Home Door Lock Review.... Pitiful Results....

Home Door Lock Review.... Pitiful Results....

This is a discussion on Home Door Lock Review.... Pitiful Results.... within the Home (And Away From Home) Defense Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; I had some spare time on my hands tonight so I decided to break out some old kit and test some locks... Since I have ...

Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 62
Like Tree31Likes

Thread: Home Door Lock Review.... Pitiful Results....

  1. #1
    Senior Member Array daffyduc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Nashville, TN
    Posts
    534

    Post Home Door Lock Review.... Pitiful Results....


    I had some spare time on my hands tonight so I decided to break out some old kit and test some locks...


    Since I have not really introduced myself I suppose now is as good a time as any. I am what you would call a "Grey Hat". What that essentially means is I have a BAS in Information Security and multiple IT security certs. A few years back I was approached by the company I worked for (Pharmaceutical distribution) to audit their third party logistic facilities security. Originally this was full up front shaking hands and going through paperwork and procedures. After a few of these meet and greets I suggested we take a more realistic approach, Physical Pen testing. For those of you unfamiliar with penetration testing basically this means showing up unannounced and testing their security procedures. I have done this for about 5 years now. usually its all social engineering however there is quite a bit of physical security that needs to be by-passed as well... like, tricking motion detectors on "Buzz Through" doors to let you in (involves a piece of paper and a coat hanger under the door). sometimes cloning an RFID badge ID (remarkably simple unfortunately). Of course sometimes, you just have to pick a lock.


    On with the post:

    So I decided to see how secure the rash of locks on your common house front door actually are....

    I showed up at my local home improvement store and went to work... a store employee did take interest in what I was doing, I simply replied, shopping for locks... :) I brought with me only 5 Tools (2 tension wrenches, 2 different size hook picks and a rake)

    I started on lock number 1... A cheap run of the mill handle lock... inserted the wrench and rake.... in about 4 or 5 runs (20 seconds or so) pop! no worries, its only the cheap one.... noted manufacturer and price....

    Moving right along... next lock, same story, etc.etc. after the 5th one I stopped writing them down... this was pitiful.... every one, right after the other and I had not needed more than 2 tools so far.... the wrench and the rake.... I went all the way through the display. even the $200 set... 15 seconds! one of the worst!

    These are not automatic tools mind you, I used a small tension wrench and rake pick for every one of them...

    I was very surprised to find out that not a single lock that Lowes sells took more than 40 seconds to pop open using 2 simple tools anyone can buy or make. Most were compromised in about 15-20 seconds. I picked the deadbolts too.... Not a single one passed this test... not even the pricey ones with digital keypads...

    After arriving back at home I decided to test my own locks.... It took less than a minute to let my self in through my front door without a key.

    Tomorrow I am planning to spend some time on the Smithing forums, I am sure there are better locks out there.... It just goes to show you that you may not hear a "crash in the night", you just might wake up to someone in your house with no notice of the event. Locks only give the appearance of security to the un-informed.

    For the record I use a hard deadbolt on each of my doors that can only be operated from the inside when home. I would recommend these to anyone.


    install-guardian-secure-door-lock.jpg


  2. #2
    VIP Member Array OutWestSystems's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Colorado Springs, CO
    Posts
    2,171
    I recommend a 150 lbs of dog with a bad attitude about people he doesn't know. Most doors can be kicked in with little problem. Next if they don't go in the door, there is always a window. The reality is that our houses are not even close to being secure.

  3. #3
    Distinguished Member Array GlassWolf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Columbia, SC
    Posts
    1,747
    This is how you secure an entry door (or at least how I do.)

    All steel reinforced door, with this:
    EZ Armor Ultimate Door Security - Door Jamb Reinforcement - jamb repair - Armor Concepts

    As for windows, I use ballistic glass with 8 mil secutiry film on them, with modern windows that have secure locks on them to prevent both unlocking, and opening when secured. Short of using bars over the glass, it's the next best thing.

