Why do you send your kids to school?

This is a discussion on Why do you send your kids to school? within the Home (And Away From Home) Defense Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; If one wants to look at the safety issues of home schooling vs. public/private schools. The facts are that more children die in homes each ...

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Thread: Why do you send your kids to school?

  1. #46
    VIP Member Array farronwolf's Avatar
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    If one wants to look at the safety issues of home schooling vs. public/private schools.

    The facts are that more children die in homes each year than they do in public/private schools.

    For anyone to imply that by sending your children to school away from home they are putting their lives as risk is simple nonsense and ignores the facts. As far as the other issues, that might be debateable, but the safety issue certainly isn't.
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  3. #47
    Distinguished Member Array tcox4freedom's Avatar
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    I know of some parents in CT that may disagree with you.

  4. #48
    Senior Member Array Cold Shot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by phreddy View Post
    My oldest daughter(13) had three surgeries in the first two weeks of November. My wife has been home schooling her during her recuperation. My wife has a masters in chemical engineering and she is having a hard time. It takes special skills to teach, only one of them being intelligence.
    Teaching is quite difficult. I have a strong desire to get into the profession someday for a variety of reasons. That's probably 25 years down the road, however.

    I'm in my 20's now.
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  5. #49
    Member Array akav8er's Avatar
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    Short answer? To formally educate them and socialize them. Unfortunately homeschooling wasn't an option when our kids were in school, and not everyone is cut out for it. My wife was active duty AF and I worked to help support my family and provide for the tools (primarily education, but extracurricular) that would serve them well and help them become active well rounded members of their ultimate chosen community. We didn't always have control over where she was sent but I spent many years playing mr. mom, creating the best and safest life for them. That included where and how we lived and the private and safest Christian schools they attended. We taught them to be always be aware and to never fear raising the alarm if they ever felt threatened. By the grace of God, we made it through the parenting years with no major mishaps. Our youngest son graduated in '98 and as odd as the 90's were, they now seem like the Eisenhower years compared to today. My fear now is the challenges and threats our grandchildren will face.

  6. #50
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    Our kids started out in public school, my wife and I became alarmed as some of the "public school stories" that began to unfold. We enrolled them in a small-town private school. We are still happy with that decision.
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  7. #51
    Member Array F350_6's Avatar
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    I never considered homeshooling, but I did move to a small town with a better school district that actually cared about kids and had teachers that aren't completely sold on the liberal agenda. I always believed the social interaction at school was just as important as what they tried to teach you in the building.

    My daughter on the other hand has a different opinion. She's considering homeschooling because she doesn't trust what the schools seem to push, and doesn't like the idea of all these gun free zones. We've got a few years before she has to decide, so we'll see I guess.

  8. #52
    Member Array thechriskarel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by akav8er View Post
    Short answer? To formally educate them and socialize them. Unfortunately homeschooling wasn't an option when our kids were in school, and not everyone is cut out for it. My wife was active duty AF and I worked to help support my family and provide for the tools (primarily education, but extracurricular) that would serve them well and help them become active well rounded members of their ultimate chosen community. We didn't always have control over where she was sent but I spent many years playing mr. mom, creating the best and safest life for them. That included where and how we lived and the private and safest Christian schools they attended. We taught them to be always be aware and to never fear raising the alarm if they ever felt threatened. By the grace of God, we made it through the parenting years with no major mishaps. Our youngest son graduated in '98 and as odd as the 90's were, they now seem like the Eisenhower years compared to today. My fear now is the challenges and threats our grandchildren will face.
    this. a lot of home schooled kids grow up to be anti-social weirdos...no offense.

    anyway... what, 3 school shootings in 20 years and we stop going to public schools now? isn't that letting the criminals win?

  9. #53
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    We homeschool our children, but safety was never really one of the concerns that brought us to that decision. If we decided we had to send them to school now, it still wouldn't be one of the considerations. School shootings are such a small probability risk that I just don't worry about it.

