requesting Advice from our retired military here - Page 3

requesting Advice from our retired military here

This is a discussion on requesting Advice from our retired military here within the Law Enforcement, Military & Homeland Security Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; Originally Posted by goldshellback Doodle, for 100K I'd move to Barrows Point, Alaska I may very well PM you on this further...... That actually sounds ...

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Thread: requesting Advice from our retired military here

  1. #31
    Ex Member Array Doodle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by goldshellback View Post
    Doodle, for 100K I'd move to Barrows Point, Alaska I may very well PM you on this further......

    That actually sounds pretty good. My 'imeadiate' plans are to do what I can to stay in this area, at least until my youngest daughter graduates HS (she's a junior).

    My brother works and lives in the Houston area (Shell pipline I believe) and is doing pretty good too. However, 'She-Who-Must-Be-Obeyed' is setting the goals for me to attempt to follow and I understand her reasoning. Her family lives close by, our children have grown up here and relocating our austistic 8YO would be a 'challenge' at first. Having grown up in south Louisiana and being closer to my family would be good, and a significant pay increase would make that decision to relocate easier for all of us to swallow.

    WHEC724, I haven't considered ATC but by no means would I rule that out either
    Well with a decent electronics background you'll do well here, NOV likes ex military and the benifits are awesome. PM at your leisure as my direct bosses are who would be doing the hiring. Houston's economy is pretty well recession proof with all of the oil and gas companies here. FYI the training that I am going through here is so marketable they are giving techs 20K bonuses to make it through their 2 year contract. Anpother tech who does exactly what I am in process of training for just got picked up by an international company making 230K/year working 1 month on and 1 month off.


  2. #32
    Ex Member Array Doodle's Avatar
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    Oh yeah, the down side:
    At 40 hrs per week while in training for 6 months you don't make much money
    As a tech in the field if your a good tech expect to travel up to 300 days a year.
    goldshellback likes this.

  3. #33
    Member Array Gladius's Avatar
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    When my kid brother retired from the Army, they took him aside about 6 months out and annotated every little thing he had wrong with him after 21 years of active service and four combat theaters. Needless to say, he has had almost no problems with his service related medical issues. He requested and received certified copies of all of his medical and dental records and copies (I suppose from Army HQ in D.C.) of his service record.

    I on the other hand was given my 'seps' physical from the Marine Corps @ NAS Willow Grove in 1989 and when I requested certified copies of my medical and dental records was told, "....No can do". I was also told that my SRB copies would be available via microfiche after I retired. Questions about the truth of this and whether there might be a faster way to get copies, were not entertained. The Comment I got when I separated was, "Well, you were good when you enlisted and you're good to go now". Needless to say, I wasn't 'good to go'. Thirteen years and numerous requests later, being asked to comment on the care I'd received from the VA when I hadn't received ANY care at all, kind of left a sour taste in my mouth.

    Years later and finally finding that one gem who really cared because her own husband had gone through the wringer, got attention and evaluation. I'm now 90% physically disabled from old injuries and exposure that deteriorated my body over time.

    So Yeah, make sure you get copies of EVERYTHING you can think of. You may have no problems at all. On the other hand, you might have a bunch.

    Don't get me wrong, I'm in NO WAY bitter. Just had a longer than usual time getting things done. I'd do my service time all over again if they'd let me, no questions asked.

    Semper Fi,
    USMC Retired

  4. #34
    VIP Member Array First Sgt's Avatar
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    Others ahead of me on this thread have given you excellent advice concerning records, resumes, etc. Now let me kinda give you MY perspective (Air Force retiree) when it came to military life and the adjustment to civilian life.



    Let me try to sum it up...


    Occasionally, I venture back to one or another military post where I'm greeted by an imposing security guard who looks carefully at my identification card, hands it back and says, "Have a good day, Sergeant!"

    Every time I go back to any Military Base it feels good to be called by my previous rank, but odd to be in civilian clothes, walking among the servicemen and servicewomen going about their duties as I once did, many years ago.

    The military is a comfort zone for anyone who has ever worn the uniform. It's a place where you know the rules and know they are enforced -- a place where everybody is busy, but not too busy to take care of business.

    Because there exists behind the gates of every military facility an institutional understanding of respect, order, uniformity, accountability and dedication that becomes part of your marrow and never, ever leaves you.

    Personally, I miss the fact that you always knew where you stood in the military, and who you were dealing with. That's because you could read somebody's uniform from 20 feet away and know the score.

    Service personnel wear their careers on their uniforms, so to speak.
    When you approach each other, you can read their name tag, examine their rank and, if they are in dress uniform, read their ribbons and know where they've served.

