Toxic NCOs

This is a discussion on Toxic NCOs within the Law Enforcement, Military & Homeland Security Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; I am trying to picture this situation in my head and just can't picture it. Is the OP saying 1SG's, CO's et al are pulling ...

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 31 to 40 of 40
Like Tree22Likes

Thread: Toxic NCOs

  1. #31
    VIP Member Array suntzu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    TX/NH
    Posts
    5,552
    I am trying to picture this situation in my head and just can't picture it. Is the OP saying 1SG's, CO's et al are pulling a shift every now and then or are pulling regular shifts on guard duty? There is a difference. Now, I did not have to deal with "troops" since I was a SSG because I went SF and all you had were NCO's. But being in CZ's I did see Platton Sergeants, 1SG's, Officers pull gaurd duty. Not as the norm but if there was a unique circumstance. I did it during Desert Storm before I went SF as a Platoon Sergeant. PFC Smith was suppose to be on guard duty while CPL Jone was suppose to fly but was sick and the only person avialable with enough crew rest was PFC Smith. So PFC Smith flew the mission, CPL Jones was sick puking his guts out, so I filled in half the shift until the manning was sufficient to have someone do the rest.

    I can not fathom an Army unit where it is the norm for the 1SG and CO to pull guard duty. In fact, I would classify it as dysfunctional and poor leadership.

    Here is a more mundane example: Platoon is short of soldiers and they have motor pool day. The Platoon Sergeants vehicle's assigned driver is not there as well as many other soldiers. The Platoon Sergeant should be doing the weekly PMCS and not assigning it to another soldier. If the Platoon Sergeant has no pressing business then he can assist newer soldiers and their team leaders in PMCSing thier vehicles. It is a good way of getting the work done, ensuring that the troops see you getting your hands dirty, and also check on how well your team leaders are performing in teaching basic skills to the newer soldiers. Good face time with the troops also.,
    Then I heard the voice of the Lord saying, “Whom shall I send? And who will go for us?”
    And I said, “Here am I. Send me!”

    Isaiah 6:8

  2. Remove Ads

  3. #32
    VIP Member Array ghost tracker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Ky Backwoods
    Posts
    3,812
    It's not that NCOs have changed so much, it's the candy-butted raw material they now get the dubious, difficult task of turning into fighting men. Go join the Peace Corp.
    There are only TWO kinds of people in this world; those who describe the world as filled with two kinds of people...and those who don't.

  4. #33
    Member Array DroidGeorge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Fort Smith, Arkansas
    Posts
    151

    Re: Toxic NCOs

    Perhaps a class I had to attend in the Marines - "how to keep your men from shooting you in the back" (yes it was a real class) would help.

    Rule #1 put brain in gear before putting foot in mouth.
    Another important one was you don't eat until ALL of your men are fed first.
    And most of all, don't run up to the front with your sword and yell 'charge!'

    And another class you learned a lot from "how to write that letter to the next of kin".

    George
    Smile. It makes people wonder what you are up to

  5. #34
    VIP Member Array dukalmighty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    texas
    Posts
    15,094
    I thought it was some kind of new MRE's he was concerned about
    "Outside of the killings, Washington has one of the lowest crime rates in the country,"
    --Mayor Marion Barry, Washington , DC .

  6. #35
    VIP Member
    Array OldVet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    S. Florida, north of the Miami mess, south of the Mouse trap
    Posts
    14,581
    A little war story from back in the day regarding COs.

    I was stationed in interior Alaska with A-10s and we were having a heck of a time with leaking nose landing gear struts due to the extreme cold (constant -15 and below). Every night we ended up working all night long in an unheated hanger, tearing the struts apart and rebuilding them. One night about two a.m. I felt a "presence" looking over my shoulder. The Wing Commander no less! He'd been monitoring the maintenance radio channel and heard yet once again about a failed nose strut and wanted to see what was going on.

    My hydraulic guy showed him to failed parts and explained in detail what was involved in the repair. The WC asked why we didn't turn up the heat. Ah ha! I took him over to the two huge heater that were blowing out cold air and told him we'd had work orders submitted since last winter.

    The next morning CE was there fixing the heaters, which raised the temp to at least 35 degrees. One of the better COs he was.
    Retired USAF E-8. Avatar is OldVet from days long gone. Oh, to be young again.
    Paranoia strikes deep, into your heart it will creep. It starts when you're always afraid... "For What It's Worth" Buffalo Springfield

  7. #36
    VIP Member Array ghost tracker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Ky Backwoods
    Posts
    3,812
    In my Swiss Army Knife career I've had dozens of (supposed) superiors but only three, maybe four genuinely inspirational leader/bosses. IMHO, the character, courage, humility & dedication to be that man (or woman) is a rare skill-set. It's unrealistic to believe that every NCO will have it. Nor will every LEO be honest, every politician be dishonest or every cowboy be John Wayne.
    There are only TWO kinds of people in this world; those who describe the world as filled with two kinds of people...and those who don't.

