My rookies lessons learned file

This is a discussion on My rookies lessons learned file within the Law Enforcement, Military & Homeland Security Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; There's a couple of LEO's that drop by where I work (small town) - one is training a rookie. Getting lost was a big hurdle ...

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Thread: My rookies lessons learned file

  1. #16
    VIP Member Array nedrgr21's Avatar
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    There's a couple of LEO's that drop by where I work (small town) - one is training a rookie. Getting lost was a big hurdle for him. One night they are addressing a deer population problem. The sergeant shoots one deer and is standing right next to it and wanting to shoot another. He tells the rookie to shine the light on the deer. Rookie lights up the dead deer (ok, that was kinda a communication thing, but still funny). Sergeant says, no, put the light on top of my head (trying to get him to shine the light in the direction he's looking). Rookie puts light on top of his head - lighting up Jupiter. The sergeant is a great storyteller and hearing the whole ordeal from him had us all in tears.

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  3. #17
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    The GPS thing... yes, we are GPS equipped, but it doesn't give directions or a map. It only gives our current location. The equipment does have the capability to do so, but for whatever reason its not turned on. Being honest though, unless the jurisdiction is huge, no cop wants to rely on a GPS. A good cop knows his beat.
    "Just blame Sixto"

  4. #18
    Senior Member Array usmc3169's Avatar
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    great post SIXTO, looking forward to reading more.
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."

  5. #19
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    He'll learn eventually I suppose. Didn't you say he just got out of the Marines? That would explain the stubborness part.

    From what I heard it was a rather hectic time to be in SW Ohio, I'm sure the cincy snow drivers were out in force.
    Fortes Fortuna Juvat

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  6. #20
    Senior Member Array Divebum47's Avatar
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    The GPS thing... yes, we are GPS equipped, but it doesn't give directions or a map. It only gives our current location. The equipment does have the capability to do so, but for whatever reason its not turned on. Being honest though, unless the jurisdiction is huge, no cop wants to rely on a GPS. A good cop knows his beat.
    Absolutely on knowing the beat. Depending upon the level of your equipment, there are GPS systems coupled with the CAD systems that can send out an address which will automatically dump into the computer and calculate which unit is closest to the address and route that vehicle, along with backup, to the address. Additionally, AVLS systems know where you are at all times. Now this might sound like "Big Brother", but it sure is nice when you need back up or if you need to call in a med-evac.

    I don't want to sound like a know-it-all, so please forgive me if I'm telling you stuff you already know. I spent quite a bit of time working with the Panasonic Toughbook and associated docking and mounting hardware and software. The docks and mounts which OSHP uses were built by the company for which I worked. I had a little influence on some of the design of the third and forth generations of the docking station.

    I apologize if I hijacked the thread.

    Be careful out there.
    "Never underestimate the power of stupid people in large groups"

  7. #21
    Distinguished Member Array Rexster's Avatar
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    I have noticed that ex-military rookies are not as map/navigation savvy these days as in the 1980's and 1990's. Perhaps the military uses GPS too much itself these days. I am not just meaning maps; I work in a big city, and my beat is mostly lower buildings, but there are usually enough big ones in sight at any time to serve as landmarks, and it is not unusual for a rookie to not be able to name a direction in which I point. One thing that drives some around the bend is that a major freeway that passes through my beat, US-59, is known as a north-south route, but in my area, it runs due east-west.

  8. #22
    Distinguished Member Array Rexster's Avatar
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    We have AVLS and GPS, but when I train or evaluate a rookie, he/she is expected to be able to find the location without switching the MDC to map mode, and in any case, map mode does not provide directions. It does display current location as a yellow dot, and one's most recent dispatched location as a red dot, which is handy when I leave my normal patrol area to back-up someone, without having to stop, put on the reading specs, and get out a map.

    We are not routinely dispatched using AVLS, at least on night shift, though dispatch has that capability. The dispatcher has to click on a tab to see us on AVLS, and most have enough on their plate keeping up with CAD on its tab. We are primarily responsible for our beats, regardless of where we may be located in the district. I can see using AVLS to see who is closest to a call during day and evening shifts, when traffic congestion makes a huge difference in response time. It is customary for us to advise the dispatcher if we are far from a high-priority call, so a closer unit can respond, but the original unit remains responsible for the call, unless another unit volunteers to take over.

  9. #23
    Senior Member Array usmc3169's Avatar
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    Re: prior military navigation -
    I would imagine (hope) that with the war in Iraq that you would start to see vets coming in that are a little more urban nav savvy. - on the other hand if they were pogues who just ran around on highways and never did ops in the cities then you never know...
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."

  10. #24
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    When I was in, we got a whole lot of land nav, but very little city training. Granted, the same basic principles apply, but it is a lot different.
    "Just blame Sixto"

  11. #25
    Senior Member Array usmc3169's Avatar
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    It is very different - even in the infantry nowadays the land nave training is lacking in my view, at least in the classroom. Maybe there is to much dependence on GPS.

    by the way this is my 100th post on Defensive Carry!
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."

  12. #26
    VIP Member Array Dal1Celt's Avatar
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    SIXTO, I only hope that when I retire from the military and if I make my way into Law Enforcement I get an FTO as good as you.

    My younger brother an LEO of 14 years is still trying to talk me out of it. But 23 years 6 months and 17 days of service to the gov't, it's hard to think of anything else... Yes, I'm institutionalized, I know...
    "Without fear there can be no Courage!"

  13. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dal1Celt View Post
    SIXTO, I only hope that when I retire from the military and if I make my way into Law Enforcement I get an FTO as good as you.

    My younger brother an LEO of 14 years is still trying to talk me out of it. But 23 years 6 months and 17 days of service to the gov't, it's hard to think of anything else... Yes, I'm institutionalized, I know...
    You know, the grass is always greener. There are always the veterens that will talk new guys out of the job, I could easily be one of them too. It certainly isnt all peaches and cream.

    BUT, there are plenty of upsides too. First, if your smart and play your cards right, the money is pretty good despite the popular misconceptions that LEO's dont make decent money.

    Second, of all of my non LEO friends, I'm the only one without serious concerns of losing my job.

    Third, I get something different everyday. No cubicles for me.

    Fourth, Benefits. Retirement is good, health insurance is top rate. I bought out my military time, and I can retire before my 50th birthday. I can buy that condo in Florida and drive a caddi while I'm stil young enough to enjoy it.
    "Just blame Sixto"

  14. #28
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    Man, you let your rookie continue repeating those basic mistakes? I would have thought he would be buried in a shallow, unmarked grave by now. Perhaps you might inquire what standards the academy is using...
    "Each worker carried his sword strapped to his side." Nehemiah 4:18

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  15. #29
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    Ya know Sixto, ya tell a good story.
    Glad you're here.
    Ritalin - So much easier than parenting.

  16. #30
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    Ahhh, this brings back a lot of memories. I can remember training RCMP auxiliaries with their Smith model 10's. Any time they made the mistake of giving me attitude I'd do things like give them the wrong size speedloader and put them on a timed fire course while turning sirens on and off and tossing safety cones over there heads towards the targets.
    CCW permit holder for Idaho, Utah, Pennsylvania, Maine and New Hampshire. I can carry in your country but not my own.

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