Guns and Toddlers

Guns and Toddlers

This is a discussion on Guns and Toddlers within the Home (And Away From Home) Defense Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; Hi DC I am new to DC.com, but have a question about gun safes. I have ordered (to try out) the GunVault Mini (Biometric) to ...

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  1. #1
    Member Array iKelvin's Avatar
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    Guns and Toddlers

    Hi DC

    I am new to DC.com, but have a question about gun safes. I have ordered (to try out) the GunVault Mini (Biometric) to try and see how I like it. On Amazon.com it literally has 10 5-Star reviews & 10 1-Star reviews.... so mixed in their reviews it makes it difficult to judge by those reviews.

    Now a question....

    Pt. 1: What (if any) security precautions do you have in place to keep a firearm completely safe from todlers or anything for that matter, while having it quickly accessible?

    Pt. 2: Do you keep it unloaded or loaded (if loaded: 1 in the chamber or not)


    Thanks for reading,

    Kelvin


  2. #2
    VIP Member Array joker1's Avatar
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    Welcome to the forum!

    If I'm awake my loaded (one in the chamber with a full magazine) EDC is in my holster on my hip. The holster covers the trigger so the gun is safe. I routinely wrestle 3 nephews in this mode of carry without an issue yet. When I undress for the day my pistol goes into a Homak lock box which sits on my nightstand. 5 keystrokes and I'm in the box. My wife and teenage daughter have both been shooting and know not to mess with the guns but I take the precautions anyway.

    Pistol is loaded unless I'm cleaning it.
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    With great power comes great responsibility.-Stan Lee

  3. #3
    VIP Member Array Stevew's Avatar
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    When my grandkids are around I lock up anything that is not on my body. When my kids were young I put an outside type door lock on my bedroom door and kept it locked. Needed a key to get in.
    Good people do not need laws to tell them to act responsibly, while bad people will find a way around laws. Plato

  4. #4
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    Welcome!

    As joker pointed out, on your person in a decent holster is the most secure place to have the gun in your home. If that's not possible, then your biometric safe is a good alternative. Just be religious about changing the batteries. It would be unfortunate indeed if your safe couldn't open when you needed it to, because you forgot to change the batteries.

    And there is no reason to unload the gun except for "administrative" purposes such as cleaning.
    Smitty
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  5. #5
    Ex Member Array Yoda's Avatar
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    If it is your defensive weapon and you are keeping it locked up inside the gun vault, keep it loaded with one in the chamber so that the only delay is opening the gun vault.

    I understand there may be times you would need to lock it up from children but still want to have access. A quickly accessible gun vault (there are several) is probably the best answer.

    There are numerous threads on the plusses and minuses of the various vaults as you have seen on Amazon. You can do a better search using google for things on DefensiveCarry using the following format

    site:defensivecarry.com gun vault

    where "gun vault" is your key words, try various options

    What I recall about the negatives of electronic gun safes is that the batteries were expiring too soon. Some people prefer the mechanical lock, most do not like being tied to a key; plus the kids will find a key.

  6. #6
    Member Array FAS1's Avatar
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    Biometrics can be finicky for some and work perfectly for others. Handgun safes with a pushbutton mechanical lock is a good alternative if you want to steer clear of any possible problems related to electronics. You can also Google the brand you are interested in along with the word problems or issues and you'll be able to do a little research for yourself. Welcome to DC.

  7. #7
    VIP Member Array 10thmtn's Avatar
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    I have two young children. IMHO, with kids in the home you need BOTH education about gun safety AND a gun safe.

    We have a large GunVault next to the bed. It's the pushbutton kind. I do not trust the biometric reader to work if my fingers are wet. This safe has battery backup, but works on AC power. It also has a key backup. I added strips of white duct tape under the buttons, so the keys are easily seen in a dark room (otherwise the buttons are black on black, which seems kinda silly to me).

    The pistols inside are kept fully loaded. I always have two pocket guns on me any time I am dressed. As mentioned, the best way to keep control over the guns is for them to be on you always.

    The long guns are kept in a larger safe in the corner of the bedroom. That safe requires a key, which I keep in the Gunvault.
    The more good folks carry guns, the fewer shots the crazies can get off.
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    Member Array pfries's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FAS1 View Post
    Biometrics can be finicky for some and work perfectly for others. Handgun safes with a pushbutton mechanical lock is a good alternative if you want to steer clear of any possible problems related to electronics. You can also Google the brand you are interested in along with the word problems or issues and you'll be able to do a little research for yourself. Welcome to DC.

    I have to agree I use biometrics on several things between home and work they

    have an average of a 40% percent failure to work the first time by statistics and would agree

    from personal exp. Push button would be my first choice. Not to mention with

    most if you have 3-5 failed attempts it locks you out for XX amount of time.

