Now the fun begins- SHTF home securty in post-flood Colorado

Now the fun begins- SHTF home securty in post-flood Colorado

This is a discussion on Now the fun begins- SHTF home securty in post-flood Colorado within the Home (And Away From Home) Defense Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; Greetings, Luckily, my unoccupied house west of Boulder survived the flooding relatively well, with just a leaking roof, standing water in the garage and a ...

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Thread: Now the fun begins- SHTF home securty in post-flood Colorado

  1. #1
    Member Array WebleyHunter's Avatar
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    Now the fun begins- SHTF home securty in post-flood Colorado

    Greetings,

    Luckily, my unoccupied house west of Boulder survived the flooding relatively well, with just a leaking roof, standing water in the garage and a collapsing portion of the driveway. My parents just moved out a month ago, and my family is going remodel and move in around the end of the year (Hopefully!). We have taken steps to make the house appear occupied with a vehicle in the driveway, lights on and a radio playing. No alarm system is currently installed, but one will be in-place by the time we move. For the short term, the main access road is blocked for "residents only" so the general riff-raff can not get passed the LEO check point, but I don't expect that to last much longer.

    Unfortunately, thousands of my fellow Coloradans are not so fortunate, and face hard choices concerning their homes. Many areas, especially in the mountains, are completely cut-off from the outside world, with only air assets able to gain access. Rescuers delivered an ultimatum of that if you don't evacuate now in the Nat Guard Chinooks and Blackhawks, that you will be stranded for weeks/months until roads can be made passable- AND winter is fast approaching.

    - Would you stay at your house? Do you have enough supplies? What about your family? What about your job/career?
    - Would you evacuate? What about all your "stuff" left behind? Would you hike back form miles over rugged terrain to check on your property?

    If was in a similar situation, I would probably stay as long as power (generator or solar)/water/food allowed. I would have to take a leave of absence from work, and send the family down the hill for safety. It also seems that since the Nat Guard could safety land helicopters, that a commercial/private helicopters could also land for emergency/medical/resupply operations.

    So far, reports of looting have been relatively few and far between, but I expect that to change once the weather improves and the disadvantaged urban throngs begin to explore.

    Please discuss.

    Thanks,

    Hunter


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    VIP Member Array Phaedrus's Avatar
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    I expect you can cancel your plans for a Mad Max sequel! But it's a tough call, for sure. I doubt most people would be prepared to ride out a winter with no power or additional supplies.
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    Senior Member Array xsigma40cal's Avatar
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    I guess that all depends if FEMA is going to remove you by force and go through your house afterwards to make there's no "contraband".
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    Quote Originally Posted by xsigma40cal View Post
    I guess that all depends if FEMA is going to remove you by force and go through your house afterwards to make sure there's no "contraband".
    If the possibility of FEMA going through your house and your belongings really exists... No doubt you've heard the old saying of mouse proofing or rat proofing... I would say your house would have to have been fortified already and rat proof already.

    I've heard plenty of crap about FEMA the last 18 years. I'd bet they think they don't need no stinkin' WARRANT to go inside your place. Act accordingly. Good Luck Webley.
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  5. #5
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    You appear to have worked out your situation well, so for starters, congratulations!

    To the alternative, those in the sticks have some tough decisions dependent on numerous factors: Location, prior preparations, expected time-lines, skill-sets, inventories of water, food, fuel, medicines, and the like, job/career pressures, financial matters, and ingress and egress. Having said that, without access, the abandoned property in the woods may be safer than a home in a small town, which presents different questions. A harsh winter might damage a property more than vandals..........Also important is the security arrangements made by LE.

    A small mountain community with a cluster of prepared owners might stay if they were prepared, but again, there are attendant risks. It is all about preparation and location.

    A similar situation arises when the Emergency Responders evac an area due to forest fires........a lot of empty homes.........
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    Tough call, but its a highly personal type of decision to make. A lot would depend on the type of job one had, family and finance situation etc.
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    Distinguished Member Array oldman45's Avatar
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    Few people can be independent for an extended period. I feel so sorry for the residents of the flooded CO areas. Many have lost all they had. Few in CO would carry flood insurance and this was a once in a long lifetime flood.

