$1 million in salary being paid to officers restricted in their jobs.

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    Thumbs down $1 million in salary being paid to officers restricted in their jobs.

    What the....

    Lengthy Review Process Keeps Prince George's Police Who Fire Weapons Off Patrol - washingtonpost.com

    Split-Second Shots Sideline Pr. George's Police for Months

    By Aaron C. Davis
    Washington Post Staff Writer
    Monday, April 13, 2009

    In the Washington area, 37 officers from major police agencies are on leave or restricted to desk duty, sidelined while they are investigated for shooting at suspects.

    All but six are Prince George's County police officers.

    Unlike most area departments, which typically return officers to the street within days or weeks, officers in Prince George's usually remain on desk duty for months after firing a weapon. One has been on desk duty for more than a year.

    In the county, such shootings are investigated by police, reviewed by prosecutors and then reexamined by an internal police board before officers are allowed back to work. The process represents a cautious approach in a county with a history of allegations of excessive force by police. But it is at odds with an aim shared by most other departments in the region: to see that officers who have done nothing wrong return to work as quickly as possible.

    Over the past five years, the lengthy process has resulted in more than 100 county officers being taken off patrol for months at a time and more than $1 million in salary being paid to officers restricted in their jobs. Not one shooting by an on-duty county officer in that time has been deemed unjustified.

    Until a reporter described them last week, Police Chief Roberto L. Hylton said he was unaware that the differences between his department and others in the area were so stark.

    "It goes against all models of reasonableness," Hylton said of his department's approach. A 28-year veteran, Hylton became chief this year.

    Hylton said he would discuss the issue with State's Attorney Glenn F. Ivey, whose investigations into the shootings typically take months.

    The strain of the officers' absence has become palpable in recent weeks, particularly as budgetary constraints have forced two-week furloughs. The 31 officers under investigation cannot work their patrol shifts; police supervisors have resorted to assigning fewer officers to target the most pressing crime trends in the very neighborhoods where carjackings, bank robberies and hostage situations led to police shootings.

    Vince Canales, president of the Prince George's officers' union, said officers dislike desk duty -- many lose income because they cannot work overtime and are banned from working private security jobs while under investigation. In addition, Canales said, the policy has created a potential risk to public safety.

    "We have had officers who have been in serious situations -- and who should have fired their weapons -- later report that they did not because they worried about the fact that they would be off for so long," he said.

    Last month, 12 county officers were added to the list of those on leave or desk duty after they fatally shot an armed man outside a bar in Temple Hills. Largely because officers fired so many rounds -- about 90 -- clearing up who shot when and whether every shot was justified will mean the 12 will remain away from patrol for months, police and prosecutors said.

    "There has to be a balance between what's good for the community, the agency and the police officer, and it would be hard to say that this is it," said Doug Ward, director of the Johns Hopkins University Division of Public Safety Leadership, which teaches best practices to law enforcement agencies.

    Ward said that, although there's no national standard for when to return officers to work after shootings, "I don't know of any other jurisdiction where it's this strict."

    The District, Baltimore and Prince George's have each recorded dozens of officer-involved shootings in the past year, but Baltimore and the District have no officers on leave or desk duty because of the ongoing investigations, officials said.

    In the District, police supervisors make a preliminary decision after three days about whether a shooting by an officer was, in police parlance, "good." If it was, the officer returns to full-duty status while a criminal review churns along in the background.

    In Baltimore and Montgomery County, officers are sidelined as they are in Prince George's while prosecutors review shootings. But the process moves more quickly in those jurisdictions, and neither requires officers to remain off patrol during a subsequent internal review. One Montgomery officer, whose review was delayed because he was injured, has been out since Feb. 29.

    Most Washington area law enforcement agencies don't wait for state prosecutors to completely finish reviewing shootings. Such is the case in Prince William County, where two officers have been sidelined since a shooting a week ago but are expected to return to full duty this week.

    The remaining three Washington area officers on leave or desk duty -- two from the Maryland National Park Police and one from the Prince George's sheriff's office -- also fired weapons in the Temple Hills incident last month. County police are investigating, and those agencies will wait for clearance from Ivey before returning the officers to duty.

    "There's a number [of shootings] we still have to take through an extended process to make sure every 't' is crossed and 'i' is dotted," Ivey said.

