How old is too old?

This is a discussion on How old is too old? within the Law Enforcement, Military & Homeland Security Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; A question for the leos - leos only please. I have a college degree in IT, but would like to give something more back to ...

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 23

Thread: How old is too old?

  1. #1
    VIP Member
    Array ctr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Shenandoah Valley in Virginia
    Posts
    2,291

    How old is too old?

    A question for the leos - leos only please.

    I have a college degree in IT, but would like to give something more back to the community, help folks out, and get the satisfaction of a job worth doing back, similiar to when I was in a volunteer rescue squad some years back.

    I've been thinking of switching careers into law enforcement for several years. Is mid - late 40's too old to make the transition?

  2. Remove Ads

  3. #2
    Distinguished Member Array Agave's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    West Tennessee
    Posts
    1,464
    It is generally going to be too old if you plan on retiring. My guess is that otherwise, it would depend on you.

    Edit: my reread reveals to me that you don't want my opinion and I respect that. I'm sorry for not catching that first. Please remember that "leo" is on the lines of "capricorn" and "aries." "LEO" is something different and perhaps would have caught my attention.
    Last edited by Agave; December 14th, 2008 at 11:28 PM.
    The preceding post may contain sarcasm; it's just better that way. However, it is still intended with construction and with the Love of my L-rd Y'shua.

    NRA Certified Pistol Instructor, Tennessee Certified Instructor

  4. #3
    VIP Member Array AZ Husker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Phoenix
    Posts
    4,244
    My Dad got his commission at age 52 (world's oldest rookie) after attending a community college academy that was accepted by his city. He just did it to see if he could. He chose to work as a reserve and made a fortune doing off-duty side work.
    Treat me good, I'll treat you better. Treat me bad, I'll treat you worse.

  5. #4
    Member Array rmarcustrucker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Twinsburg, Ohio
    Posts
    323
    auxiliary or reserve police in many communities is a good compromise. Most are volanteer organizations, but if you want to give back, it's a good way to do it. I'm an auxiliary with a local department. No way could I keep up with the rookies when I ride with them. Those 20 year olds are able to chase down the average BG (aged 15-25) much better then I can (age 41).
    Most departments have age requirements for regulars. I never wanted to be a LEO, but I've enjoyed decades doing what I do, part-time. Hope this helps.

  6. #5
    VIP Member
    Array ctr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Shenandoah Valley in Virginia
    Posts
    2,291
    No problem Agave - I respect your opinion and appreciate the time you took to respond. I am seeking input from folks in the know so to speak.

    Quote Originally Posted by Agave View Post
    It is generally going to be too old if you plan on retiring. My guess is that otherwise, it would depend on you.

    Edit: my reread reveals to me that you don't want my opinion and I respect that. I'm sorry for not catching that first. Please remember that "leo" is on the lines of "capricorn" and "aries." "LEO" is something different and perhaps would have caught my attention.

  7. #6
    VIP Member
    Array ctr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Shenandoah Valley in Virginia
    Posts
    2,291
    Quote Originally Posted by rmarcustrucker View Post
    auxiliary or reserve police in many communities is a good compromise. Most are volanteer organizations, but if you want to give back, it's a good way to do it. I'm an auxiliary with a local department. No way could I keep up with the rookies when I ride with them. Those 20 year olds are able to chase down the average BG (aged 15-25) much better then I can (age 41).
    Most departments have age requirements for regulars. I never wanted to be a LEO, but I've enjoyed decades doing what I do, part-time. Hope this helps.
    I know better than to try and keep up with a 20 year old - that is why cruisers have V8s. :)

    I will look into the reserves. I've been meaning to talk to my neighbor about it - he is a reserve officer for a local department.

  8. #7
    Senior Member Array Knuckledrager's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    693
    If you really want to make the switch, I would check with agencies that you are interested in working for and see what opportunities exist. In PA, the age restrictions vary by department. Our academies are of a POST variety. There are no age limits and the PT standards (for better or worse) are age adjusted. Good luck on you quest!
    "The liberty of the individual is no gift of civilization. It was greatest before there was any civilization." Sigmund Freud

  9. #8
    Senior Member Array mulle46's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    1,164
    Are you thinking more of a full-time LEO position or more as a reserve officer/deputy? My current dept. does accept people in that age range, but they have to be able to pass the academy with all its requirements. My academy class guide(leader) was deemed too old by the state pension board, as he was over 35 at his time of appointment,he had to appeal and fight the ruling. So, you might want to look at your state's requirements for age for LEO and their pension.
    You gain strength, courage, and confidence by every experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face. You are able to say to yourself, "I have lived through this horror. I can take the next thing that comes along." . . . You must do the thing you think you cannot do. Eleanor Roosevelt

  10. #9
    Member Array JAG45's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Central Arkansas I-40 heading west
    Posts
    206

    Oh Yes

    CTR, I took the class and became a reserve officer two years ago at the age of 56. One of the people in the class with me was 62. The two of us had the highest grades in the class. We have been on the reserve program for the last two years and doing great. I found out last weekend the even at this advance age and with 45 pounds of gear I can still out run most 14 and 15 year olds in a foot race for 150 yards if I do not have to spot them more than about 20 yards.