    Our decision involved a whole range of other things, the first being that we actually CAN (we can make it on my income alone, and I recognize the privilege that represents). You can get a great education at public school (I did). It's like anything else; you get out of it what you're willing to put into it. My children happen to be getting a FANTASTIC education from my wife at home, and that is one of the major factors. It also makes our schedule for the family very flexible, and it gives us a choice in almost everything.

    Another factor is that they are not being indoctrinated into looking to the government to provide things for them like education and opportunity. They are being taught ACTIVELY that they can provide these things for themselves. The government is also not teaching them it's own version of right and wrong, which is hopelessly out of whack. They are getting OUR values, and if someone outside our family has a problem with that, that's tough.

    As far as socialization, this is not an issue for most of the homeschoolers that I know. It is largely a straw man brought up by those that oppose homeschooling, and people that stereotype them as "anti-social weirdos" are mostly clueless. Yes this happens, but not often. The cases where that is true just get a lot of press because of the agenda of those reporting on it.

    My children are involved in FAR more extracurricular activities than their public school friends including sports, music, drama, community service, etc. Relying on a public school environment to socialize your kids is sometimes like throwing them to the wolves and walking away, or throwing them into the deep end of the pool. Sometimes it works out great and makes them stronger, and sometimes it screws them up beyond all recognition. It depends on the input FROM PARENTS. My children are introduced to the complications of social interaction with lots of feedback, discussion, role playing, and analysis. It would be the same in public school, but with the activities they have as homeschoolers, they get the CHOICE of dealing with complicated and thorny social interactions in doses THEY can adjust as they need to. That works for us.

    Niether of my kids has ever been to school. They are both in high school now (daughter 11th and son 9th grade). They are smart, social, well adjusted and both of them shoot great!

    Deal with it.
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  10. #54
    Member Array Qtip's Avatar
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    GraySkies said it better than I could. I agree 100%.

    Also, my kids will be home schooled because I believe my wife and I are more capable of raising and educating our kids than any government employee. No offense intended to the awesome teachers out there.

  11. #55
    Distinguished Member Array Paymeister's Avatar
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    We homeschooled our daughter. For socialization, we were concerned that she might miss out on what public school kids get. So every couple of weeks or so we would take her into the bathroom, rough her up and take her lunch money.

    Actually, she did pretty well getting socialized by the varied contacts she had through the church and community: she wasn't cooped up with 30 other kids her same age all day. She's a marvelous college senior now.

    The real reason we homeschooled was this:


    Christ said "Give to Caesar what is Caesar's!" My daughter isn't Caesar's.


    Yes, a homeschooled kid turns out warped. So do public school kids. I would just rather have my daughter warped like my wife and me rather than the 30 other animals in the classroom.

    The Good Book says a student will become like their teacher, and they get more teaching from the peer group than the staff - both my wife and I were certificated teachers in California before we escaped. We KNOW what the schools do: without taking ANYTHING away from the highly dedicated teachers and staff (hats off to them - they're bailing the Titanic as best as they can), the system is set up to churn out disrespectful, dependent, poorly prepared, filled-with-a-sense-of-entitlement robots. And anyone worried about the technical parts of teaching can ALWAYS hire a tutor or get a book or an online program: the key part of education is that of a kid's character, and I submit that homeschool wins nearly every time.

    BUT... I also recognize that most times through no fault of their own, there will be mom-and-kid(s)-only families, and mom has to work. That's a heartbreaker and I don't see an easy way out. But be cautious about the 'we both have to work' argument: we are voluntarily on the low side of middle class (cheap mobile home in the middle of nowhere, raise part of our food, one $900 car and one $600 car), because we wanted my wife to be able to raise our daughter. Yes, I recognize that many folks are trapped by debt and the culture: if you are, work heroically towards getting out. If you're not trapped, try to stay free. You have more options that way.
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