    Two years ago, to speed his part of the process, Ivey dropped a requirement that every police shooting be reviewed by a grand jury. Jurors had told him that the reviews were unnecessary, especially when officers did not hit anyone, he said.

    Still, Ivey said he presents evidence to grand juries from most shootings in which officers wound or kill someone.

    In recent years, police officials instituted the subsequent internal review to win approval from a federal monitor examining the department's use-of-force policies. The department decided on its own not to return officers to full duty until those reviews are completed.

    In rare cases, the chief chooses not to return an officer to full duty until the shooting undergoes a third level of review, this time by a citizen oversight panel.

    The multilayered process means officers from Prince George's can remain away from their duties long after their counterparts elsewhere, even if they were involved in the same incident.

    After officers from Howard and Prince George's counties fired at suspected bank robbers in November, for example, the Howard officers were cleared by their internal affairs division and returned to full-duty status the next month. Two Prince George's officers remain on administrative duty.

    The department did get good news this month about one of the 31 officers. An officer who shot a suspect in the leg while working as a security guard 13 months ago in Oxon Hill was cleared by a grand jury, officials said.

    The department's internal review of the shooting is underway.




    Sidelined Police Go Back to Work in Prince George's - washingtonpost.com

    Sidelined Police Go Back To Work
    Pr. George's Chief Cites Staffing Needs

    By Aaron C. Davis
    Washington Post Staff Writer
    Sunday, May 3, 2009

    The Prince George's County Police Department in recent days returned to full duty nearly half of the 31 county officers who had been sidelined while they were investigated for shooting at suspects, dramatically reducing a backlog that strained resources.

    The 14 officers -- most of whom had been on leave or desk duty for six months or more -- were reinstated by Chief Roberto L. Hylton, who cleared them even though internal reviews of the shootings are incomplete.

    "Chief Hylton decided that in the interest of maintaining proper staffing levels, this was one area where officers were being kept away from their duties unnecessarily," said Maj. Andy Ellis, a department spokesman. "He has not scrapped the [internal] process, but he is reevaluating the way it will work going forward."

    The Washington Post reported last month that the department's unusually lengthy review process is at odds with an aim shared by most other departments in the region: to see that officers who have done nothing wrong return to work as quickly as possible.

    The process in Prince George's has resulted in more than 100 county officers being taken off patrol for months at a time during the past five years, being paid more than $1 million in salary while they were prohibited from those duties. Not one shooting by an on-duty county officer in that time has been deemed unjustified.

    Last month, Hylton said that, until a reporter described them, he was unaware that the differences between his department's practices and those of other area departments were so stark, and he vowed to streamline the reviews.

    At the time, 38 officers from major police agencies in the area were sidelined because of such investigations. All but seven were county police in Prince George's.

    Unlike police agencies in the District, Virginia and neighboring counties in Maryland, which usually return officers to full duty within days or weeks, the practice in Prince George's has been to keep officers from full duty until reviews by both the county prosecutor and the police department are complete.

    State's Attorney Glenn F. Ivey presents evidence from most police shootings to a grand jury -- a process that can take weeks or months. Once that process is complete, a panel of police officials must review the shooting again before the officer involved is allowed to return to full duty. The 14 officers cleared late last month were in the latter part of that process.

    After the report in The Post, Hylton reviewed the shootings that Ivey had cleared and reinstated the 14 officers before their cases were reviewed by the panel, Ellis said.

    Among the 14 were six officers who on Thursday received medals of valor in the shootings.

    Two of the recipients, Sgt. Jeffrey Schreiber and Officer James Beasock Jr., were involved in the fatal shooting in November of a bank robber who had shot a bank teller in Howard County and then led police on a running gun battle through three counties.

    Howard officers who fired in the same incident were cleared and returned to duty the month after the incident. Schreiber and Beasock had been cleared months ago by prosecutors, but remained on desk duty, awaiting clearance from the police department.

    "It's good to be back," Schreiber said Thursday after the county's annual awards ceremony.

    Another officer Hylton returned to duty last week was Cpl. Tanya Brooks, who on Oct. 15 fired through her windshield at a man who later tested positive for PCP. The suspect, who was driving a truck, had repeatedly rammed Brooks's police cruiser.

    On Thursday, the department also reinstated Officer Cornelius Johnson. Johnson had been restricted to desk duty for almost 14 months after shooting a suspect in the leg early last year while working as a security guard in Oxon Hill.

