China Rising: The Economist

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    Post China Rising: The Economist



    This appears to be none other than the SKS? Any others ideas?

    I have not read the article yet, but it is bound to be interesting:

    China

    Twenty years ago, China’s military might lay primarily in the enormous numbers of people under arms; their main task was to fight an enemy face-to-face or occupy territory. The PLA is still the largest army in the world, with an active force of 2.3m. But China’s real military strength increasingly lies elsewhere.

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    Ex Member Array Yankeejib's Avatar
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    At this point, they could spend dollars to buy however many of whatever rifle they want. SKS would be my third choice.

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    Methinks the Chinese economy is not nearly as booming as most people think it is. They have some serious financial problems that they manage to keep fairly well hidden.

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    It's hard to reach the full potential with an oppressed populace.
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    Well they are sure buying up all the American and other countries oil that can be bought.

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    Distinguished Member Array Toorop's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeFriday View Post
    It's hard to reach the full potential with an oppressed populace.
    Seems like the Germans had no problem, the English had no problem, the Spaniards had no problem, and numerous other people had no problem doing so throughout history.

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    Member Array JoeFriday's Avatar
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    With the exception of Germany, I would call the others far from economic powerhouses. If Germany was still split, even they could be a different story. I have personally talked to someone that lived in East Germany, and they shared a story of gloom before the unification.

    Did they have their day at one time? Sure, every dog has its day, but the question is whether or not it is temporary or lasting. I also think you would have a hard time comparing the oppression within China to others.

    The real threat from China is whether or not they are successful in getting the rest of the world to replace the dollar as the world trade currency. If that happens, we could have problems. Britain didn't fare so well after they were replaced by the dollar.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeFriday View Post
    It's hard to reach the full potential with an oppressed populace.
    Full potential for what? We are shipping dollars to the mainland by the boatload, whilst standing line to borrow it back. Beyond border defense, China doesn't even need a military.
    "When you have to shoot, shoot, don't talk."
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    Reports are that China is rapidly increasing its naval forces which helps them extend more power and influence over the region. And they can use all the financial resources they desire to continue to increase all of their military. It's not like they have to answer to the people.
    Hopyard likes this.

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    China's economic power could well wan as their populace ages faster than many other countries. Something to put in your wok and think about.

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    VIP Member Array wmhawth's Avatar
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    I think China's boom will eventually be dampered down a bit with some of the social demands that are sure to happen as an enlightened work force becomes more and more aware of and desirous of working conditions, pay, and lifestyles of western workers.
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    Senior Member Array highvoltage's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeFriday View Post
    It's hard to reach the full potential with an oppressed populace.
    Don't underestimate them.
    goldshellback likes this.

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    One thing that I sure don't ever want to see is a Chinese Million Man March into the United States.
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    VIP Member Array goldshellback's Avatar
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    The final paragraph...... "General Yao says the gap between American and Chinese forces is “at least 30, maybe 50, years”. “China”, she says, “has no need to be a military peer of the US. But perhaps by the time we do become a peer competitor the leadership of both countries will have the wisdom to deal with the problem.” The global security of the next few decades will depend on her hope being realised."

    The time line IS closer than that I believe...... I give it 20 to 35 years. China is 'expanding' it's influence and will continue. It'll slow down that is certin, but forward motion will be a constant. The General also seems to have faith in the future leaderships of both countries coming to terms with each other........ and refered to it as a 'problem'. Intresting mind-set there.........

    China has put to sea an aircraft carrier, several more are going to be added to their fleet soon as well. Their submarines have already made their presence 'known' to our surface groups operating in, and around, that AOR. China is 'venturing out'.

    They already are a 'super power' in a sense, but have yet to 'really' put that into play. Their just dipping their collective 'toes in the water' for now.......

    What scares me is China's ability to be patient, practice, and learn. They are not making the mistakes the former USSR made when they expanded their influence after WW II.

    No, China is not to be underestimated, nor over-estimated.
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    Member Array JoeFriday's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike1956 View Post
    Full potential for what? We are shipping dollars to the mainland by the boatload, whilst standing line to borrow it back. Beyond border defense, China doesn't even need a military.
    Japan was still feudal when Admiral Perry landed there in 1868 if I remember the year right. Within ~70 years, they were a top military power followed by becoming a top exporter all with no natural resources. During WWII, Japan marched through China to capture Manchuria and a source of natural resources. Compare that to China today who has had control of natural resources the whole time.

    Shipping dollars or not, China is far from what it could be. By sheer size alone, if they had the capabilities of either the US or Japan or Germany, it would be a different story. That's full potential, and it should be a little scary.

    The US economy has transformed from widgets being the dominate force to services. When the transition happens to services, of course you will have to get your widgets from somewhere because the US output cannot meet demand, and we would see hyper inflation unlike anything we've seen before if we didn't import.

    US government debt is a whole other topic.
    Hopyard likes this.

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