Active Shooter response Training

Active Shooter response Training

This is a discussion on Active Shooter response Training within the Law Enforcement, Military & Homeland Security Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; As I indicated previously, I am participating in "Active Shooter Response Training" with the Gwinnett County Police Dept as a volunteer. Since the story has ...

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Thread: Active Shooter response Training

  1. #1
    VIP Member Array high pockets's Avatar
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    Active Shooter response Training

    As I indicated previously, I am participating in "Active Shooter Response Training" with the Gwinnett County Police Dept as a volunteer. Since the story has now hit the media, I feel more comfortable posting this material.

    News story: Gwinnett County trains to deal with active shooter situation - CBS46 News

    “Active Shooter” training – Gwinnett County, GA

    A week ago, Friday was Day 1 of the “Active Shooter” training for GCPD and GCFD. I had been under the mistaken impression that I would learn what is expected of students and teachers caught in such a situation. I learned differently when I came back on Monday. The training being held is to train the Police and Fire Departments how to work together to a) Eliminate the threat, b) Rescue, remove and treat as many victims as possible, and c) Get Police and FD working together to keep each other alive and uninjured.

    General Specifications:
    High School of 3,800 students
    We are restricted to about 1/3 of the facility since activities are ongoing all summer.
    3 scenarios/day
    Shooter/s (Police Officers)
    Injured persons (Volunteers)
    Uninjured persons (Volunteers)
    Police personnel
    Fire Department Paramedics

    14-20 “injured” persons scattered over 2 floors, mostly laying in corridors, some in rooms.
    10 “uninjured” persons scattered around building.

    Scenario begins with radio calls

    Police arrive on scene

    Contact team enters building, looking for shooter/s. Multiple “contact “ teams enter building until shooter is located and neutralized. “Contact” teams seem to consist of two to five Police Officers.

    (“shooter/s” begin firing shots and running through hallways)

    Search teams then enter the building to search for wounded and non-wounded personnel. As they are located, they are either escorted from building, or located for “Rescue” team attention. As shooting subsides, “Contact” teams become “Search” teams as necessary.

    As more officers arrive on scene, they form more teams and enter building, moving throughout building, searching rooms.
    As each team of officers encounters injured people, they report count and location via radio and continue on, ignoring the victims.
    (we “victims” were encouraged to do everything possible, short of grabbing an officer, to distract him/her from his/her assignment.)
    As part of the building is secured, the “Rescue” teams enter building. “Rescue” teams consist of Paramedics, escorted by a teams of police officers.
    Paramedics remove exposed injured persons to cover and performed various basic triage.
    (I had simulated femoral artery wound, and was dragged everywhere. Boy! Do they wish I had been on my diet longer! )
    Once victims are stabilized (as much as can be with only very basic treatment tools) they are moved to an exit and prepared for removal to hospital transportation.
    Paramedics and victims are escorted from the building to the transportation units (FD Rescue Ambulance, in our case)
    Upon arrival at the ambulance, we victims experience a miraculous recovery and remove ourselves to the staging area to prepare for the next exercise.

    This training is scheduled to continue through mid-July so that the entire GCPD and GCFD will receive training.

    Thursday was Media Day, so things were really kind of wild.
    "If you make something idiot proof, someone will make a better idiot."

    - Anon


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    Distinguished Member Array Hoganbeg's Avatar
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    A good insight to the ongoing preparations. I'm happy to hear they are working the plan. Congratulations on your survival!

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    Member Array CaptSmith's Avatar
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    High pockets...was there any training on ICS for the volunteers ??....great to see money being spent on training...

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    VIP Member Array high pockets's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CaptSmith View Post
    High pockets...was there any training on ICS for the volunteers ??....great to see money being spent on training...
    Not sure what you mean by ICS, but no real training for volunteers. We do get a briefing prior to each scenario. Mostly we are assigned various rubber wounds, and are told that if it is a chest or belly wound, we cannot walk, a lower leg wound we are supposed to hobble and put all weight on EMT assisting; upper leg and/or multiple leg wounds are also non-ambulatory. We are supposed to do all we can to distract and/or redirect the EMTs to another patient, saying things like "I'm not hurt bad, but my student/friend is hurt worse, help them first."

    I keep messing with their heads by doing things like going into simulated shock. That really seems to get their attention. Friday, I played a dazed and injured teacher. I kept asking why all the students were in the halls and telling the police officers there was no running allowed in the halls. We also have stunned people wandering around, getting in the way, and failing to fully to respond to officer's instructions. We have been instructed to make it as realistic as possible.

    The officers are using simunitions, so everyone must wear protective headgear. They are very concerned that the volunteers not get hurt.

    One thing they have told us is that if we are being dragged, carried, or assisted, once we come to a stairwell we are miraculously, and temporarily cured, and we get up and walk down the stairs. At the bottom, all injuries are back on, and the EMTs are once again carrying, and dragging "victims" to the collection point.

    This past Friday, one of the referees really made an impression on a team of officers by yelling at them, "Do you hear those shots? Every shot you hear means a child is dying!"

    Talk about motivation!! It really made an impression on me!!!
    "If you make something idiot proof, someone will make a better idiot."

    - Anon

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    Good to see LE doing something proactive rather than ticketing parked cars. A warm fuzzy for Gwinnett County LE and the volunteers!
    Retired USAF E-8. Lighten up and enjoy life because:
    Paranoia strikes deep, into your heart it will creep. It starts when you're always afraid... "For What It's Worth" Buffalo Springfield

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    Member Array LtBlue425's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldVet View Post
    Good to see LE doing something proactive rather than ticketing parked cars. A warm fuzzy for Gwinnett County LE and the volunteers!
    Training is the only way to prepare to react to the future. No other way to do it. Tactics have been continually evolving since Columbine which is good. What the OP outlined seems to be the latest evolution which now involves tactical medics and/or other medical first responders into the scene to save lives. The latest is copied from the military experience in the sandbox. Establish a protected FOB inside to start treating the wounded even if shooting is still going on elsewhere inside.

    Also good to see fire personnel involved finally. Our local FD had it in their contract they couldn't be forced to go into dangerous situations. Not sure if they still have that or not.

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