    "It's about time," said Vince Canales, president of the Prince George's Fraternal Order of Police. "The lengths of the delays were unwarranted when you look at the situations these officers were in; some were being fired upon, others were protecting citizens or themselves. Returning them to full-duty status sets the right tone. If officers are doing what they're supposed to do, they shouldn't be off that long."

    Prince George's police awarded medals of valor to 15 police officers involved in shooting incidents, including three in which suspects were fatally shot.

    For several years, department policy had been to not award medals of valor in incidents involving shootings.

    Twelve of the 17 remaining county officers on leave or desk duty after shootings could also be returned to the streets sooner than expected, officials said late last week. All fired their weapons during a March incident in Temple Hills in which a suspect allegedly held a woman at gunpoint and fired at police.

    Ivey said last week that he will probably not take the case to a grand jury. Video footage and witness statements support the officers' accounts, he said.
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    VIP Member Array Tom G's Avatar
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    The question is will these officers who were put on leave hesitate to shoot the next time they are put into a life or death situation??

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom G View Post
    The question is will these officers who were put on leave hesitate to shoot the next time they are put into a life or death situation??
    Hum?

    Maybe that's the point.

    This is PG MD.

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    I'm just one root in a grassroots organization. No one should assume that I speak for the VCDL.

    I am neither an attorney-at-law nor I do play one on television or on the internet. No one should assumes my opinion is legal advice.

    Veni, Vidi, Velcro

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    Makes my wonder why anyone would want to be a cop there? They (LEO's) are treated worse that the dirtbags they put away.
    Our society is going right down the tubes...
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    Distinguished Member Array nutz4utwo's Avatar
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    Here in Spokane, it takes between 1 week to 2 years to put an officer back on duty. There was a clean shoot where a k-9 officer killed a BG after he shot a police dog. Took 1 week for him to return to duty.

    Case where off duty, drunk officer shot unarmed man in the head went to trail against the officer: he was suspended from duty (no pay) went to trial, acquitted, the county paid his attorney fees, he was reinstated, received 2 years of back pay from the suspension, and was about to be fired for violating dept policy when he resigned...

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    VIP Member Array Janq's Avatar
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    One has to understand the complete context of the regional specific conditions though.

    The Prince Georges County MD police department are _notorious_ for their assaults against citizens as well as their quickness to discharge arms under any given circumstance, and to do so in volume.

    Ask any native person of MD or DC this and they will I guarantee you confirm as much.
    This is nothing new to the '00s either. It's been the case going back as far as the 70s dating to when the county under went 'white flight' as the lower region of MD underwent a major and massive change in it's socio-political standing. The PG county police and the MD sherriff department in response responded with avarice. The result of which has been well reported as to what citizens have endured through the ages, and to that the result as reported is to me not surprising at all considering the conditions and the history as within full historical context for this again specific department.

    This is the same department that is and has been constantly featured in the regions local news under LEO impropriety and abuse of force cases.
    Be clear, I am not anti police nor am I anti PG police. I am though not ignorant of the history of that specific police force and the politics as well as history of the region in general and as such I would not, as others less so familiar might, read this singular article and by that make some assumption that the result is simply and singularly a means to waste tax payer monies.

    Recent examples as featured here at DC.com alone toward the PG County po-po...

    http://www.defensivecarry.com/vbulle...-policies.html

    http://www.defensivecarry.com/vbulle...labradors.html

    Never mind history per Google; pg police abuse - Google Search

    - Janq
    "Killers who are not deterred by laws against murder are not going to be deterred by laws against guns. " - Robert A. Levy

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    Quote Originally Posted by Janq View Post
    One has to understand the complete context of the regional specific conditions though.
    ....

    The Prince Georges County MD police department are _notorious_ for their assaults against citizens as well as their quickness to discharge arms under any given circumstance, and to do so in volume.

    ....

    as the lower region of MD underwent a major and massive change in it's socio-political standing. The PG county police and the MD sherriff department in response responded with avarice. The result of which has been well reported as to what citizens have endured through the ages, and to that the result as reported is to me not surprising at all considering the conditions and the history as within full historical context for this again specific department.

