Let's talk about storm cellars/shelters

This is a discussion on Let's talk about storm cellars/shelters within the Home (And Away From Home) Defense Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; We don't have tornadoes here very often, but I also want to put in a large root cellar which could double as a storm shelter. ...

Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst 12345
Results 61 to 68 of 68
Like Tree3Likes

Thread: Let's talk about storm cellars/shelters

  1. #61
    Distinguished Member Array Chaplain Scott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    1,596
    We don't have tornadoes here very often, but I also want to put in a large root cellar which could double as a storm shelter. Our biggest problem is the water table is at 4' durig irrigation season, so I have thought about digging down 3 1/2 ft & putting a layer of rock down and then having a large concrete square culvert (8' w x 7' H x 20'L) long put into the hole and covered with about 4' of dirt--I'm thinking that should do nicely for a root cellar and double as a storm shelter if need be.
    Scott, US Army 1974-2004

    Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction. It must be fought for, protected, and handed on or one day we will spend our sunset years telling our children what it was once like in the United States where men were free.
    - Ronald Reagan

  2. Remove Ads

  3. #62
    Senior Member Array Sky Pilot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Lorain County, Ohio
    Posts
    847
    Full basement.
    No flooding danger this location.
    Tornado survivor summer 1963.
    If ever I have another house built, the basement will have a poured cement overhead below grade and covered with a couple feet of dirt.
    "Deine Papieren bitte?" or "ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ !"
    (Choose only one)
    NRA Endowment Member
    "I bark at no man's bid. I will never come and go, and fetch and carry, at the whistle of the great man in the White House no matter who he is." -- David Crockett

  4. #63
    Senior Member Array Beans's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    AZ Border Territory,
    Posts
    1,002
    Tornado Survivor-- Summer 1955 (NE MO)
    Cyclone Survivor --Summer 1957 (NE MO)
    Cyclone Survivor --Summer 1958 (NE MO)
    Typhoon Survivor-- Summer 1969 (SVN)
    Mississippe River Flood-- Surviver 1973 (NE MO)

    Growning up in NE Missouri on a farm we had a "root" celler that we stored our home canned items and potatoes in. It also doubled as a "storm' shelter. It was about 30 feet from the house. We always had enought warning to get into the shelter before the main body of the storms hit, only one hit in the night. We had to clear some debris away from the entrance to get out. We kept a double bitted axe in the celler for that reason.

    We never lost the house, had ALL the windows blown out and most of the shingles blown off of it. Over the years we lost several out building. a smoke house, barn damaged and a chicken house with about 60 chickens in it.

  5. #64
    Distinguished Member Array SpringerXD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Southeast
    Posts
    1,938
    I just got back from a few days visiting my mom in West Central Alabama. It just so happens that my last exit off the Interstate is through Tuscaloosa. I went back down there on Sunday to take some photos. Even though we very seldom have threatening weather here in Knoxville, this motivates me to get a shelter:

    Tornado Aftermath
    "I practice the ancient art of Klik Pao."

    -miklcolt45

  6. #65
    New Member Array JuliusJones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    1

    Granger Plastics Shelter= EXTREMELY NICE!

    Quote Originally Posted by SpringerXD View Post
    Good point. It could also easily become a nesting den for snakes or who knows what. Granger Plastics sells a shelter that's supposed to last 10,000 years or something like that.
    I have to say after owning other shelters mentioned in this post and then moving to a home without a shelter last year, I was shopping for something different. I previously owned an inground steel shelter, that was "guaranteed" not to rust, leak and all that good stuff. Well, needless to say, about 3 years into it, it became a maintenance headache. Paint quickly began popping off of the interior after about 2 years. The following spring, we had the tiny unit painted on site, to the tune of $1500. Luckily, my job relocated me last year and we went on the hunt for a new shelter. Doing my due diligence and talking to some of the fiberglass manufacturers, I didn't get a warm fuzzy feeling from many of them, as they couldn't answer my questions. Being a "Heston-esque" Gun collector, I was also looking for something that had "Safe Room" potential for my wife and kids. I then found Granger Plastics on the internet last year and had to check out a unit. So, the wife and I packed up and drove up to Cincinnati to see this thing, because honestly, it just sounded too good to be true. a 1,000+ year life span? I couldn't believe it! So, we get to Granger to see the units- and HOLY SH*T! The unit is built like no other! Very strong, very tuff plastic! I not only left their manufacturing plant with a new source for plastic tanks and stuff, but I bought 2 units, one for my family and one for 80 year old my mother in law. Hell, they even took me to a local gun later that evening while we stayed in town to visit friends and see a Jimmy Buffet show in Cincinnati. I can't say enough good things about the Granger Plastics Tornado Shelter, I really can't. It's very much so a single family unit (you could get 7-8 people in it). They've really thought thru this and had good answers for all my questions. Just like the tree falling on the door that people have brought up on here about other units. The door of this unit is attached on the exterior which makes for easy removal, but also, they suggested that I keep a bottle jack and some 2 x 6's in the unit in case something is to ever fall on the door (Good cheap fix for $20-$30 at your local tractor supply). Plus the door is replaced for FREE if or when we see an impact. Hell, I just recently upgraded to a new door that they recently had fema tested at texas tech, that allowed me to put a 1.25" sheet of Bullet Proof lexane in it to make it into a viable safe room. Extremely good guys! I highly suggest anybody who's considering it to check it out! You can see them on the web at Inground Safety Shelter Tornado Shelters Storm Shelters


    Few dry boxes in the unit with a little supplies and your ready to rock. Oh yeah, I can't stress enough... EASY install! no anchor, no concrete needed, half day and I was done!

  7. #66
    PM
    PM is offline
    Senior Member Array PM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    650
    I know of one person who was building ground up who put a cement block room in a pantry or as a pantry in their house. The block was filled with cement and rebar and caped with a cement "lid". You may be able to retrofit something like unto in a garage or other area of your house or build a passage from your house to one just under ground. From what I have heard most of the storm rooms they are building are simply re-enforced block as I discribed above.

  8. #67
    Distinguished Member Array SpringerXD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Southeast
    Posts
    1,938
    Quote Originally Posted by JuliusJones View Post
    ....they suggested that I keep a bottle jack......
    I first read this as "keep a bottle of Jack." I thought it was their way of saying, "You're not getting out of there for a while."

    "I practice the ancient art of Klik Pao."

    -miklcolt45

  9. #68
    VIP Member
    Array shooterX's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    2,849
    Is your all brick house solid masonry construction? If not, then it isn't any stronger or safer than the house with wood siding or stucco. The brick on your house is most likely a veneer which doesn't not offer any structural strength as it is held off the stud wall about 1" for drainage and "held" to the building by brick ties.
    "Don't start none, won't be none!"

Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst 12345

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

family safe storm shelter reviews

,

flat safe cost

,

flat safe prices

,

flat safe reviews

,
flat safe shelter prices
,

flat safe tornado shelter prices

,
flat safe tornado shelter reviews
,

flat safe tornado shelters cost

,

flatsafe tornado shelter reviews

,

how much does a flat safe shelter cost

,

precast concrete root cellar

,

shipping container storm shelter

Click on a term to search for related topics.