Thinking of joining the Air Force

This is a discussion on Thinking of joining the Air Force within the Law Enforcement, Military & Homeland Security Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; I was thinking about doing Intel w/ Linguistics. I imagine that is something always in demand and would be one of the areas my degree ...

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 46

Thread: Thinking of joining the Air Force

  1. #16
    Member Array Blakestr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Orlando, FL
    Posts
    92
    I was thinking about doing Intel w/ Linguistics. I imagine that is something always in demand and would be one of the areas my degree would help, not hinder. I do have a knack for languages but I am not sure how much it would help in the civilian sector to be an intelligence analyst. Obviously being completely fluent in a language like Chinese or Arabic would grant opportunities such as translator, consultant.

    It hasn't been nor is it my lifelong dream to become a pilot so if I don't make that gig I won't be too upset. Although if they offer me a Stealth Bomber or UAV I would have to go for it just because. That's probably unlikely, being that I am 20/40 uncorrected--I know they are more lenient nowadays but still. My understanding of it now is that only 5% of pilots come from OTS, most are from the academies.

  2. Remove Ads

  3. #17
    Member Array Arisin Wind's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    450
    Go see enlisted and officer recruiters to get the straight scoop.
    Be not far from me, for trouble is near; For there is none to help. psalm22:11

  4. #18
    VIP Member Array SIGguy229's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Kommie-fornia-stan
    Posts
    7,046
    Quote Originally Posted by Blakestr View Post
    I was thinking about doing Intel w/ Linguistics. I imagine that is something always in demand and would be one of the areas my degree would help, not hinder. I do have a knack for languages but I am not sure how much it would help in the civilian sector to be an intelligence analyst. Obviously being completely fluent in a language like Chinese or Arabic would grant opportunities such as translator, consultant.
    Believe me when I say intel is always in demand...even in the private sector. The intelligence community is about 1/3 contractor...and a security clearance will earn you more $$ the higher the clearance is.
    Magazine <> clip - know the difference

    martyr is a fancy name for crappy fighter
    You have never lived until you have almost died. For those that have fought for it, life has a special flavor the protected will never know

  5. #19
    Member Array Blakestr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Orlando, FL
    Posts
    92
    Guess I need to teach myself Chinese or Arabic...personally I think China is a bigger long-term threat than Arabic, although certainly Arabic would be definitely useful for the next 10-20 years

  6. #20
    Member Array gogriz91's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Middle GA
    Posts
    171
    Almost all linguists in the AF are enlisted. Officers supervise these folks, there are a few programs where if you speak a foreign language the AF will send you for immersion training to that country for a couple of months but you have to have a knowledge of the language and test well in order to qualify. OSI folks do IT counter-espionage and exploitation and some investigation/collection in foreign countries but alot of that work is liasing with other nations intelligence agencies for info sharing etc. They will send you to language school either in Monterrey or in the nation you're headed to then park you in that country for a couple of years to learn as much as you can about the local culture then you're off to another country.

    As for UPT the AF is only lenient with waivers when they need pilots. I would apply if my AFOQT was high but the AF doesn't necessarily need pilots. They're going to have to find cockpits for about 600 fighter pilots over the next 10 years as they start sticking F-15s in the boneyard, the competition will be terrific for a slot at UPT unless a major theater war kicks off and we start grinding through the stockpile. You won't go straight to UAVs right out of UPT and you won't go straight to the B-2 community either, those guys come out of B-52 or B-1s with 3-5 years experience in bombers, UAV drivers have a couple of years flying recce or as IPs at a training base. OTS gets more than 5% of the slots but slots are hard to come by these days so competition is fierce as folks who have been in the program longer compete more favorably. If you can score a 95% or better on the pilot portion of the AFOQT I would apply and try to get a waiver but don't get your hopes up. If you like computers and networking become a Comm Officer, 33S. If you want some IT, some language and to be overseas or in DC then go OSI. Don't go into Admin, CE, SF, Services or one of those obscure support functions. I wouldn't go Nav either because the AF is phasing out airframes with Navs in them, go with something you can get a clearance or some training to work for a contractor or start your own business.
    Desperate people do desperate things in desperate situations.

    Heavily medicated for your protection.

    Kimber Tactical Custom II, SIS Pro

  7. #21
    Senior Member Array Herknav's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Waypoint 0
    Posts
    986
    Shotdown: I think you meant "Air Battle Manager." These are guys that sit in the back of an AWACS or at a ground based CRC.

    To the OP:
    If you want to fly, try to go. You won't know until you try.

    Here's where I'll disagree with gogriz91--Right now, the AF is hurting so bad for pilots that they are offering to let guys who got out come back in. Does this help you? I don't know. I haven't heard anything about them ramping up pilot production, but it can't hurt you.