    Now none of this is a big deal for storage but needs to be considered in a SD

    situation, as your heart is racing and hands are sweaty and shaking things will

    get more difficult
    Mors est libertas


    MALAD JUSTED

  9. #9
    Member Array xtalman's Avatar
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    I have this safe:

    FAS1 SAFE - YouTube

    It is available here:

    FAS1 SAFE, LLC

    I compared it directly with a GunVault and a Titan safe. It has a simplex lock, and therefore requires no batteries. It is very well constructed. The metal on the FAS1 is much thicker than on the other two safes (I believe it is 7 gauge) and the piston that springs the door open also feels high quality. The only downside is that it doesn't have pre-drilled holes for mounting. The Titan has better mounting options, but the steel is much thinner and it feels like I could pry it open if I really wanted.

  10. #10
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    I think kids should be at least kindergarten age before packin'. Todlers are just too young.
    NH_Esau, WHEC724, ep1953 and 1 others like this.
    Retired USAF E-8. Lighten up and enjoy life because:
    Paranoia strikes deep, into your heart it will creep. It starts when you're always afraid... "For What It's Worth" Buffalo Springfield

  11. #11
    Member Array iKelvin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldVet View Post
    I think kids should be at least kindergarten age before packin'. Todlers are just too young.
    Sorry, were you saying I shouldn't carry having toddlers or cracking a joke about toddlers being too young to carry?

  12. #12
    Distinguished Member Array TSiWRX's Avatar
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    Don't worry too much about the online reviews, iKelvin - as with anything on the Intr4w3bz, you're going to have outliers on either end as well as "the vocal minority" effect. The GunVault Biometric units are just like anything else: some units work great, others, less-so. If you buy from a local brick-and-mortar retailer that will honor returns, that may make your life easier, albeit at the expense of a few dollars.

    In the end, no matter what locking device you choose, be sure that you drill the fail-safe access procedure, with simulated stress. I initially thought that I had my fail-safe keys hidden in what was a "perfect" place until I ran myself through a stressed-drill the next day: when I needed to break out tools to retrieve the lost keys , I realized that was going to be a no-go.

    As for childproofing, I really like these quick-access safes. For me, I currently store my defensive firearms in "Condition 1," but I keep them in simple unlined Kydex holsters while they are in the safe, so that I can be assured that when I reach in - even if it's completely dark and I'm under stress - that I don't accidentally snag the trigger. I actually take this a step further and have a simple Bianchi duty belt sitting inside the safe, rigged with the holstered gun, two spare mags and a flashlight all ready-to-go. This way, even if I'm in my PJs or just my underwear, I can simply "grab it and go" (the belt has inherent rigidity and is easy to buckle, with its industrial-sized single-clip setup) in case the alarm wakes me in the middle of the night.

    First-line safety, though, needs to be educating your children about the dangers of mishandling firearms. Do this in an age-appropriate - and even more importantly, unique-child appropriate - manner, as soon as the child starts to show un-forced interest in your firearms. The NRA's "Eddie Eagle" series is a great place to start, for youngsters. Although I did not use that system (I actually had not known about it, until later) with my daughter, my own teachings closely mirrored its contents: my daughter started showing interest when she was about 2, and I started her off right-away with a basic "don't touch - get an adult" drill.

    Demystifying "the gun," to me, is very important: showing her how firearms work and allowing her access, in a properly supervised manner, whenever she gets the urge to satisfy her own curiosity is, in my mind, key in instilling in her the proper respect for the instrument.

  13. #13
    Ex Member Array Ram Rod's Avatar
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    Pt. 1: What (if any) security precautions do you have in place to keep a firearm completely safe from todlers or anything for that matter, while having it quickly accessible?
    It's either touching me or I'm touching it (for the most part). I have no toddlers by the way, but if I did.........that's the only way it would be safe. If you can't do either of those, then lock 'em up. Last story I told about toddlers and guns involved a high ranking city law enforcement officer that went home and took off his duty belt..........toddler shot herself in the face with his duty weapon. Some things cannot be spoken, written, or conveyed. Tragedies are difficult to live with. Loss of a child due to negligence is unforgivable.
    i10casual likes this.

  14. #14
    Member Array i10casual's Avatar
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    I only use the key lock on my gun safe since toddler are sneaky as ninja and really like buttons.
    I am not as skilled as the guys on here so I don't trust just the holster to keep my toddlers fingers away from the trigger. Around my family I only carry an auto since they are very safe for a novice like me if I don't keep a bullet chambered.
    At work I keep a small revolver on my waist but leave it at work in a safe.

    Inside my home safe I keep a few mags full but outside of the gun. And I never chamber one while its in the safe. As I've said, I'm not as seasoned as most people on here and I can see myself pulling the trigger while taking the firearm out of the safe.

  15. #15
    Distinguished Member Array TSiWRX's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by i10casual View Post
    I am not as skilled as the guys on here so I don't trust just the holster to keep my toddlers fingers away from the trigger.
    ??? I'm not sure I understand this...please elaborate?

    Around my family I only carry an auto since they are very safe for a novice like me if I don't keep a bullet chambered.
    If this is how you choose to impose an extra level of safety, please remember to occasionally check your child/children's ability to pull back the slide and chamber a round.

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