Bedside Gun with Infants, Toddlers and Small Kids - Page 2

Bedside Gun with Infants, Toddlers and Small Kids

This is a discussion on Bedside Gun with Infants, Toddlers and Small Kids within the Home (And Away From Home) Defense Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; Something like this works very well. Not sure you could do the same with yours. Easy for me to access from laying down. I usually ...

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Thread: Bedside Gun with Infants, Toddlers and Small Kids

  1. #16
    Member Array FAS1's Avatar
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    Something like this works very well. Not sure you could do the same with yours. Easy for me to access from laying down. I usually sleep on my side facing this direction. It is right there next to my pillow and very secure.

    FAS1 SAFE - YouTube


  2. #17
    VIP Member Array BugDude's Avatar
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    I sleep on my side/stomach with a pillow that I lean on. My properly hosltered gun (leather with retention snap) is under the leaning pillow facing away from anyone. For my kids to get to it, they would have to move me...and they can't. Other than when I am asleep, it is on my person. If I get up for any reason, it goes with me.
    Know Guns, Know Safety, Know Peace.
    No Guns, No Safety, No Peace.

  3. #18
    Member Array Fish_4_Fun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bdcheung View Post
    Yeah we've got a great watch dog. She'll watch the guy walk up to the house, watch him kick in the door, watch him take our stuff, and watch him leave. She's a great watch dog. ;)
    Quote Originally Posted by oneshot View Post
    ^^^^^^^^^I'm in this camp^^^^^^^^^^^^


    Put it in the closest drawer, (sock drawer, undies drawer) or whatever, and swing out of bed, open drawer, manipulate lock, and open.

    Or do as has been mentioned, buy a pistol, that cannot shoot(all the manufacturers have them) with the magazine removed.
    Keep one in the chamber, insert mag, shoot thug if necessary
    I chose the Ruger P345 for just this reason. I have a 7 year old at home. My firearm is in a drawer, round cham, safety on and mag out. It only takes a couple seconds to be ready.

  4. #19
    VIP Member Array Civil_Response's Avatar
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    V-Line Top Draw safe for me.

    I'll never own another Gunvault.

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  5. #20
    Senior Member Array Mattmann's Avatar
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    Keep it loaded with nothing in the chamber? I don't know a single toddler who can lock it back and engage the slide lock?

  6. #21
    New Member Array Corlando465's Avatar
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    I thought about this situation many times when my children were little. We never kept our guns unlocked when our children were small. Children, no matter how well taught, will do things they are not supposed to when they think no one is looking. Even though there may be a risk of intruders, we never felt the risk was so great that it was necessary to leave a loaded gun outside of the safe. Never underestimate a child's abilities! A four or five year old child could easily fit a magazine into a gun, given the opportunity. Children can also be quite the climbers, so don't ever think you can place a loaded gun out of a child's reach. I just read a story today about the death of a 5 year old that found his dad's service revolver in top of the closet. How terrible! We waited until my youngest was his teens before we were comfortable keeping our pistols loaded and accessible at night but when we leave, if the weapons don't come with us, then they are unloaded or locked up. I don't think my teenager would bother them, but then again one can't be completely sure, so why even take a chance?
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  7. #22
    Distinguished Member Array claude clay's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mattmann View Post
    Keep it loaded with nothing in the chamber? I don't know a single toddler who can lock it back and engage the slide lock?
    no need to lock it back...just slide it far enough to pick up a round. murphy will see to the rest.
    ----------------

    a toddler can fire a revolver--

    they will sit cross legged on the floor and, pointing the muzzle at their chest, grasping the grips in both
    little hands, with both thumbs on the trigger--they squeeze--literally the life out of them selves.

    they will finaggle a semi...time and murphy

    no mag near the gun, no round chambered...no unwanted events.
    --time was i had 2 BHP's in different parts of the house. the wife had a mag and i had a mag.

    my daughter at age 7 was having fun the ruger 10-22 and by 10 had a S&W 34.
    she's 23 now and you can talk to her at NRA HQ. double+good range by the way.
    Last edited by claude clay; January 27th, 2012 at 01:43 AM. Reason: pesling
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    Arthritis sucks big-big
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  8. #23
    VIP Member Array chiefjason's Avatar
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    At night my G19 is in a SERPA retention holster in the nightstand drawer. In the morning it goes on my side. If the kids come to my side of the bed they wake me up. If they managed to fumble with the holster they would wake me up. Since it's a retention holster you have to engage the button to release the gun. I also teach my kids that guns are off limits unless they ask me or mom, and then we drop what we are doing and let them see the gun. Or they look at them when I am cleaning them. Just my simple solution. And I can grab the holster, engage the button in the dark, and slide the holster off the gun with the drawer; done it a few times. Luckily all false alarms.
    I prefer to live dangerously free than safely caged!