    Combine those with wireess video surveillence and an alarm system, allowing you to see if someone is in the driveway or at any of the doors with a glance at a computer screen in the home or on your phone, and you should be fairly safe.
    I am free because I know that I alone am morally responsible for everything I do. I am free, no matter what rules surround me. If I find them tolerable, I tolerate them; if I find them too obnoxious, I break them. I am free because I know that I alone am morally responsible for everything I do.

  4. #4
    VIP Member Array ccw9mm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    27,083
    Quote Originally Posted by GlassWolf View Post
    This is how you secure an entry door (or at least how I do.)

    All steel reinforced door, with this:
    EZ Armor Ultimate Door Security - Door Jamb Reinforcement - jamb repair - Armor Concepts
    Beefing up against kicks is great, absolutely. Still doesn't get around locks being picked, though.

    My preference is for all-steel "storm" doors, with an all-steel outer screened portion, all-steel framing, beefed-up house framing in the area. Of course, that gets expensive when having to retrofit.


    OP:
    I thought there were several commercial-grade locks that are far more pick-resistant than the standard stuff we tend to find at "home improvement" retail places.
    Your best weapon is your brain. Don't leave home without it.
    Thoughts: Justifiable self defense (A.O.J.).
    Explain: How does disarming victims reduce the number of victims?
    Reason over Force: The Gun is Civilization (Marko Kloos).
    NRA, SAF, GOA, OFF, ACLDN.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Array daffyduc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Nashville, TN
    Posts
    534
    I agree.. bad guys gonna get in however having something that's inoperable from the outside means they have to force their way in.... heck if you really want access most homes only have a insulation, a water barrier and sheetrock on thier exterior walls... new bulding codes do not even require ply wood.... its a styrofoam board instead.

    at least if they kick the door in you get a wake up call first right :)

  6. #6
    Member Array B_2keys's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    156
    Great thread! Hearing this really makes you wonder how safe locking your door actually is. This is something I need to look into.
    Sister likes this.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Array daffyduc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Nashville, TN
    Posts
    534
    I have not found any pick resistant locks in the field. I only do the audits. It's up to them to make the needed changes. I am sure there are better locks out there. Most of my experience is on the software side of things. The physical end of the spectrum has only been as needed. Unfortunately 90% of the time I simply walked in, said I was here to work on the phone system. Usually the receptionist will let you into the server room. Sad isn't it.

    I'm going to start doing more research as I am getting more interested in the physical aspect of this work.

    ;)


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk - now Free
    brocktice likes this.
    "Ours is the only country deliberately founded on a good idea." ~John Gunther

  8. #8
    Distinguished Member Array GlassWolf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Columbia, SC
    Posts
    1,747
    I use dead bolts on my doors that require a key from either side to open. They've been effective thus far. I have been looking at home automation that uses a cell phone to unlock the doors from the outside. I imagine unless the thief could crack the encryption and "hack" the door locks, he wouldn't be able to pick those.
    http://www.abloyusa.com/protec_both.htm

    The problem with most keyed locks is that you can shim them and entirely bypass the tumblers.
    I am free because I know that I alone am morally responsible for everything I do. I am free, no matter what rules surround me. If I find them tolerable, I tolerate them; if I find them too obnoxious, I break them. I am free because I know that I alone am morally responsible for everything I do.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Array Old Sarge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Paradise
    Posts
    590
    Where can I purchase the Guardian manual lock you show in the inset?

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Array GraySkies's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Western Washington
    Posts
    616
    Quote Originally Posted by daffyduc View Post
    I have not found any pick resistant locks in the field.
    Spent some years as a locksmith in my younger days. I could have told you that you wouldn't find anything good at the home center.

