Recommendation for Doors and Locks

Recommendation for Doors and Locks

This is a discussion on Recommendation for Doors and Locks within the Home (And Away From Home) Defense Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; Greetings! We are remodeling my family's mountain home (built in the 60's) and I need recommendations for a secure front door and a good lock/deadbolt ...

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Thread: Recommendation for Doors and Locks

  1. #1
    Senior Member Array WebleyHunter's Avatar
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    Recommendation for Doors and Locks

    Greetings!

    We are remodeling my family's mountain home (built in the 60's) and I need recommendations for a secure front door and a good lock/deadbolt set.

    A few criteria:

    - The front door should be a 36" solid plank type door, with no recessed panels that weaken the structure. It could be a veneer over particle board, but I would prefer solid wood.

    - The window should be a high and small "speakeasy" style- impossible to break and still reach the dead bolt. I am amazed how many doors just have a thin piece of glass between outside and the latch.

    - The lock set should be high quality, resist picking and "bumping", and be strong enough to stop simple kicks.

    Thanks for your input!

    Hunter


  2. #2
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    You might consider an "architectural" steel door and jamb unit. Not sure what the market offers, but there are products out there (just bring $).

    Stay away from Home Depot and hardware stores for quality locks - they simply are not sold there. Go to a standalone locksmith for recommendations.

    If you use conventional exterior doors, consider that the hinges are the next "mechanical fuse" after your heavy-duty deadbolt lock and reinforced strike. The hinges themselves are usually OK, but they are commonly mounted on both door and jamb side with screws that are not very robust. Especially on the jamb side, you want screws that will go beyond the first framing member and well into the second. If you've ever seen a door kicked in, almost always the hinges remain attached to the door but are ripped from the jamb.
    OldVet, 5lima30ret and Taurahe like this.
    Smitty
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  3. #3
    VIP Member Array oakchas's Avatar
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    Try these:
    Let me google that for you

    Sorry for the snarky reply... well, not really...

    The most important criteria is lacking... how much do you want to spend for said door? You can meet the criteria for a few hunnert easy... But there are many options... We have delivery will you pick up do you want cheap or easy or both...
    Rats!
    It could be worse!
    I suppose

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    Senior Member Array WebleyHunter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oakchas View Post
    Yes- very helpful...

    I thought that the wise persons on this board might be willing to SHARE their experiences with said products.

    Yippee- 200th post!
    Taurahe likes this.

  5. #5
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    I thought that the wise persons on this board might be willing to SHARE their experiences with said products.
    Stay tuned. By this time tomorrow you'll probably have a lot more replies, possibly some with direct experience and recommendations for you.
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    Smitty
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    VIP Member Array shadowwalker's Avatar
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    When door is installed most folks forget about protecting the hinges also you should think about strengthening up 16 to 24 inches on each side of door I did 30 inches on mine and as gasmitty said get real hardware for locks and jams.
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  7. #7
    VIP Member Array oakchas's Avatar
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    IIRC, someone here got one of these:

    Mahogany RM1 Rustic Knotty Door RM1* | Most Popular Exterior Doors

    There is someone on EBAY selling them in oak...
    Rats!
    It could be worse!
    I suppose

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by gasmitty View Post
    You might consider an "architectural" steel door and jamb unit. Not sure what the market offers, but there are products out there (just bring $).

    Stay away from Home Depot and hardware stores for quality locks - they simply are not sold there. Go to a standalone locksmith for recommendations.

    If you use conventional exterior doors, consider that the hinges are the next "mechanical fuse" after your heavy-duty deadbolt lock and reinforced strike. The hinges themselves are usually OK, but they are commonly mounted on both door and jamb side with screws that are not very robust. Especially on the jamb side, you want screws that will go beyond the first framing member and well into the second. If you've ever seen a door kicked in, almost always the hinges remain attached to the door but are ripped from the jamb.

    Good idea with steel door. He also may want to check building salvage companies. They would have both steel doors and the old solid wood type. I have a steel front door and I pulled all the screws out of door hinges and replaced them with epoxy dripping 4" screws.

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    My door got kicked and the hinges held up fine. The area around the deadbolt and latch not so well. Most burglars are not going to stand there and keep kicking if other homes are near because it attracts attention.

    Door jam reinforcements are readily available at places such as this:

    http://kickproof.com/

    While I would recommend a steel door and frame over wood every time, much can be done to wood door/frames to make than almost as secure, if you want to invest in the right items. My busted door jam looked exact like the one on the website above.
    Retired USAF E-8. Lighten up and enjoy life because:
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    Home Page - Mul-T-lock

    Mul-t-lock is a great lock and you need a code for a locksmith to make keys . Very expensive lock but worth it , they have padlocks and door locks .

    The doors i cannot help you with .
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    Member Array Vuva3rae's Avatar
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    A good choice is a lock that operates with rotating discs instead of pin tumblers, like the Abus Granit (Abus Plus/Abus X-Plus) or the Abloy locks. Alternatively use a lock that does not only rely on pin tumbler locking mechanisms, like Medeco, Assa Twin, Chubb AVA or Evva 3KS.

  12. #12
    Member Array rahmann62's Avatar
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    I am friends with a guy who works for a hi end window/door distributor. He was telling me about doors they have that the bolt system is a three point lock. When engaged, it puts a bolt through the jam by the knob, and at each the top and bottom of the door.

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    Some cabins deep in the woods out here have roller shutters: Roller shutter - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Probably the most secure........Google "roller shutters" and you'll see a bunch of vendors and choices.
    OldVet likes this.


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    Senior Member Array WebleyHunter's Avatar
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    Thanks!

    I will review the postings and products indicated.

    Great wealth of knowledge and experience here!

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    Distinguished Member Array 5lima30ret's Avatar
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    I agree with the others to stay away from the box store locks. One conclusion that I have come to after kicking in my fair share of doors is that the fiberglass ones are much more difficult to breach than the typical box store steel clad doors. Also be sure to replace the typical short cheap screws that typically come installed on pre-hung doors. Replace them with GOOD 3" wood screws that extend through the jamb into the framing. Good luck!
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