    - Janq
    Janq

    I'm well aware of the disgrace/history of massive resistance in MD and of white flight and of PG county reputation. FWIIW, I am the OP of one of those DC threads you cite. FWIIW, I maintained a permanent residence for my family not to far across the PG line, in the Ft Meade area, from mid '70s until I retired (albeit I was TDY most of the time).

    It isn't the:
    At the time, 38 officers from major police agencies in the area were sidelined because of such investigations. All but seven were county police in Prince George's.
    Rather it's the:
    Unlike most area departments, which typically return officers to the street within days or weeks, officers in Prince George's usually remain on desk duty for months after firing a weapon. One has been on desk duty for more than a year. [emphasis added]
    and

    Until a reporter described them last week, Police Chief Roberto L. Hylton said he was unaware that the differences between his department and others in the area were so stark.[emphasis added]
    and

    Schreiber and Beasock had been cleared months ago by prosecutors, but remained on desk duty, awaiting clearance from the police department.. [emphasis added]
    and

    Ivey only dropped a requirement that every police shooting be reviewed by a Grand jury after
    Jurors had told him that the reviews were unnecessary. [emphasis added]
    and

    Among the 14 were six officers who on Thursday received medals of valor in the shootings.
    My problem is with the pure administrative foot dragging -- and its effect on the rank & file LEOs, and the cost to the tax payers.

    If someone did something wrong -- take appropriate administrative or criminal action and do it timely. If they deserve it, do it.

    OTOH, if some one deserve a medals of valor, do it.

    Both are not applicable at the same time/ in the same case.

    OMHO, this mess sounds like a bunch of front office brass w/o the brass accouterments need to do their job handicapping LEOs ability to do their job.

    As always YMMV, but IMHO this is a current disgrace, which former disgraces do not justify.
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    Veni, Vidi, Velcro

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    VIP Member Array Janq's Avatar
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    Dave,

    I was not speaking to you directly...I was posting in general which is why I didn't quote a specific thread nor address my post to a specific person.

    For folks who are not of the region and thus wholly unfamiliar this can seem to be more and/or less than it actually may be/is.
    The delays may not wholly be purely administrative. Internal politics as well as external politics may be at play additionally, above and beyond receiving external (grand jury) clearance and/or internal investigative clearance.

    Further the statement by the Chief toward his not knowing the disparity is disingenuous, at best.

    He's the Chief of Police (!). As department lead and head agency politician he _should_ know what the norms are for policies and procedures amongst his contemporaries within his own immediate region, and related to those of his own agency. This should be an awareness and working knowledge that any CoP should have regardless of agency and region. I would and we all should expect same from CoPs as well as from the fire chief, a hospital administrator, as well as the chief of DPW, the school superintendent and the mayor or ones town manager too.

    More over is the CoP not aware of his own agencies budget? Most every agency across the nation is suffering through low budgetary conditions. Having any muchless as many officers off the street riding a desk or not working at all is not just a waste of tax payer resources but doubly results in a real reduction in tax payers receiving real services as well as expected levels of support for their dollar. Tax payers lose out three ways rather than one, for their dollar.
    And again the CoP who as stated in the article is a 28 yr. veteran prior to becoming department lead last year (which means he was at one time a second in charge 'Captain') and yet we the people are supposed to believe he had no clue as to how other agency operations handled employee management practices or employee event investigation timeliness?
    That alone is a bit much to swallow as believable.

    Either the CoP not just as in the position of Chief but as in his prior position with the department was not and is not providing tax payers with the full level and degree of profession related servicing as is nominal for such a position current as Chief and/or past as Captain.
    Or he is in the immediate as related to this event present and past not being sincere with the Washington Post nor with his agency _and_ the taxpayer who fund him, his department, and the ongoing salaries of these effectively sidelined officers who otherwise could have and should have been back on full and normal duty covering cases and working patrol as is normal and expected for such an agency.

    For the Chief of Police of a major city police force to not know and be unaware of his own agencies internal human resources issues and tax payer wastage, as well as have no idea of the average processing time frame as related to human resources management amongst his contemporaries is one thing as quoted in his own words to which I completely agree with the Chief;

    "It goes against all models of reasonableness" - Police Chief Roberto L. Hylton

    - Janq
    "Killers who are not deterred by laws against murder are not going to be deterred by laws against guns. " - Robert A. Levy

    "A license to carry a concealed weapon does not make you a free-lance policeman." - Florida Div. of Licensing

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