Of this I speak from experience. The Strikemaster seems like a viable means of strengthening the frame.

    That little chain is worthless.
    Retired USAF E-8. Avatar is OldVet from days long gone. Oh, to be young again.
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    Buying time

    Hardening doors is OK, but only one spoke in the security wheel. All doors can be breached - ask any fireman. "Secure" doors just buy a little time to put your/her plan into action.

    The windows are probably a weaker link than the doors. Give those some thought too.

    Do you have a specific plan? Rehearse your plan to see if it will work. If not, change it. You will both rest easier.

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    Member Array Foo909's Avatar
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    I realize there's no way I can even afford to make a door as impenetrable as possible, but it's the things such as the large dog, security system sign out front, proper outside lighting, doors that are harder to breach than a couple kicks, and no foliage to hide in that make us "less" of a target.

    The woman has a Kimber "Life Act" pepper spray guardian that she knows how to use which also gives her another chance.

    The windows are a weak point in the house but other than removing them or putting some film over them I probably can't afford I'm kind of at a loss with those. Provided she is home the house isn't large enough where she wouldn't hear it break nor the dog who would instantly go for lack of a better term: ape ****. Not to mention on both sides we have good neighbors close and the front and rear of the home have proper lighting for night time...

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    Senior Member Array dsee11789's Avatar
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    You may want to look at these as well....



    I recently locked myself out of the house and had to kick my door in. It only took 2 good kicks.

    The Frame didn't fail. The door itself failed around the latch. Its a solid heavy door too.



    You may also want to consider getting her a shotgun.
    Exodus 22:2 "If a thief is caught breaking in and is struck so that he dies, the defender is not guilty of bloodshed"

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    Member Array Foo909's Avatar
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    G19 with a Viridian is the "house" gun.

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    Quote Originally Posted by OldVet View Post
    It's not the door itself that's so much of a concern but the door frame. Most are wood, and cheap wood at that. Even longer screws offer only slightly better security. Once the wood frame splinters longer screws don't help, regardless of the type locks installed. Of this I speak from experience. The Strikemaster seems like a viable means of strengthening the frame.

    That little chain is worthless.

    On my Schlage deadbolts, there is a metal "cup" that you install into the hole in the door frame and that screws directly to the studs with 3" screws. The only screws in the door frame are decorative to secure the striker only. The "cup" keeps the bolt captive and should make frame splintering more difficult. Not as good as the Strikemaster, but better than just securing the striker with long screws.

    I also use Schlage keypad deadbolts. No keys to lose or get stolen (but you can have a key as a backup which I don't keep on me), resistant to bumping, no need to fumble with key when you leave, different combos for different people and no motors to fail. I've installed these on my home and two friends and they all love them. They also make a high end version with WiFi connectivity so you can remotely set codes and see logs when people come and go.
    "I got a lot of problems with you people!" - Frank Costanza

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    Ex Member Array JOHNSMITH's Avatar
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    I'm still skeptical about how secure those wireless locks are. It seems easy for a company to make a residential product and cut corners on the engineering because they figure homeowners are never going to find out.

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    Quote Originally Posted by paul34 View Post
    I'm still skeptical about how secure those wireless locks are. It seems easy for a company to make a residential product and cut corners on the engineering because they figure homeowners are never going to find out.
    Yeah, no experience with them myself, my next place I'll get them. The Schlage is using ZWave for it's wireless and I have no experience with it and never looked in to how explotable it is. I'm happy with my "plain" keypads though.
    "I got a lot of problems with you people!" - Frank Costanza

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    Member Array Ecucmgt's Avatar
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    The strike reinforcement you show are from a local company near me and I bought some from them. The owner had a display wall and asked me if I wanted to try to kick the door. The door is the standard residential steel skin over wood and foam. The jamb was the standard prehung exterior door unit from lowes or home depot. The wall was standard 2 x 4. The strikemaster was installed. They also had two plates with bolts for reinforcing the door at the deadbolt. I am 6" 3" 240 Pounds and I kicked the **** out of the door 10 times. The door did not open. The door had been kicked alot before me as well. I was sold. Just look up lock bumping on you tube and you will want to change your locks asap.

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    IMO something like this is better than the screws and plates.

    Clothing, Toys, Electronics, Jewelry, Jaclyn Smith - Kmart.com
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    And that has made all the difference.

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    Member Array Foo909's Avatar
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    Ordered two of the StrikeMaster II Pro's from the company that produces them, very quick shipping and product looks excellent, also got a great e-mail from the company when I ordered about to call for assistance with anything. Very impressed so far.

    Also stopped at Lowe's this morning after work and picked up two Kwikset SecureKey dead bolt and entry door combo packs that are ANSI Grade 1, bump proof and pick resistant.

    Should be doing the install on both today!

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    Quote Originally Posted by atctimmy View Post
    IMO something like this is better than the screws and plates.

    Clothing, Toys, Electronics, Jewelry, Jaclyn Smith - Kmart.com
    I have those, bought them at Lowes. I removed the cheesy adjustment button, drilled it out, and installed a beefy bolt. I have one on the front door, the rear door, and the door to the garage. Also have one for the door into our safe room.

    I agree that it is probably better than any other option. Only way to break in would be to destroy the door.
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