    You can make most good brand locks MORE pick resistant though. Most higher end brands are only 5 pin from the factory as sold, but are drilled for 6 pin. If you add the 6th pin and use a longer key blank (commercial setup), you increase the pick resistance. I also put a deep cut in the front, and put deep cuts and shallow cuts next to each other when I key my locks. The last trick I use to make a normal lock more pick resistant is to replace all of the top pins with mushroom pins. Some of the padlock brands use these and are VERY hard to pick. Any normal lock with mushroom top pins gains a MUCH higher degree of pick resistance.

    Most door locks used by tract home builders have at least some masterkey top pins in them. If you remove these it helps too.

    All of these things will make your locks more pick RESISTANT, but it depends on the skill of the picker. They WILL, however, make your locks IMMUNE to lock "bumping", where the crook puts in a key blank shaved down to the deepest cut all the way across and taps on the lock while gently turning. Bumping will work on a lot of unmodified "home center" locks, but not one doctored as described above.

    All of this stuff is secondary to physically hardening your entries, though. Most crooks will still just force entry rather than trying the finesse approach. Making your locks pick resistant is just icing on the security cake. Most crooks can't do it.
    john.shewchuk and Mark_in_wi like this.
    "Freedom and discipline have come to be regarded as mutually exclusive, when in fact freedom is not at all the opposite, but the final reward of discipline" - Elisabeth Elliot

    "While they are saying, “Peace and safety!” then destruction will come upon them suddenly" 1Thess 5:3

  11. #11
    Senior Member Array daffyduc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Nashville, TN
    Posts
    534
    Quote Originally Posted by Old Sarge View Post
    Where can I purchase the Guardian manual lock you show in the inset?
    I picked mine up at Home Depot. You can probably find them online cheaper. Door guardian.

    We bought them to keep the kids in initially. They work well.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk - now Free
    "Ours is the only country deliberately founded on a good idea." ~John Gunther

  12. #12
    VIP Member Array Easy8's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    N FT Myers, FL
    Posts
    2,914
    Best thing I have found are wireless sensors you can hide outside. They shoot an invisible beam 88 feet anything crosses it a little black box beeps in your house. Now no one can get near the driveway or house without it beeping letting the little dog know someone is outside. They work with up to 5 sensors and cost a mere 69.00 from chamberlin garage doors. The senors use two aa batteries an last over a year. They are predrilled so you can attach them to anything an have a 600 foot range from black box.
    Oldpsufan likes this.

  13. #13
    Senior Member Array txron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    865
    Quote Originally Posted by OutWestSystems View Post
    I recommend a 150 lbs of dog with a bad attitude about people he doesn't know. Most doors can be kicked in with little problem. Next if they don't go in the door, there is always a window. The reality is that our houses are not even close to being secure.
    I agree completley. The smash and grab is more common than the cat burgler. I have dead bolts on all of our doors, but I know a couple of good kick and the door frame will give.
    No trees were harmed in the construction of this post. However a large number of electrons were indiscriminately aroused.

  14. #14
    VIP Member Array packinnova's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    4,297
    Quote Originally Posted by B_2keys View Post
    Great thread! Hearing this really makes you wonder how safe locking your door actually is. This is something I need to look into.
    Anyone that's had any experience "playing" with locks whether by trade or "fun" can tell you: locks keep honest people honest and that's about it. Anyone with the knowledge, time, determination, or various combinations of them will get past most locks. That's why you don't depend solely on a lock for your defense. It's just another layer to buy you some time...if you're lucky and the attackers or thieves have below average IQ's.

    I've been "playing" around with locks and entry since early elementary school. I don't do it for a profession, but it has come in handy. It was a fascination for me growing up. Half of it is common sense with a basic high school level science and math knowledge. It didn't take me long to figure out I could brute force a heavy duty padlock relatively quietly with none other than a bicycle chain lock that was wrapped around my bike frame and the seat from the bike.

    One of my employers corporate office was quite displeased a few years ago when I defeated their newfangled electronic door system for the local office with 2 cans of dustoff spray in short order.

    I took the dustoff cans from the janitors closet in an unsecured area inside the building. In other words, I got into the secured area without bringing anything in with me. Pockets were empty save a personal wallet, car keys, and a SAK which never left the pocket.