    Go for it and give it a try.... JAG

  11. #10
    Senior Member
    Array MP45Man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    State of Guns and Religion
    Posts
    937

    Question

    I've been toying around with the reserve thing. Is this something that all departments do or does it depend on each departments policies?

  12. #11
    Senior Member Array mi2az's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    651
    I wouldn't mind being a reserve type thing, it might be kind of fun and would open my eyes to what actually happens in this town
    "When the people fear the government you have tyranny...when the government fears the people you have liberty."

    --Thomas Jefferson --

  13. #12
    VIP Member
    Array 64zebra's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Panhandle of Texas
    Posts
    6,437
    wow, this sounds way too familiar.....

    I'm 36, degree and certifications in IT, worked in that field for 10 years,
    just graduated from academy and on the streets now

    if you want to do it and can find an agency that will have you...then do it

    if you have retirement $$$ that would be in jeopardy then you must consider that-are you vested, can you keep it where its at? can you roll in into an IRA or other fund? needs some thought....but so does being happy with your job, thats what pushed me t do it,...that and I feel I was called to do it
    LEO/CHL
    Certified Glock Armorer

    "I got a touch of hangover bureaucrat, don't push me"
    --G.W. McClintock

    Independence is declared; it must be maintained. Sam Houston-3/2/1836
    If loose gun laws are good for criminals why do criminals support gun control?

  14. #13
    VIP Member
    Array TX-JB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Sugar Land, TX
    Posts
    5,738
    Here in Texas, several Sheriff's dept's have no max. age requirement. There is usually a physical agility test along with a general high school level written exam. There is even the possibility of retirement.
    "Texas can make it without the United States, but the United States can't make it without Texas!".... Sam Houston

    Retired LEO
    Firearms Instructor
    NRA Life Member

  15. #14
    VIP Member
    Array ppkheat's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Louisiana
    Posts
    4,073
    I spent 25 years as a reserve and don't regret it a bit. It's also a good stepping-stone to full time leo duty. I passed on several opportunities because I had a family business to run and I couldn't be full time and do both at the same time.
    Turn the election's in 2014 to a "2A Revolution". It will serve as a 1994 refresher not to "infringe" on our Second Amendment. We know who they are now.........SEND 'EM HOME. Our success in this will be proportional to how hard we work to make it happen.

  16. #15
    Distinguished Member Array Rexster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    SE Texas
    Posts
    1,772
    Houston PD will gladly hire recruits, provided they will be no older than 45 (IIRC; might be 44) when graduating from the six-month academy. HPD pays its academy cadets a rather nice salary, and is aggressively hiring. A 3-year hiring freeze in the 1980's means that now, 20+ years later, there is an attrition problem. HPD officers are vested at ten years, for pension purposes, and an officer who starts at the max age can collect a pension.

    Other agencies in the Houston/Harris County area have no age limit, but you usually must already have attended an academy and have your state peace officer license.

    Some sheriff's agencies will hire jailers, with no age limit, and will send good jailers to an academy to receive peace officer training. Once having achieved full peace officer status, working the streets will become an option. Harris County, Texas, which is the greater Houston area, is like this, and I was told there are little to no physical standards for a starting jailer, though attending the academy to become a fully-sworn deputy will probably require meeting some standard.

    Back to Houston PD: A stumbling block for many prospective recruits is credit problems.

    Overall, nationwide, there is a shortage of police officer recruits, due to the aging of the population, and many agencies have raised or eliminated age limits. There have been stories from the major media outlets of age 50+ rookies. The job of LEO is not just a job, it is a calling, and is an adventure. I have met many HPD officers who left the private sector, and took a pay cut, to serve their community. Not so many highly-motivated people take the jailer route to Harris County deputy, because the jail, is frankly, hellish, no matter how clean and new and streamlined.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Search tags for this page

age limit for homeland security

,

homeland security age restrictions

,

how old is too old for homeland security

,

how old is too old for law enforcement

,

is 40 too old to get a job with homeland security

,
is 41 too old for homeland security jobs
,

is there an age limit to join homeland security

,

too old for law enforcement

,

too old to work at homeland security

,
what age is too old for homeland security
,

what is the age limit to join homeland security

,
what is the age limit to join the homeland
Click on a term to search for related topics.