Pit Bull Shot Three Times [including once in the head]; Still Charges Officers - Page 3

Pit Bull Shot Three Times [including once in the head]; Still Charges Officers

This is a discussion on Pit Bull Shot Three Times [including once in the head]; Still Charges Officers within the Law Enforcement, Military & Homeland Security Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; Originally Posted by dukalmighty It never fails to amaze me when litigants are in court for a dog bite complaint,the Judge asks what kind of ...

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 31 to 45 of 52

Thread: Pit Bull Shot Three Times [including once in the head]; Still Charges Officers

  1. #31
    Senior Member Array Sig35seven's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    1,115
    Quote Originally Posted by dukalmighty View Post
    It never fails to amaze me when litigants are in court for a dog bite complaint,the Judge asks what kind of dog and the owners say it was an american staffordshire terrier or some such drivel,the Judge looks at them and says you mean a pitbull and they reply well yea that's what they are referred to
    Kinda like this guy.

    pets.jpg
    "Confidence is food for the wise man but liquor for the fool"


  2. #32
    Ex Member Array Treo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    1,098
    Quote Originally Posted by Sig35seven View Post
    According to the Clifton study, pit bulls, Rottweilers, Presa Canarios and their mixes are responsible for 74% of attacks that were included in the study, 68% of the attacks upon children, 82% of the attacks upon adults, 65% of the deaths, and 68% of the maimings. In more than two-thirds of the cases included in the study, the life-threatening or fatal attack was apparently the first known dangerous behavior by the animal in question. Clifton states:

    “If almost any other dog has a bad moment, someone may get bitten, but will not be maimed for life or killed, and the actuarial risk is accordingly reasonable. If a pit bull terrier or a Rottweiler has a bad moment, often someone is maimed or killed—and that has now created off-the-chart actuarial risk, for which the dogs as well as their victims are paying the price.”

    /http://www.dogbitelaw.com/
    Thank you for providing your cites I will read up on them.

    ETA
    This is anecdotal but the only pit that I’ve ever run into that was a problem (it really wasn’t vicious) was clearly the owner’s fault we were riding in a truck and the owner kept egging the dog on to bite me and after about a minute of it I put my pistol to the dog’s head and told the owner that if the dog actually bit me I was going to kill it.

    The dog’s behavior was modified rather quickly

  3. #33
    VIP Member
    Array OPFOR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Nomad
    Posts
    4,713
    No worries, Ex, I figured you were just yanking some chains. Unfortunately, though, not everyone gets the joke, and we therefore (perhaps unwittingly) can promote and maintain stereotypes/misinformation.

    I had to kill a number of dogs while in Afghanistan; a wild pack that was endangering folks at our FOB, a few "guard dogs" at target sites, and one that was attached to my RTO's ankle. All except the last were done with rifles, and most of THOSE were with 7.62x51N. I can say with certainty that dogs can be hard to kill...

    As an aside, the one that I shot with a pistol got 5 rounds of 9mm 124gr NATO ball, all to the lower chest and abdomen. They were all through-and-through (dog weighed about 45 lbs). It yelped, jumped back, fell over, and died after about 15 seconds or so.

    As a dog lover, I really didn't like having to put down any of them (even the one using my RTO as a chew toy), but they ARE (at least in these cases) wild animals who posed a real danger to human beings. Sometimes things just have to be done.
    A man fires a rifle for many years, and he goes to war. And afterward he turns the rifle in at the armory, and he believes he's finished with the rifle. But no matter what else he might do with his hands - love a woman, build a house, change his son's diaper - his hands remember the rifle.

  4. #34
    Administrator
    Array SIXTO's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    20,363
    Quote Originally Posted by Deuce130 View Post
    Garbage? I think not. Sorry to raise your hackles by daring to criticize a controversial LEO tactic. How does one "suddenly" open a garage door? Especially one that is already partially open? Still no evidence in the story to indicate the dog was intentionally released to interfere or attack a police officer. No evidence to indicate the suspect even knew the police were there. Somehow, you read the same article and came to that conclusion. You can believe whatever you wish...rational, thinking people know that this situation could have been avoided.
    So... how could it have been avoided? There was execution of a legal search warrant and the homeowner used the dog as a weapon. Unfortunately, the dog paid the price. I'm not sure what else could have been done, and the 'no knock' factor was not a factor at all in this.
    "Just blame Sixto"

  5. #35
    Moderator
    Array buckeye .45's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    7,887
    Quote Originally Posted by OPFOR View Post

    I had to kill a number of dogs while in Afghanistan; a wild pack that was endangering folks at our FOB, a few "guard dogs" at target sites, and one that was attached to my RTO's ankle. All except the last were done with rifles, and most of THOSE were with 7.62x51N. I can say with certainty that dogs can be hard to kill...