  8. #37
    VIP Member
    Array OldVet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    S. Florida, north of the Miami mess, south of the Mouse trap
    Posts
    14,581
    Leave the Duke out of this!
    Retired USAF E-8. Avatar is OldVet from days long gone. Oh, to be young again.
    Paranoia strikes deep, into your heart it will creep. It starts when you're always afraid... "For What It's Worth" Buffalo Springfield

  9. #38
    VIP Member Array Smitty901's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    3,096
    Duty assignment through out your progression in rank are what develop you. It it works right you should have paid your dues to move one step right or one forward.
    You gain the experience of what every soldiers duty is.
    Many have no idea the load many NCO's carry. I had always said the every time you were pinned it meant less sleep less down time .
    Few soldiers knew that while they were resting for that next mission NCO's were still up preparing.
    Home station or deployed 1SG had every single issue with any soldier or his family in front of him on top of other duties.
    Not crying about just fact. It was one thing to fill in for Top now and then. The day I stood in front of A company as their 1 SG. I looked right at 5, E7's That I knew were better than me for the job I had served with them at different times. For a second I though some one really messed up. Then it was on with the duty.
    Nothing in the Army infantry is fair. On 3 deployments due to strength shortages, I watch Nco's time and time again forgo leave so lower ranking soldiers could go home .
    Most not all NCO's got there for a reason and it was not the good old by net worked. Not allowed to use the words The that came when I ask why I was chosen.
    It was not because I was a nice guy

  10. #39
    Distinguished Member
    Array skysoldier29's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Miami Florida / Michigan
    Posts
    1,240
    Quote Originally Posted by SpencerB View Post
    Alright guys I am in a leadership position and put myself on guard to be fair with my soldiers and set a good example.
    I show them that I am not above them & I am a soldier too.
    I am by no means complaining about working. I am putting out here how this other unit is doing it. I get that some people do it differently but, I like taking care of my soldiers and I am by no means lazy.
    I just think that these NCO's from this unit are being lazy and not setting a good example. I understand some people won't agree with that but I lead by example and work my ass off for my soldiers.
    Here is my two cents on the situation as I get promoted to the senior NCO ranks in approx 2 hours and reenlist indef. There are good NCOs and their are bad NCOs out there. Those who are taking care of their soldiers leading by example and take an interest in the well being of their soldiers will produce good soldiers. Those who do no are more likely setting up their soldiers to fail. The only thing you can do is make sure you are doing the right thing as an NCO and taking care of your soldiers so they can do the mission. Good mentoring and leaders that "lead by example" will set up their respective services for success by breeding quality junior NCOs to take on the missions our military has coming down the road. Bottom line take care of your soldiers, do what you need to do for your soldiers and to complete your mission and don't get discouraged by the actions of other NCOs around you.
    "Where's the kaboom? There was supposed to be an earth-shattering kaboom!" - Marvin the Martian

    Sig Sauer P250 2Sum 9mm, P250c 9mm - Glock 23 - Springfield Armory Loaded .45, XD Service 9mm - Ruger LCP, LCR, Smith & Wesson 638

    NRA Member

  11. #40
    Senior Member Array Beans's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    AZ Border Territory,
    Posts
    1,002
    IIRC During the dangerous hours Dusk to Dawn the troops were pulling 4 on 4 off guard shifts. they were sleeping on the off time. As a SSGT I was up at least once during thier shift checking on their well being ETC so that ment I was getting 2 hours of sleep when possible every four hours. AWWW the bennies of being a Staff NCO
    Last to eat, Last to the PX, Meeting with the CO,XO ETC while the troops slept, eat, Trying to get more better gear for the troops, Extra meals for the troops, enough water, trying to find out why a troopie isn't getting mail from home and it is causing a problem, leader, mentor, a listening ear, and the biggest one, givng orders that may get someone killed.

    Where was the soft billet, the long nights filled with sleep. The lack of work, that the NCO's had before I became an NCO? then again maybe it was a matter of perception. YOU THINK!!!!!!!
    Flashbacks:
    It is better that I have flashbacks about them, then them having flashbacks about me


    USMC RET 1961-1971

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

are ncos supposed to yell at other ncos in front of their solders

,

army lazy nco

,
e5 army lazy
,

lazy ncos

,

lazy ncos in the army

,
my ncos are lazy
,
nco's not pulling guard
,
stupid nco
,

toxic 1sg

,

toxic nco

,
toxic nco s
,
why are ncos so lazy
Click on a term to search for related topics.