    You might also look into the Guard and Reserve. It's not for everybody, but it's worth a look. Whatever you decide, you can never talk to too many people or get too many opinions.
    I would rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on Earth.--Steve McQueen

  8. #22
    Member Array Blakestr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Orlando, FL
    Posts
    92
    I'll study as much as I can but considering I have no natural ability at piloting and know little about it other than what the study guides offer, I'll try to stay realistic, though I am a decent test taker.

    My concern now is, will decent scores on the AFOQT, a degree in English Literature be enough to get me into BOT? Also, what will having experience as a Career Firefighter, with Hydralic Pump Operator (fire truck pump) and hazmat tech, as well as licensed paramedic? I know the recruiter will tell me these things but the more educated I am before I go talk to them, perhaps the more useful he can be as a recruiter.

  9. #23
    Distinguished Member Array tinkerinWstuff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Colorado Front Range
    Posts
    1,263
    I went to Pearl Harbor over Memorial Weekend and really miss my days in the service. I was Airforce in the late 90's. I tested high in mechanical ability and chose helicopter crewchief as 1st choice (longshot as not many heli's in the AF), heavies or cargo as my 2nd choice (because of the civilian application later), and then fighters as my 3rd. I don't remember my 4th or 5th job choice but I ended up get F-15 crew chief.

    I whole heartedly agree that as far as the different branches of service go, we had it great! But it's still the service and we were in Saudi Arabia 120deg heat with 100% humidity right on the coast. I also lived in Kohbar Towers and in the same building that was blown up in an attack but I left there 10 months before it happened.

    If I had it to do over again, I'd enlist in a heartbeat.
    "Run for your life from the man who tells you that money is evil. That sentence is the leper's bell of an approaching looter. So long as men live together on earth and need means to deal with one another-their only substitute, if they abandon money, is the muzzle of a gun."

    Who is John Galt?

  10. #24
    Senior Member Array Herknav's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Waypoint 0
    Posts
    986
    I would think you have qualifications to get into BOT. All the AF is looking for is a degree. My understanding is that the AFOQT is for job placement. I can't say what role your prior experience would play. Sometimes, they make some really wacky decisions. My money is that he will try to get you to go enlisted.

    Always remember that the recruiter is a salesman. He's trying to make a quota, just like a car salesman. He may or may not know what he's talking about. Some of them play fast and loose with the truth. As was previously stated, GET IT IN WRITING. Otherwise, it was just two guys talking.

    If you have any career field specific questions, let us know. Between all of us, we may be able to hook you up with somebody who currently does that job.
    I would rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on Earth.--Steve McQueen

  11. #25
    Senior Member Array Roadrunner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    NW PA
    Posts
    737
    If intelligence and language training are things you're really interested in, you can enlist as a linguist and the Air Force will teach you a language (provided you score high enough on the aptitude test). The bonuses for linguist positions are usually excellent. They also have programs to pay off some of your college debt. I was an analyst for four years in the Army, so I worked closely with the linguists and learned a lot about what their training and benefits were like. Knowing what I know now I wish I had signed up as a linguist instead. All services go to the same place for their analyst and language training, plus we all worked together in strategic environments, so even though I was Army most of the basic info still applies to the Air Force.

    If it's work that you enjoy, intel can be very lucrative whether you stay in the military or get out and go work as a contractor. I didn't like the actual work very much and I wanted to go to college, so I didn't take a civilian job when I got out. Many of my friends did and they started making good money right away, especially those that had a language. Several of them got civilian jobs in the same room they worked in before as soldiers, except as civilians they made 3-4 times as much money. The big thing is that once you get a security clearance, you're like gold to civilian employers because clearances take a long time to process and are very expensive. Many people who want to go into the intelligence community as a civilian enlist for a few years just to get the clearance. Hope this helps with your decision, feel free to ask if you'd like more information.
    - Kurt
    “Freedom is the sure possession of those alone who have the courage to defend it.” ~Pericles of Athens
    Primary Carry - Colt Commander .45 in a Brommeland Max-Con V

  12. #26
    Member Array gogriz91's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Middle GA
    Posts
    171
    If you've got a good GPA from your Bachelors and your AFOQT is competitive then depending on how bad the AF needs officers determines how hard it is to get into OTS. OTS is a valve they can open or close more readily than the other two commissioning sources when they do or don't need officers. All of the things you mentioned are jobs done by enlisted folks in the AF. That's not to say your experience won't help but it won't be a direct correlation to what yo would be doing in the AF. Your HAZMAT experience might help you get a Bio-environmental engineering job and your experience with mechanical things may help you test better on the mechanical portion of the AFOQT. The basic intent for officers in all services is that they lead and supervise and manage organizations or projects. If you're doing the grunt labor as an O you're either on staff and you're the lowest ranking guy in the room or you're doing your enlisted folks job for them.

    Recruiters can't lie per se but they can not tell the complete and whole truth about something. I would go talk to an Officer recruiter with a copy of your transcript and ask them what the realm of the possible is.
    Desperate people do desperate things in desperate situations.

    Heavily medicated for your protection.