    As an aside, the one that I shot with a pistol got 5 rounds of 9mm 124gr NATO ball, all to the lower chest and abdomen. They were all through-and-through (dog weighed about 45 lbs). It yelped, jumped back, fell over, and died after about 15 seconds or so.

    As a dog lover, I really didn't like having to put down any of them (even the one using my RTO as a chew toy), but they ARE (at least in these cases) wild animals who posed a real danger to human beings. Sometimes things just have to be done.
    Those Afghan dogs are worse than any Pit-bull I have ever seen, and mean. The best defense against them we found was a dog that hung out around our base (He had been saved from Afghans trying to kill him by Marines). He was one of those big cropped ear, cropped tails, henna in the fur fighters. He would demolish any other dog in our AO, and even take on several at once. He ran point with me on foot patrols, keeping the dogs away while I scanned for IEDs. It's a shame they wouldn't let any of us adopt him, but I am sure he is still running point with our replacements.

    Having to shoot dogs sucks, but if you have to do it, no matter what caliber, its probably going to take a couple well placed shops, unless you get lucky and it runs off after the first.
    Fortes Fortuna Juvat

    Former, USMC 0311, OIF/OEF vet
    NRA Pistol/Rifle/Shotgun/Reloading Instructor, RSO, Ohio CHL Instructor

  6. #36
    VIP Member
    Array OPFOR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Nomad
    Posts
    4,713
    Indeed. From what we can infer, the officers hadn't even reached the entry point to knock or not. And I fail to see how (actually, I know exactly how) one can't understand the concept here. A partially open garage door - say, one open a few inches from the ground - is pulled further open when the BG sees the officer(s) approaching, releasing a dog that the owner could only reasonably believe would then go after the officer(s). The dog does as the owner/BG desires, charging an approaching officer. Officer shoots to stop the threat.

    At no point does the method of entry or time between knocking and entry even come into question - THEY NEVER GOT TO THE ENTRY POINTS. This didn't happen inside the house, this wasn't some surprised lap dog sleeping peacefully until the police crashed through the doors of his doggy house, this was a BG using his dog as a weapon to delay/attack police there to serve a warrant.

    Only someone with a HUGE agenda (based on what, I have yet to understand) could possibly turn this into an anti-NKW screed...
    A man fires a rifle for many years, and he goes to war. And afterward he turns the rifle in at the armory, and he believes he's finished with the rifle. But no matter what else he might do with his hands - love a woman, build a house, change his son's diaper - his hands remember the rifle.

  7. #37
    VIP Member
    Array OPFOR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Nomad
    Posts
    4,713
    Quote Originally Posted by buckeyeLCPL View Post
    Those Afghan dogs are worse than any Pit-bull I have ever seen, and mean. The best defense against them we found was a dog that hung out around our base (He had been saved from Afghans trying to kill him by Marines). He was one of those big cropped ear, cropped tails, henna in the fur fighters. He would demolish any other dog in our AO, and even take on several at once. He ran point with me on foot patrols, keeping the dogs away while I scanned for IEDs. It's a shame they wouldn't let any of us adopt him, but I am sure he is still running point with our replacements.

    Having to shoot dogs sucks, but if you have to do it, no matter what caliber, its probably going to take a couple well placed shops, unless you get lucky and it runs off after the first.
    I actually DID adopt and bring home one of them; we found her as a very young pup, and she accompanied us on many missions during our tour. We'd use her to go into those low, Soviet-built ammo storage tunnels/bunkers that riddled our AO - mostly to clear out any other critters that might have taken up residence, but also to alert us to any two-legged threats that might be holed up in there. She was mean as hell if she didn't know you, but she served me and the platoon well. I was very lucky to be able to get her out; I was among the last (if not THE last) that was able to use the vet services at Bagram to get her vaccinated and cleared for travel. Plus, I shelled out the greenbacks...

