Marines - I need your help - Page 2

Marines - I need your help

This is a discussion on Marines - I need your help within the Law Enforcement, Military & Homeland Security Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; Was it ever down to 8 or 9 weeks at any time, years ago?? Say from 1970 to about 2000, did they ever get it ...

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  1. #16
    Senior Member Array dcb188's Avatar
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    Was it ever down to 8 or 9 weeks at any time, years ago?? Say from 1970 to about 2000, did they ever get it down to 8 or 9?
    Surrounded and outnumbered, Marine Col Lewis Puller: "Good! We finally got 'em where we want 'em!" (Korea, 1950)
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  2. #17
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    Before Gen. Krulak started the "crucible", it was entirely possible that it got down to that short.

    Boot camp is technically 1 week of "recieving" and 12 weeks of training.
    Fortes Fortuna Juvat

    Former, USMC 0311, OIF/OEF vet
    NRA Pistol/Rifle/Shotgun/Reloading Instructor, RSO, Ohio CHL Instructor

  3. #18
    Senior Member Array cagueits's Avatar
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    I remeber a few good posts on this thread.

    By the way, whats his age?

  4. #19
    Senior Member Array dcb188's Avatar
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    Hi Cagueits: I spent two years at Sabana Seca in the Marine Corps. Two out of the four.
    Surrounded and outnumbered, Marine Col Lewis Puller: "Good! We finally got 'em where we want 'em!" (Korea, 1950)
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    Right is Wrong and Wrong is Right.
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    Socrates : "Knowledge is knowing that we know nothing".

  5. #20
    VIP Member Array semperfi.45's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2AMomma View Post
    My main questions are in regards to bootcamp - specifically what your experiences were, and how to overcome some of the difficulties. And how can he get involved in officers candidate school?
    Do yourself and your son a favor and find a mentor in a Marine who may have just gotten out or is still in(your local Marine Corps League will help you out). He will know the fleet and the modern system and will be able to answer questions better than some of us older salts. He should go with your son to the recruiter to keep him on the up and up.

    A Taste of Bootcamp
    Training means learning the rules. Experience means learning the exceptions.

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2AMomma View Post
    So if he begins college, and goes to ocs during the summer, will the corps pay for anything (travel to and from etc.) ?
    Yes

  7. #22
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    2AMomma,

    When I joined (1969) I went in with the belief that I would be the best trained and would serve with the best trained. That was my motivation and helped with the "difficulties". The truth is that it wasn't that bad. But, I sure wouldn't want to try it if I wasn't in shape. I think most of us on this thread would tell you we felt a degree of pride at graduation. After all, our buddies in the Army had weekend leave!!!

    Becoming an officer.... With your son's grades I recommend he go to college first. I'm out of the loop but have to assume there are PCS type programs available now.

    Semperfi.45 had an interesting suggestion. Many cities have a Semper Fi society. You might find one in your city. If not, let us know. One of might live near you and knows a recent USMC departure.

  8. #23
    Senior Member Array cagueits's Avatar
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    What years dcb188? (Pre/post AIDS monkeys incident)

  9. #24
    Member Array 2AMomma's Avatar
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    You guys are so wonderful! No wonder this is the branch he has chosen!

    To answer a few questions:

    cagueits: he is 16 (going on 25) but he will graduate high school next year...

    dcb188: Currently - per the marine websites - bootcamp is 13 weeks, but during heavy deployments they drop it to 8 weeks...

    buckeyeLCPL: looks like for PLC it's 2 6week sessions and a 10week session during the summers between freshman, sophomore, and junior years respectively, then after senior year you head to TBS, by the way, what is The Basic School? Thanks for the pm invite, we may take you up on it!


    Is there much difference between going to college doing the PLC summer sessions, and going to college doing NROTC?
    It looks like NROTC has some extra perks as far as financial aid for college, but I don't know for sure...
    "A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed."


    "SA is a cognitive state or process associated with the assessment of multiple environmental cues in a dynamic situation" ~ Isaac

  10. #25
    Ex Member Array Ram Rod's Avatar
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    I joined the USMC the year I graduated (1982) and I was only 17 in June of that year--my parents had to sign for me. It's a decision and experience I'm glad I did. I'm a better person today for being a Marine. I did the minimum enlistment 4/2, but what I learned and know to this day will last me a lifetime and it helps me now in everyday life. The Marines have the longest, most stringent basic training of all the services and for good reason. Choose an MOS and some alternates. When it comes down to it, the ASVAB tests will likely indicate compatibility and placement within those choices or better alternatives depending. My best wishes for you and your son. Semper Fi.