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  9. #24
    Member Array DocPMD's Avatar
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    My kids are 4 and 7. I use the V-Line Top Draw also. I don't like the idea of a safe that relies on electricity - either plug in or batteries - because Murphy's Law says you won't have power to open the safe when you need it.

    The mechanical push button system on the V-Line is great. If any buttons were pushed prior to you entering the proper sequence, when you enter the sequence it won't open. This is how I know if my kids tried to mess with the safe or not. As far as our house rules go, touching the safe gets them in as much trouble as touching on of my firearms. There has been one punishment dished out so far, and I assure you it won't happen again, if you know what I mean.

    Proper training of the kids is critical. The safe alone is not enough.

    As far as securing it goes. It can be screwed down. But my view of the safe is not to prevent theft. You need a real safe for that. The role in my house is to prevent easy access by the kids and to prevent a BG from shooting me with my own gun if he manages to get to me while I am sound asleep.

    Good luck,
    Doc
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  10. #25
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  11. #26
    Member Array Ishmael's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DocPMD View Post
    My kids are 4 and 7. I use the V-Line Top Draw also. I don't like the idea of a safe that relies on electricity - either plug in or batteries - because Murphy's Law says you won't have power to open the safe when you need it.

    The mechanical push button system on the V-Line is great. If any buttons were pushed prior to you entering the proper sequence, when you enter the sequence it won't open. This is how I know if my kids tried to mess with the safe or not. As far as our house rules go, touching the safe gets them in as much trouble as touching on of my firearms. There has been one punishment dished out so far, and I assure you it won't happen again, if you know what I mean.

    Proper training of the kids is critical. The safe alone is not enough.

    As far as securing it goes. It can be screwed down. But my view of the safe is not to prevent theft. You need a real safe for that. The role in my house is to prevent easy access by the kids and to prevent a BG from shooting me with my own gun if he manages to get to me while I am sound asleep.

    Good luck,
    Doc
    I use the V-Line safe, too, and I like it--except, I wish it locked automatically as soon as it closed. Instead, you have to turn the knob to lock it. Occasionally, I've forgotten to do so. For that reason, the only time a loaded weapon goes in it is at night, and it is in a high drawer. Even that scenario might have to change as my now two-year-old son gets bigger. I simply am not willing to rely on nothing more than my memory/attentiveness as the only thing between a child and a gun.

  12. #27
    Member Array DocPMD's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ishmael View Post
    I use the V-Line safe, too, and I like it--except, I wish it locked automatically as soon as it closed. Instead, you have to turn the knob to lock it. Occasionally, I've forgotten to do so. For that reason, the only time a loaded weapon goes in it is at night, and it is in a high drawer. Even that scenario might have to change as my now two-year-old son gets bigger. I simply am not willing to rely on nothing more than my memory/attentiveness as the only thing between a child and a gun.
    Wow, not really sure how to respond to this without looking like a jerk, so I'm just going to say it. If you can't rely on yourself to be responsible enough to secure your loaded weapon by turning a knob, you shouldn't own a firearm.

    It's a big responsibility, and even bigger when kids are around. You clearly understand that.
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  13. #28
    Member Array ctrcs's Avatar
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    If the kids are young, I like the recommendation of attaching the gun vault to a dresser or wall. This is a good thread, it made us consider your predicament think outside the box.

  14. #29
    Distinguished Member Array claude clay's Avatar
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    do you check that your socks are still on after you've tied your shoes?

    do you press check the gun you loaded this morning to make sure you did it?

    DocPMD said it already, so no need to repeat it.
    Arthritis sucks big-big
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  15. #30
    Member Array FAS1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ishmael View Post
    I use the V-Line safe, too, and I like it--except, I wish it locked automatically as soon as it closed. Instead, you have to turn the knob to lock it. Occasionally, I've forgotten to do so. For that reason, the only time a loaded weapon goes in it is at night, and it is in a high drawer. Even that scenario might have to change as my now two-year-old son gets bigger. I simply am not willing to rely on nothing more than my memory/attentiveness as the only thing between a child and a gun.
    The FAS1 SAFE locks automatically when you close it. The spring return is an option on the Simplex lock that none of the other manufacturers buy. Of course, with the gas strut pushing the door open you would know if you locked it or not even without this feature. You can see the video clip in my previous post. BTW, I have left my garage door open before when I left for work.....but only once

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