    She was one of those curl-tailed, almost Spitz looking ones, not those monsters that you're talking about. We had some close encounters with those huge dogs that the Hazara nomads kept us guards/fighters, and they were some scary pooches... In the early days of my tour we were running soft-skins with no doors, and you better believe I pulled my feet WAY inside the HMMWV when those guys came out sniffing/chasing us!
    A man fires a rifle for many years, and he goes to war. And afterward he turns the rifle in at the armory, and he believes he's finished with the rifle. But no matter what else he might do with his hands - love a woman, build a house, change his son's diaper - his hands remember the rifle.

  8. #38
    VIP Member Array ExSoldier's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Coral Gables, FL
    Posts
    5,802
    Quote Originally Posted by OPFOR View Post
    No worries, Ex, I figured you were just yanking some chains. Unfortunately, though, not everyone gets the joke, and we therefore (perhaps unwittingly) can promote and maintain stereotypes/misinformation.

    I had to kill a number of dogs while in Afghanistan; a wild pack that was endangering folks at our FOB, a few "guard dogs" at target sites, and one that was attached to my RTO's ankle. All except the last were done with rifles, and most of THOSE were with 7.62x51N. I can say with certainty that dogs can be hard to kill...

    As an aside, the one that I shot with a pistol got 5 rounds of 9mm 124gr NATO ball, all to the lower chest and abdomen. They were all through-and-through (dog weighed about 45 lbs). It yelped, jumped back, fell over, and died after about 15 seconds or so.

    As a dog lover, I really didn't like having to put down any of them (even the one using my RTO as a chew toy), but they ARE (at least in these cases) wild animals who posed a real danger to human beings. Sometimes things just have to be done.
    Whenever we walk our two Newfoundlands around the neighborhood, I always carry a 45, loaded with MAGSAFE or GLASER Silver. There was a killer Akita roaming the neighborhood awhile back and it nearly killed a friends Great Pyrenees which is no small pooch! The culprit in that attack was driven off after being beaten by a 2x4. I had a friend respond to another attack be running up to the dog that attacked a kid and screwing the PPKs he was carrying into the dogs ear and pulling the trigger three times. That solved the issue. That's what I'd do in similar circumstances. I wouldn't bother with body shots. I was wondering though if the police had ever considered TASING a dog or even just using the pepper spray which works on bears (just saw the news story on FOX) well enough...
    Former Army Infantry Captain; 25 yrs as an NRA Certified Instructor; Avid practitioner of the martial art: KLIK-PAO.

  9. #39
    Member Array jdjon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Columbia, South Carolina
    Posts
    23
    USMCJ,

    You got it RIGHT!
    SLED Certified CWP Instructor, NRA Certified Instructor, Range Safety Officer, NRA Recruiter, Affiliate Instructor Armed Citizens Legal Defense Network, member NRA,USCCA,GOA,GrassRootsSC.
    Be Safe,
    Jim

  10. #40
    Administrator
    Array SIXTO's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    20,363
    Quote Originally Posted by buckeyeLCPL View Post
    Those Afghan dogs are worse than any Pit-bull I have ever seen, and mean. The best defense against them we found was a dog that hung out around our base (He had been saved from Afghans trying to kill him by Marines). He was one of those big cropped ear, cropped tails, henna in the fur fighters. He would demolish any other dog in our AO, and even take on several at once. He ran point with me on foot patrols, keeping the dogs away while I scanned for IEDs. It's a shame they wouldn't let any of us adopt him, but I am sure he is still running point with our replacements.

    Having to shoot dogs sucks, but if you have to do it, no matter what caliber, its probably going to take a couple well placed shops, unless you get lucky and it runs off after the first.
    Do you happen to have any pictures of these dogs? I've heard a few other guys talk about them, and I'm curious to see what they actually look like.
    "Just blame Sixto"

  11. #41
    VIP Member
    Array OPFOR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Nomad
    Posts
    4,713
    A man fires a rifle for many years, and he goes to war. And afterward he turns the rifle in at the armory, and he believes he's finished with the rifle. But no matter what else he might do with his hands - love a woman, build a house, change his son's diaper - his hands remember the rifle.