    From the time I got into the building through the unsecured outside door to being INSIDE the secured doors was sub 10 minutes according to the footage from the cameras and I didn't break or damage anything. Keep in mind that the secure floor of the building was recently remodeled at the time(while I was on a beach on vacation) and I had no prior knowledge of this closet or it's contents. I saw the "utility" label on the door and figured I'd see what was what.

    Here's the interesting bit. The system installers had apparently thought of the coat hanger and piece of paper trick. Had they not used glass panes in the door I wouldn't have even seen the sensors to know what I was working with for sure...big mistake number 1. Anywhoo, I had found coat hangers and a box of corp letterhead envelopes in the closet first and tried that. Discovered rather quickly that there were in fact TWO separate sensors on opposite sides of the doors and BOTH were required to be tripped at the same time. Round 2 - Back to the closet where I had seen the dustoff cans and the lightbulb popped in my head... Why? Because they left a gap in the doors just big enough for me to stuff the thin spray hose for the cans between the double doors... There was no security strip on the back of the doors.

    I've gotten into cars with everything from a coat hanger to
    Cars, houses, even modern computerized cars can be had quite easily and in many cases with just a few dollars in COTS parts/tools or what's already in your pants pockets.

    As to some of the lower end electronic keypad entries sold for small biz and home use... Just say no. Why? Some are NOT controlled/programmed offsite by the vendor or locked up in a fashion to prevent reprogramming on site. I was locked out of one of our labs on another floor last year when they had changed the code(no I didn't get the pink slip) right before a holiday weekend. I pulled the wall plate and found a manufacturer stamp on the back of the device. A bit of google-fu with my phone and found the manufactures were kind enough to post the reprogramming instructions in the clear on the interwebs. And worse yet, it could be done RIGHT AT THE KEYPAD ITSELF!

    Needless to say that was replaced and its now also a 2-factor auth for entry to at least slow someone down a bit since they're too cheap to have an actual guard roam the building.

    "Badge/Keycard" readers? Given that RFID has been successfully cloned at up to 3 meters, now all those stupid badge readers everyone uses are pretty much useless... Granted that one takes a good bit more electronics knowledge so it's not going to be your average idiot smash and grabber...

    A hilarious statement from one of our corp peeps when I tried to explain in a way they would understand(and this isn't MY JOB but I figure if it costs the company then it costs me in the long run):
    "Wait, you mean someone can wait around outside with a group of smokers when we walk out of the office for the day with a small, cheap, and easy to program off the shelf parts in a coat pocket, copy my keycard ...that's IN MY WALLET when I walk by you in the crowd. Then you go home and program a new card for yourself and return and let yourself in the next day?" ...yep.

    Everyone should burn this into their brains: Thinking a lock somehow makes you safe is like thinking a "gun free zone" sign makes you safe... Well, I suppose you could steal the sign and stuff it under your shirt... It might stop a .22?
    "My God David, We're a Civilized society."

    "Sure, As long as the machines are workin' and you can call 911. But you take those things away, you throw people in the dark, and you scare the crap out of them; no more rules...You'll see how primitive they can get."
    -The Mist (2007)

  15. #15
    VIP Member Array packinnova's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    4,297
    Forgot to add...
    Any of you have a garage door with a remote?
    How old is your house?
    Have you replaced the garage door unit since you moved in with a newer rolling code type system?
    ...Just a thought
    "My God David, We're a Civilized society."

    "Sure, As long as the machines are workin' and you can call 911. But you take those things away, you throw people in the dark, and you scare the crap out of them; no more rules...You'll see how primitive they can get."
    -The Mist (2007)

Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

7 mm security film youtube
,

door guardian lock reviews

,

door guardian lowes

,

lowes door guardian

,
lowes the door guardian
,
school door security locks
,
where to by a lock tension wrench in jacksonville, fl
Click on a term to search for related topics.