    I miss all those little things you take for granted when you're in the ranks, like breaking starch on a set of fatigues fresh from the laundry and standing in a perfectly straight line military formation that looks like a mirror as it stretches to the endless horizon.

    I miss the sight of troops marching in the early morning mist, the sound of boot heels thumping in unison on the tarmac, the bark of drill instructors and the sing-song answers from the squads as they pass by in review.

    To romanticize military service is to be far removed from its reality, because it's very serious business -- especially in times of war.

    But I miss the salutes I'd throw at officers and the crisp returns as we criss-crossed paths.

    I miss the smell of jet fuel hanging heavily on the night air and the sound of engines roaring down runways and disappearing into the clouds.

    I even miss the hurry-up-and-wait mentality that enlisted men gripe about constantly, a masterful invention that bonded people more than they'll ever know or admit.

    I miss people taking off their hats when they enter a building, speaking directly and clearly to others and never showing disrespect for rank, race, religion or gender.

    Mostly, I miss being a small cog in a machine so complex it constantly circumnavigates the Earth and so simple it feeds everyone on time, three times a day, on the ground, in the air or at sea.

    Mostly, I don't know anyone who has served who regrets it, and doesn't feel a sense of pride when they pass through those gates and re-enter the world they left behind with their youth.

    Face it guys - I think we all miss it............Whether you had one tour or a career, it shaped your life.

    YOU WILL MISS IT.. THE GOOD TIMES AND THE BAD.. YOU WILL FIND OUT THAT CIVILIANS CAN NOT RELATE TO YOUR PAST LIFE AND IT WILL BE FRUSTRATING TO YOU. PREPARE YOURSELF FOR THE MENTAL UPS AND DOWN WHILE ADJUSTING TO CIVILIAN LIFE.. GOOD LUCK!!!

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    Sometimes in life you have to stand your ground. It's a hard lesson to learn and even most adults don't get it, but in the end only I can be responsible for my life. If faced with any type of adversity, only I can overcome it. Waiting for someone else to take responsibility is a long fruitless wait.

  5. #35
    VIP Member Array goldshellback's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by First Sgt View Post
    I even miss the hurry-up-and-wait mentality that enlisted men gripe about constantly, a masterful invention that bonded people more than they'll ever know or admit.
    I believe your right, I'll miss the service and the comfort of 'knowing'........





    but the "hurry-up-and-wait"............ Dang I dislike that having to 'wait' to get something done!

    Great post First Sgt !
    "Just getting a concealed carry permit means you haven't commited a crime yet. CCP holders commit crimes." Daniel Vice, senior attorney for the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence, quoted on Fox & Friends, 8 Jul, 2008

    (Sometimes) "a fight avioded is a fight won." ... claude clay

  6. #36
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    Dang. Ya got me, First Sgt. I dearly miss the smell of JP-5 and the warm exhaust blast from a helo on a cold pre-dawn morning. It's a shame that they don't have a program to let us old farts take another swing once our kids are grown and gone.
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  7. #37
    Member Array Arisin Wind's Avatar
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    Yes sir. I miss the military life every day. It's a different world out here. After 13 years I still miss it.
    Be not far from me, for trouble is near; For there is none to help. psalm22:11

  8. #38
    Ex Member Array Doodle's Avatar
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    I truly don't think I will ever meet a higher caliber more driven group as engineering department on board the USS Miami. That's what I miss.

  9. #39
    Distinguished Member Array Brady's Avatar
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    I've been out 16 years now and there are still certain sounds and certain smells that instantly take me back to a time and place from years ago. And it always takes me by surprise. Yep, I still miss it. Good luck to you.
    goldshellback likes this.
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  10. #40
    VIP Member Array boricua's Avatar
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    First Sgt, you nailed it! Great post.
    Duty, Honor, Country...MEDIC!!!
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  11. #41
    Senior Member Array gwhall57's Avatar
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    I was medically discharged for diabetes many, many years ago. Understand that the VA, although it is supposed to be a veteran's advocate, is actually in an adversarial relationship with veterans - you will have to fight for every benefit. Do get help from any veterans' service organization (D.A.V., American Legion, etc.) with any VA claims - all offer free assistance, and you don't have to be a member to get help. Definitely get a copy of both your complete medical record and your complete military personnel file. Make sure your personnel file is complete - lists all training, deployments, awards, etc. You might think about also scanning your records, so you have a digital copy. As a current DOD civilian, I make the "commercials" ( Command Information Spots) for AFN. The latest spots all point exiting service members toward "Turbo-TAP" (Transition Assistance Program). Go to Transition Assistance Program for info on transitioning to your new civilian career. Thanks for your service, and welcome home!
    goldshellback and msgt/ret like this.
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  12. #42
    Senior Member Array wjh2657's Avatar
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    I retired in 1988 from the USMC as a Master Gunnery Sergeant E-9. I completed 30 years active duty so I maxed the retirement pay. I was healthy although I had served in many hazardous jobs and almost a decade in actual combat.