  12. #42
    Administrator
    Array SIXTO's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    20,363
    Huh, interesting. A "Heinz 57" dog for sure. I was picturing more of a monster Dingo. Anyway, we better get back on topic, thanks for sharing though.
    "Just blame Sixto"

  13. #43
    VIP Member Array jwhite75's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    West Virginia
    Posts
    5,319
    First off...I agree with OPFOR...usually those who say the NKW was unnecessary, and the cops shouldnt have had to shoot the dog has never been in a situation like this. You are already amped up looking for some one who harmed othe persons, and no regard for humans, and then a dog charges you wanting to eat you for lunch. There is no time travel up the force continuum til something works. You STOP THE THREAT...period.

    Second....OPFOR that is a handsome dog. I am sure he is a loyal companion.
    Friends don't let friends be MALL NINJAS.


    I am just as nice as anyone lets me be and can be just as mean as anyone makes me. - Quoted from Terryger, New member to our forum.

  14. #44
    VIP Member
    Array OPFOR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Nomad
    Posts
    4,713
    Yes, she was and is an awesome dog, and has calmed down a great deal since leaving A-stan... For a good while, she was very aggressive towards anyone she didn't know - it was to the point where I thought I would have to put her down, and I couldn't let her around other people. Now, after a lot of socialization, she is much more of a "normal" domesticated animal. I'm still very careful with her, especially around new people, as anyone should be with a potentially dangerous animal.

    And SIXTO, there are other "breeds" over there as well. The ones buckeye (I believe) is talking about are much larger, short haired, and look a little bit like huge boxers (though the ones I encountered were usually fawns). Their ears and tails are usually cropped (or chewed off), and they are intimidating. We usually ran into them in Hazara camps - the Pashto didn't seem to have any. To get WAY off topic, the Afghans in general don't keep dogs as "pets," they are considered unclean and are generally treated VERY poorly. In Kabul especially, the wild dogs and dog packs have been responsible for a LOT of attacks, maimings, and deaths. Baghdad was similar but not quite as bad - they began an eradication program after a number of children were mauled.

    All that said - "release the hounds" at police while they're serving a warrant, and expect your dog to die. No one I know is going to let themselves be attacked by ANY dog bigger than a teacup poodle without trying their darndest to stop the threat.
    A man fires a rifle for many years, and he goes to war. And afterward he turns the rifle in at the armory, and he believes he's finished with the rifle. But no matter what else he might do with his hands - love a woman, build a house, change his son's diaper - his hands remember the rifle.

  15. #45
    VIP Member Array Guns and more's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Fl
    Posts
    2,391
    I have no sympathy for any owner that treats their dogs like they are weapons.
    You mean like police dogs?

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. source for meth head shot 33 times
    By NaturalSelection in forum Defensive Ammunition & Ballistics
    Replies: 47
    Last Post: November 24th, 2013, 10:55 AM
  2. Shot in the head five or six times. Accident, or "on purpose?"
    By BruceGibson in forum In the News: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: February 24th, 2011, 08:04 PM
  3. Ugly: 6 People, Including Child, Shot On Parade Route
    By JonInNY in forum In the News: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: February 24th, 2009, 06:41 PM
  4. Bad guy gets shot 22 times - 17 COM with a .40 but still shoots a cop 4 times(merged)
    By razz in forum In the News: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
    Replies: 57
    Last Post: January 10th, 2009, 11:52 PM
  5. Charges dropped in killing of pit bull
    By Tom357 in forum In the News: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: December 19th, 2005, 01:52 AM

Search tags for this page

.380 kill pitbull

,
a pitbull with three heads
,
a pittbull with three heads
,
aaron sheperd ne
,

aaron sheperd omaha ne

,

aaron sheperd omaha, ne

,
can a 380 caliber stop a pitbull
,
pit bull shot omaha ne
,
pit bulls in homeland security
,
pitbull shot in the head and still lives
,
pitbull shot indiana
,
pitbullshotin head and lives
,
three times bull stock
,
why is the glock 357 sig a good pit bull killer
,
will a .380 stop a pit bull
Click on a term to search for related topics.