New military rifle: XM25 - Page 2

New military rifle: XM25

This is a discussion on New military rifle: XM25 within the Law Enforcement, Military & Homeland Security Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; Originally Posted by SIGguy229 I'm still leery of any weapon that requires batteries. Those who have BTDT know that issue batteries (or proprietary batteries) rarely ...

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Thread: New military rifle: XM25

  1. #16
    VIP Member Array ctsketch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SIGguy229 View Post
    I'm still leery of any weapon that requires batteries. Those who have BTDT know that issue batteries (or proprietary batteries) rarely if at all last as long as advertised past a couple of dozen charges. So now you have to carry heavier ammo and batteries to make it work?
    the issue is with recharging. the proper way to deal with these batteries is to let them drain completely then switch them out with a backup battery while recharging the other. Only then will you get the lifetime estimated.
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    VIP Member Array paaiyan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ctsketch View Post
    for the record...my paintball gun has a computer chip....cost $75
    Does it have a computer chip with a housing designed to withstand being fired from a gun, nearly instantaneously being accelerated to several hundred feet per second? Does that chip possess the capability to be wirelessly updated, presumably through RFID, with the information about distance to travel before detonating, and then to make the proper calculations so that the device detonates at precisely the right moment?

    I've used plenty of paintball guns with chips in them, and they couldn't do that. I'm not saying it's going to be thousands of dollars per round of ammunition, but I wouldn't be surprised if the cost was upwards of $200-400.
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  3. #18
    VIP Member Array ctsketch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by paaiyan View Post
    Does it have a computer chip with a housing designed to withstand being fired from a gun, nearly instantaneously being accelerated to several hundred feet per second? Does that chip possess the capability to be wirelessly updated, presumably through RFID, with the information about distance to travel before detonating, and then to make the proper calculations so that the device detonates at precisely the right moment?

    I've used plenty of paintball guns with chips in them, and they couldn't do that. I'm not saying it's going to be thousands of dollars per round of ammunition, but I wouldn't be surprised if the cost was upwards of $200-400.
    compared to the cost of the entire weapon, it still seems minimal, but however my chip is meant to be water resistant, drop proof and operates the trigger mechanism magnetically without itself being effected and also assists the timing of the action to fire 18 rounds/second without chopping.
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  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by ctsketch View Post
    the issue is with recharging. the proper way to deal with these batteries is to let them drain completely then switch them out with a backup battery while recharging the other. Only then will you get the lifetime estimated.
    Sounds simple doesn't it? However, suppose you don't have enough chargers for the weapons you have or enough power to charge all of the batteries needed? Or if you run short on time between missions? Operational realities trump whatever "charging plan" you can come up with.
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  5. #20
    VIP Member Array ctsketch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SIGguy229 View Post
    Sounds simple doesn't it? However, suppose you don't have enough chargers for the weapons you have or enough power to charge all of the batteries needed? Or if you run short on time between missions? Operational realities trump whatever "charging plan" you can come up with.
    I agree, there are tons of scenarios you can sit about where this may not work. but I also realize this is a weapon designed for certain situations, and the battery will not always be in use. but Murphy's law comes in to mind, with any weapon system. the most complicated rechargeable I have used for surveying. very complex system. The battery could last for days with hours of constant use. And it was old. was cheaper than the above proposed price. surely for the price above they can come up with something as reliable if not more reliable.
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  6. #21
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    Impressive weapon system, How hard is it to learn to laze targets with this weapon ? Hate to see this weapon fall into the wrong hands, or does the weapon have safe guards built in so only the soldier can fire it ?

    " While highly sophisticated, is so easy to use that soldiers become proficient within minutes.

    "That's how intuitively easy it is, even though it's high-tech," Lehner said. "All a soldier needs to know how to do is laze the target. It decimates anything within its lethal radius."
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    Most laser range finders/designators are as simple as looking through a tube and pushing a button. Anyone could likely figure this weapon out given a few minutes and a rudimentary understanding of similar devices. I doubt very seriously that there are any extra safeguards - the safeguards are that the BGs can't manufacture the ammo, so they'd only have what they could steal/capture.
    A man fires a rifle for many years, and he goes to war. And afterward he turns the rifle in at the armory, and he believes he's finished with the rifle. But no matter what else he might do with his hands - love a woman, build a house, change his son's diaper - his hands remember the rifle.

  8. #23
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    Forget the batteries; strap a solar panel on the poor GI's back. What's a few more lbs? Save the battery for a rainy day.
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  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by paaiyan View Post
    Does it have a computer chip with a housing designed to withstand being fired from a gun, nearly instantaneously being accelerated to several hundred feet per second? Does that chip possess the capability to be wirelessly updated, presumably through RFID, with the information about distance to travel before detonating, and then to make the proper calculations so that the device detonates at precisely the right moment?
    The projectile has been demonstrated to withstand the shock long ago, so yes. It's not "updated," the range to detonation is set prior to firing (Target window 100 mtrs, detonate 101 mtrs). The building/wall/obstacle isn't going to change distance.
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  10. #25
    VIP Member Array paaiyan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldVet View Post
    It's not "updated," the range to detonation is set prior to firing (Target window 100 mtrs, detonate 101 mtrs). The building/wall/obstacle isn't going to change distance.
    No no, I meant it has to be updated with the range whilst in the magazine/chamber, which will likely be done via RFID. Of course it's not done while it's hurtling through the air, but unless you have a large box of ammunition with pre-programmed ranges, the projectile needs to be sent that information at some point.
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  11. #26
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    Definitely a game changer but HERE'S what I want to carry into battle.

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    If the weapon performs mechanically and the rounds are reliable then the petty stuff like recharging and battery life will be worked out. The minutiae can always be overcome or made non issue with the proper application of brain sweat and money.
    Last edited by luvmy40; November 29th, 2010 at 08:44 PM. Reason: semantics
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  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldVet View Post
    Forget the batteries; strap a solar panel on the poor GI's back. What's a few more lbs? Save the battery for a rainy day.
    Ounces = pounds
    pounds = pain

    What is in the poor grunt's pack? Things that butterbars who think like that think we need. Ammo, chow, water, poncho. (This is in jest OldVet, I know you have done your time)

    My battle gear alone without any sort of pack was over 65 pounds, between kevlar, plate carrier with plates, 40mm rounds, 5.56 rounds, optics and water. And I did one mounted op in Afghanistan, everything else was dismounted.

    Looks like a good weapon system, us Jarheads will get it in about 15 years when the Army is tired of it.
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  13. #28
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    Ah...no hiding??? Where's the fun in that?
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  14. #29
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    It is not a rifle, though. It is a squad weapon.

    If I was fighting in Afghanistan, I would want a FN SCAR Mk 17.




    8 lbs is a lot more manageable than 12 lbs.

  15. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by buckeyeLCPL View Post

    Looks like a good weapon system, us Jarheads will get it in about 15 years when the Army is tired of it.

    But why is it that the Army almost always gets the new stuff first???

    I've never understood that.

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