    My approach to retirement was totally different from other service members posting here. I looked at everything I did in my life as "phases" of a Master Plan for life.

    Phase I was childhood and high school. I graduated, so Phase I was completed.

    Phase II was the Marine Corps and I completed that with retirement.

    Right after retirement (within 1 month) I was a Freshman at Tennessee Tech University. This was Phase III and I graduated from there in 1992. Completing that phase.

    Phase IV was my career in High School Teaching . I completed a Masters Degree from TTU during that phase . I retired from teaching with a State Pension in 2006, thereby completing that phase.

    I am now in Phase V, which is civilian retirement. There may be further developments in that phase, I don't know, but I am open to new experiences.

    When I was in the Marine Corps I was a hard-a** NCO and I believe a good Marine.

    When I was in College, I was a college student, running with college kids (including being a member of a fraternity) and enjoying the whole college experience without trying to do everything the "Marine Way" but just being a college student. I was a good student (Magna Cum Laude) and active socially, pretty good at Rugby!

    When I was a teacher, I taught the way I had learned at college and was into the whole High School experience ( a little coaching, working the ticket booths at games, chaperone at proms etc.) My closest friends were other teachers. I attended all of the Band concerts, student drama presentations, etc. My life was as a teacher doing things the teacher way.

    Once I left Corps, I never returned to a base, I didn't chum around that much with veterans (unless they were teachers) nor sat around wishing I was back in the service. I loved my service time but it was now behind me.

    Tri-Care and Medicare (I am 68 and wife is 71) takes care of our medical costs and I use a community doctor who is also a very good friend. When I was teaching, I had Blue Cross/Blue Shield and AFLAC. I had a quad by-pass while teaching and the cost to me was zero dollars.

    Due to my Graduate degree and my years of teaching I am addressed as "Mr. Hofman" by most adults so I lost no status nor respect from leaving the Corps.

    By pursing a new career and a new community of friends several times, I felt rejuvenated in my life path. I wasn't any kind of "used to be" and the need for new effort to learn new things each time kept my mind on a forward path.


    The only problem I had is that my wife misses the service! In the military, we lived in a "bubble" middle class community that just doesn't exist out here. In that community, everybody is employed and most people are pretty close to the same in their income . In many ways, life was less complicated and she had more friends. There is no such community out here.




    This way has worked for me, it may not work for others. To each his own.
    goldshellback likes this.
    Retired Marine, Retired School Teacher, Independent voter, Goldwater Conservative.

  13. #43
    VIP Member Array goldshellback's Avatar
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    It hit me for the first time last night..............
    I live just four miles from base and while I was outside with a cup of coffee letting my pooches do their business I heard it...... off in the distance, but clear as a bell in the cool stillness of a January evening... TAPS. A small part of me was screaming to stop, face the colors, and render honors...... but I wasn't on base nor will I wear the uniform again, on or off base.

    DD-214 is signed.

    I stand relieved of the watch. Funny feeling that is............











    Alrighty then..............
    "Just getting a concealed carry permit means you haven't commited a crime yet. CCP holders commit crimes." Daniel Vice, senior attorney for the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence, quoted on Fox & Friends, 8 Jul, 2008

    (Sometimes) "a fight avioded is a fight won." ... claude clay

  14. #44
    Senior Member Array mano3's Avatar
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    I punched-out at 21 years from the USAF - no complaints what-so-ever!

    Make a copy of you medical/dental records for yourself.

    Have AMVETS go through your medical records. They will streamline the VA medical process for you for FREE. You'd be suprised how much 20 years in the military takes a toll on your body. Even if they give you 0% for something, that means you can get care and medicine for that problem for the rest of your life!

    Try to obtain a copy of every TDY order - I deal with this everyday at work with vets trying to prove they were on duty at some loctaion, but they have no proof!

    Make an account and resume on USA Jobs.gov. That's the civil service job finder. Vets get preference, but you HAVE to be registered on this site to be selected. The computer scans for key words in your resume, so make sure you tailor it to what job you're interested in.

    Good Luck and thank you for your service.
    US Air Force, 1986 - 2007

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  15. #45
    VIP Member Array Smitty901's Avatar
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    Lot of good stuff so far. I might add get on with life . I still do PT everyday and remain in better shape than men half my age. I leave the Army behind me except when around others I know served. Have my dress uniform all ready to go to be buried in, I do not plan on that any time soon. One stage of life is over time for another one .
    goldshellback likes this.

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