  11. #26
    Senior Member Array CEW58's Avatar
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    I'm not a former Marine, but a retired Army NCO so I can't tell you or him anything about the Marines, but I can tell him this. "Pay attention to details" Good advice no matter what branch of the military one serves in. Oh, and tell him one more thing. Tell him "Thank You".
    The difference between stupidity and genius is that genius has its limits. ~ Albert Einstein

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  12. #27
    Member Array kpaul's Avatar
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    National Museum of the Marine Corps

    If you have the time/$ they have a good exhibit on boot camp--

    Once A Marine

    Pretty good site above--

    Also does his school have a ROTC program--

    Devil Pups - Official Website of Devil Pups Inc. Non-Profit Organization - Home

    Is a camp that is kind of like boot camp--

    Way to go for your kid-- Marine life is pretty good once boot camp/school is over-- The guy I went in with was a recruiter and did his 20 and now gets $$ for life plus medical and dental-- I got out and have a pretty good job in hospital security but still have ? years to go before I can retire-- Moral is if he likes it tell him to stick it out--

    Things have changed a lot since my time in (83-87)-- They have added this thing called the "crucible" and I guess it is three days of hell--My bud said ours was worse as we were in the field for a week but...
    The good thing "the crucible' is at the end of boot camp so you son should be ready for it--

    I would agree with others:
    Go and talk to the recruiter with you son-- Make sure he gets a MOS (job) and it is in his contract-- Make sure they don't change anything at MEPPS (physical when he is away from you- he will have to do this himself)-- My friend was supposed to be a MP also but it all changed at LA MEPPS when we went in for our physical-- They can not say were he will be stationed as far as I know- He may get a choice if he is tops in his class etc.--

    Make sure he can run at least 3 miles and it would be best if he got in shape running with some weight on his back--

    Remember the DIs job is to teach you son how to stay alive if he has to go to war so take it all with a grain of salt-

    Once a Marine always a Marine
    "Goodnight, Chesty, wherever you are."
    K.Paul
    Semper Fi

  13. #28
    Senior Member Array tegemu's Avatar
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    I am a retired USN Senior Chief and I wholeheartedly support his decision to go USMC. They are the best in their field. However if he would like to specialize in some career field not offerred by the Corps, I would suggest that he look seriously at the USN. THe USN has MANY more career firlds and very few involve crawling around in the mud. THe USN and the USMC are in the same branch of the Dept of Defense and are therefore brothers, regardless of the interservice bickering you see between them. They both have a very high regard for the other.
    People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence in their behalf. - George Orwell

  14. #29
    Member Array AgentX's Avatar
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    NROTC USMC officer candidates and MECEP (enlisted Marines associated with an NROTC unit going to college/OCS on merit) go to OCS on the "Bulldog" program, or at least did in the 90s when I went through.

    It's a single 6-week session, as these candidates are already somewhat indoctrinated in the basics (how to drill, make a rack, Marine terminology/history, etc) and so they get right to the physical/mental heart of the matter.

    PLCs and OCCs will spend more time getting acquainted with the culture and methods of the USMC, hence the longer session. (At least they did back then.)

    Boot camp and OCS differ quite a bit, although superficially they look similar. In short, a lot of people want to quit boot camp and they won't let them. A lot of people want to stay at OCS, but they won't let them, either. In boot camp, you're evaluated on your ability to perform tasks; in OCS, you're more evaluated on your ability to lead others through tasks. Of course, both sides have a similar basic skill set, including fitness, land navigation, etc. But at OCS you'll never shoot a live round, although you'll organize and lead others through simulated attacks (blank fire) and stressful scenarios. You'll go to the range and learn to shoot once you pass the course and are commissioned. The physical training in OCS to much higher standards--but it's physical training, concentrated into sessions, and not the endless amount of incentive/punitive PT you'll get all day in boot camp. In boot camp, some will get to leadership positions, but relatively few; you graduate if you pass all the standards. In OCS, the leadership positions are rotated and are your primary source of evaluation. You can pass all the standards at OCS but fail to graduate based on their judgement of you as a leader.

    So both programs offer a lot, depending on what your son's personal goals/desires are. Marines care a lot more about others for wearing the Eagle, Globe, and Anchor than for what rank is on their collars.

  15. #30
    VIP Member Array semperfi.45's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tegemu View Post
    THe USN and the USMC are in the same branch of the Dept of Defense and are therefore brothers, regardless of the interservice bickering you see between them. They both have a very high regard for the other.
    True, but the Marine Corps is the men's department.

    Sorry Senior Chief, just couldn't resist.
    Training means learning the rules. Experience means learning the exceptions.

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