    BUt the quesiton is would I, as an indivudal, stay there for the duration. In short, Hell NO. Water is the casuse of the problem and will be a problem for those remaining. Food is seldom stocked for a month so food will be an issue. Transportation will be dificult due to roads. A simple emergency could turn into a life threatening issue. Communication may be out for weeks.

    I consider myself to have enough to last a week, using my generator but that would also require I make trips for some items that is not on hand. Due to a major storm and power outage a couple years ago, we were on our own for five days. I would have kissed those that brought us back to standards by the third day Had we not gotten back to normal, I was ready to leave the area to a motel with running water
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    VIP Member Array OutWestSystems's Avatar
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    I use to volunteer doing Water Rescue. People that don't evacuate don't just endanger themselves, they endanger the emergency response folks. Everything in that house can be replaced, people can not be replaced. People think they can handle it until it starts getting real bad then they call 911 to have someone come rescue them, now that the conditions are worse, the rescue folks have to risk their lives because someone didn't get out when they could.

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    VIP Member Array rammerjammer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OutWestSystems View Post
    I use to volunteer doing Water Rescue. People that don't evacuate don't just endanger themselves, they endanger the emergency response folks. Everything in that house can be replaced, people can not be replaced. People think they can handle it until it starts getting real bad then they call 911 to have someone come rescue them, now that the conditions are worse, the rescue folks have to risk their lives because someone didn't get out when they could.
    I would hate to have to abandon my home. But those folks who don't evacuate now should not expect any free assistance to bug out at a later date when they realize they've bitten off more than they can chew.
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    Senior Member Array BkCo1's Avatar
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    I have had to evacuate due to fires. It is not a pleasant experience. I fortunately am not affected by the floods this time. The people that had a warning had time to gather important items. Those with out a warning had no time for anything. I would not stay in this situation. There is no mail service. I get my meds by mail. There is little or no communications. There is no power. No gas. No access to the area. Your best bet is leave and hope for the best. I feel sorry for those people having to make this decision.
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    VIP Member Array tdave's Avatar
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    I've not been evacuated been cut off for a few days. Try to make your choices don't let circumstances make them for you.

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    Distinguished Member Array GunGeezer's Avatar
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    I talked to a friend in Aurora, CO. Yesterday. He said they got 18" of water in 3 days. I'd have to get me one of them floating gun safes and get out of Dodge!

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    Two key problems here. Basic survival and economic survival (especially if you own a business) probably equally weigh in the decision.

    I'd do it myself with the minimum amount of preparation due to the training and experience I've had over the years. I'd know ahead of time that it would be a cold miserable experience. I would not subject my family to it however. For those who stay in the truly isolated areas and tough it out, my guess is that any and all Hunting and Game regulations are basically out the window and anything you would want to eat, and could kill, would be the norm. Water, food, shelter (including security) and warmth covers basic survival.

    As for personal finance survival, and not having an income, or not being in a position to manage the monthly bills (no mail and most likely intenet), could end up causing long term problems. In today's world, most would have to have someone in 'the world' covering all of those aspects of finance and business issues, for long term economic survival.
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    First of all... my heart goes out to you and yours.

    If it happened to me, I'd do my best to gather up things of personal importance and leave. Insurance take care of the rest.

  15. #15
    Senior Member Array Stirling XD's Avatar
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    Get out while you can. If you can't easily drive to your place now, staying there to ride out the winter is a bad idea. There are too many things that can go wrong and help will not be coming fast. Yes, someone could bring you supplies or evacuate you by helicopter if necessary. But helicopters cost several hundred dollars an hour to operate. And they need good weather to do it. Delays may not be a big deal for resupply flights, but if you get sick or injured just as the weather turns bad, it could cost you your life. Part of being prepared is having the proper insurance on your property so that you don't have to stay behind to protect it.

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