Fortify a Door From Zombies

This is a discussion on Fortify a Door From Zombies within the Home (And Away From Home) Defense Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; We have a side door no one ever uses. We just use the area for storage. Just in case of a zombie attack, I would ...

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  1. #1
    New Member Array TayFifer's Avatar
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    Fortify a Door From Zombies

    We have a side door no one ever uses. We just use the area for storage. Just in case of a zombie attack, I would like to fortify the door. I'm brainstorming ideas. I'm aware of products that reinforce the door jam but I want to take it a step further and put a removable 6" x 6" piece of wood that braces the door closed.

    The benefit my idea (shown below) is that we can still use the space above and below the 6" x 6" for storage.

    Here is my diagram. Please offer any alternate ideas or comments.

    upload.jpg

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    Member Array R.W.Dale's Avatar
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    Bookmarked!!

    posted via tapatalk using android.

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    Part E should be perpendicular to Part B and the door, and the 45 degree angle can be more strongly buttressed against Part A. As it is, E is at a 45 degree angle to the door, making it inherently weak since Part B and the door are both moving parts.

    That's my read, but I am not an engineer.

    And since you are Zombie proofing, put a treadmill outside in front of that door.
    Richard

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    New Member Array TayFifer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rock and Glock View Post
    Part E should be perpendicular to Part B and the door, and the 45 degree angle can be more strongly buttressed against Part A. As it is, E is at a 45 degree angle to the door, making it inherently weak since Part B and the door are both moving parts.
    Yea you might be right about that. But in terms of convenience its easier to store boxes above, below and behind the original drawing. Here's a drawing of your revision suggestion...

    upload - Copy.jpg

    If I go with the original, do you think it would be good enough to withstand a lot of zombies? I can do significant buttressiing.

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    Member Array l1a1's Avatar
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    GREAT!!!!!! Now you've gone and given the Zombies the plans for your Zombie proof door. Start over.
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    Array Rock and Glock's Avatar
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    The risk of slippage of Part E in the original could well be negated by a stout buttress on the doorknob side of B. That Could keep Part E from skating off towards the edge. Enough wood in there and anything will work.
    Richard

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    "You may think I'm pompous, but actually I'm pedantic... let me explain the difference."

    "Carry the battle to them. Don't let them bring it to you. Put them on the defensive and don't ever apologize for anything."

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    I am no good a drawing but why not put a steel “L” bracket on both sides of the door then just drop a bar into the brackets to keep it from being opened.

    This link may help explain what i mean. http://www.ehow.com/list_6151216_har...-bar-door.html
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    New Member Array TayFifer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by msgt/ret View Post
    ...why not put a steel “L” bracket on both sides of the door then just drop a bar into the brackets to keep it from being opened...]
    I hear ya, and that's an excellent suggestion. I thought of something like that with brackets and a 2"x4" but I don't know what the material on either side of the door is. It seems to be plaster and I'm not sure where the solid wood is beneath the plaster.

    The image shows the area that appears to be weak plaster.
    Re to Warehouse Comment - Copy.jpg

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    VIP Member Array tkruf's Avatar
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    How about get you 3 pieces of good heavy angle iron. mount one to the door, one to the inside wall in such a manner that the third will run from door to wall at appropriate angle to keep door from opening. You can use bolts/removable pins to remove the 3rd piece (the bar so to speak), so you can use the door if need be. For the best results two or even three of these at different levels on the door would enforce it at more points. One up higher, one at knob level and one down lower.

    Just an idea.
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    Quote Originally Posted by TayFifer View Post
    I hear ya, and that's an excellent suggestion. I thought of something like that with brackets and a 2"x4" but I don't know what the material on either side of the door is. It seems to be plaster and I'm not sure where the solid wood is beneath the plaster.

    The image shows the area that appears to be weak plaster.
    Re to Warehouse Comment - Copy.jpg
    A stud finder like these will help to find the solid wood. Tools & Hardware - Hand Tools - Stud Finders - at The Home Depot
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    Member Array mkphillips's Avatar
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    The simplest way I have found is take 2 large eye bolts that will let a 3/4" pipe slide through and mount the eye bolts on both sides of the door. Drill each end on the pipe for a pin that will stop the pipe from sliding out. Mount this a couple of inches below the door knob.

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    New Member Array TayFifer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tkruf View Post
    How about get you 3 pieces of good heavy angle iron. mount one to the door, one to the inside wall in such a manner that the third will run from door to wall at appropriate angle to keep door from opening. You can use bolts/removable pins to remove the 3rd piece (the bar so to speak), so you can use the door if need be. For the best results two or even three of these at different levels on the door would enforce it at more points. One up higher, one at knob level and one down lower.

    Just an idea.
    Something like this? I will call it Angle Iron Master Plan 01
    Angle Iron Master Plan.jpg

    Or Angle Iron Master Plan 02
    Angle Iron Master Plan 01.jpg

    My original idea is basically something in this ballpark except with the option of removing the wood in the middle, and with boards on the ends instead of just another 6"x6".
    Simply 01.jpg

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    Member Array Porp's Avatar
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    M., l1a1 and Rock and Glock like this.

  16. #15
    New Member Array TayFifer's Avatar
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    Master final plan

    Master Final Plan.jpg

    Total budget = $75 at home depot including screws and all that jazz.

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