Military suicide policy would try to remove personal firearms - Page 3

Military suicide policy would try to remove personal firearms

This is a discussion on Military suicide policy would try to remove personal firearms within the Law Enforcement, Military & Homeland Security Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; Originally Posted by OldVet I simply can't understand the reason behind all the suicides. I only knew of one during my "tour" and that was ...

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Thread: Military suicide policy would try to remove personal firearms

  1. #31
    Distinguished Member Array CIBMike's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldVet View Post
    I simply can't understand the reason behind all the suicides. I only knew of one during my "tour" and that was a guy going through a divorce, not extended, repeditive tours of combat. Was it like this during other wars and we just weren't aware of it?
    Most likley it was like this during other wars OldVet it's just that now the military is putting a face to it and making sure every soldier is aware of it.Unfortunatley all the awarness training that has been going on for the last few years hasn't lowerd the suicide rate.I actually was responsible for giving the suicide awarness/prevention class at the last unit i belonged to before i retired,it's not a good feeling knowing it didn't help much.
    The easy way is always mined.


  2. #32
    Member Array steffen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CIBMike View Post
    Most likley it was like this during other wars OldVet it's just that now the military is putting a face to it and making sure every soldier is aware of it.Unfortunatley all the awarness training that has been going on for the last few years hasn't lowerd the suicide rate.I actually was responsible for giving the suicide awarness/prevention class at the last unit i belonged to before i retired,it's not a good feeling knowing it didn't help much.
    Having gone through the Air Force version of the training, I wouldn't say is useless or in any way not helpful. Fortunately I haven't had to use the training with any friends or co-workers, but I'm confident that the training would help me identify someone who is at-risk and get them with a medical professional. Now, what happens after that is on the individual's leadership, and its really tough for them to get it right 100% of the time.

  3. #33
    Senior Member Array Phillep Harding's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by suntzu View Post
    ... but chose to wait until he got his firearms back..
    He knew they were being returned and chose to wait. He probably would have chosen a different method had he known they were not being returned.

    There were certainly enough dangerous chemicals, tools, and situations around when I was in. The only way someone could have been protected from all of that would have been to lock him up. (My personal evaluation as a result of having incurable cancer.)

  4. #34
    Distinguished Member Array BigStick's Avatar
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    This may just be me, but I feel like parts of the message conflict. They want to make it seem like it's ok to ask for help, and does not make you weak, but then as soon as you identify yourself, they want to take away your guns? Won't knowing that they will take away your guns further scare people away from coming forward and make them feel like they will be marked or labeled?

    It feels like a bait and switch deal to me.
    Walk softly ...

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigStick View Post
    This may just be me, but I feel like parts of the message conflict. They want to make it seem like it's ok to ask for help, and does not make you weak, but then as soon as you identify yourself, they want to take away your guns? Won't knowing that they will take away your guns further scare people away from coming forward and make them feel like they will be marked or labeled?

    It feels like a bait and switch deal to me.
    Well, that conundrum happens in the civilian world as well. On the one hand we encourage people to open up to their
    physicians and therapists about suicidal ideation, yet OTOH in some jurisdictions, that can be enough to get you a
    short mental hold with the consequent loss of rights and brief loss of freedom.

    There is a certain "diplomacy" that needs to be deployed when communicating with health care providers so that your
    problem gets noted and tended to, but you don't stigmatize yourself.
    If the Union is once severed, the line of separation will grow wider and wider, and the controversies which are now debated and settled in the halls of legislation will then be tried in fields of battle and determined by the sword.
    Andrew Jackson

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