    Kimber Tactical Custom II, SIS Pro

  13. #27
    Member Array Blakestr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Orlando, FL
    Posts
    92
    What exactly does intelligence work entail? Other than the concept if codebreaking and the stuff you see in the movies, I know little about the day-to-day functions of an intelligence officer.

    I am decent at languages and woul like to think I would score high on an aptitude test. My G.P.A from college was a 3.3, maybe a 3.5.

    I'm not sure about enlisting as a linguist. I guess it is hard to know my degree could start me off as an officer and I wouldn't want to 'waste' that. Time to do more research.

    You guys are all giving me great advice on something I know very little about. So thanks.

  14. #28
    VIP Member Array SIGguy229's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Kommie-fornia-stan
    Posts
    7,046
    In short, it's putting together a picture based on the information gathered from the intelligence community and open sources to satisfy commander's priority intelligence requirements (information he/she needs to make decisions) and provide operators the required information to find, fix, target, track, and engage the enemy.

    That's the cliff notes version.
    Magazine <> clip - know the difference

    martyr is a fancy name for crappy fighter
    You have never lived until you have almost died. For those that have fought for it, life has a special flavor the protected will never know

  15. #29
    Senior Member Array Roadrunner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    NW PA
    Posts
    737
    The stuff you see in the movies is highly dramatized (naturally, otherwise it would make a pretty crappy movie). Basically, in a strategic environment (a big base in the US or Germany) you'll go into a big windowless building and sit at a cubicle in front of a computer sifting through data trying to figure out what the enemy is up to. For obvious reasons I can't go into the details of how that is accomplished. In a tactical environment you'll do the same thing in a heavily guarded tent. The training is long and dealing with classified material is a PITA. You can't talk to anybody about what you did all day because, well, it's classified. You'll pull 12 or 8 hour shifts at all hours, and if your leaders are complete morons you'll be bounced from shift to shift "to make things fair for everyone" so the result is that nobody has a regular sleep schedule and they all feel hung over all of the time. As you can imagine, that doesn't make for a very fun work environment.

    Truthfully it's pretty damn boring, which is why I didn't want to do it anymore after four years. As gogriz91 said, as an officer you're a supervisor. You'll brief reports that someone else prepared to a higher ranking officer or you'll direct everyone in your section on what tasks they need to accomplish. Intelligence officers have it rough because their troops were selected for their brains. They have inquisitive minds that always want to know "why" and that's what makes them good analysts. It also makes them awful at taking orders without questioning them. This can create a lot of friction in an already high stress environment.

    If you're really interested in learning a language, I don't know if that's as option for officers because they aren't the ones who listen in on the headphones. I'm sure there are officers who get to go to the Defense Language Institute (DLI), but since I didn't move in their circles I have no idea how one would go about it. Keep in mind that if you enlist you can go to OCS (or whatever the Air Force calls their officer ascension program) after you've been in a few years. I think these people make better officers than many of their counterparts because they remember what it was like to be the one taking orders instead of giving them. Just food for thought.
    - Kurt
    “Freedom is the sure possession of those alone who have the courage to defend it.” ~Pericles of Athens
    Primary Carry - Colt Commander .45 in a Brommeland Max-Con V

  16. #30
    Member Array gogriz91's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Middle GA
    Posts
    171
    Os in the Intel community are Powerpoint rangers, as a junior officer you're either updating or building briefs to give to different audiences. You'll scour SIPRNET, cut and paste then urp it up to whoever you're briefing. You'll figure out who your audience is and whether or not a PPT depth of knowledge is sufficient or if you'll have to know more that just what's on the slides. Alot of the hardcore analysis is done by contractors and enlisted folks, your job is to collect and try to piece a puzzle together. Intel is just information until it's married up with other information to piece together a "picture" of what's happening or what's about to happen, it's alot of speculation.

    If you want to learn another language, go OSI, there are very few linguist trained Os in the Intel community.

    Have you taken the AFOQT yet? Do you remember what your ASVAB scores were like? There are one or two study books you can get at your local library to help you test better. Talk to an O recruiter, there's usually one for each district or region, however they're broken up. He/she should offer to take you to dinner to butter you up if they think you could be competitive. They should be able to tell you up front whether or not they think you have a shot at OTS based on your GPA and they'll ask if you have any misdemeanors, etc. Your GPA with your AFOQT along with a clean police record will tell the recruiter what they need to know about whether or not you'll be competitive for an OTS slot.

    OTS is 90 or so days of pushups, running, yelling, marching and bastardized games the rules of which are supposed to teach "leadership", what kind of physical shape are you in? It's more academics intensive than physical but you're running every day.
    Desperate people do desperate things in desperate situations.

    Heavily medicated for your protection.

    Kimber Tactical Custom II, SIS Pro

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Thinking of Joining the military
    By cudexter in forum Law Enforcement, Military & Homeland Security Discussion
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: November 7th, 2010, 10:25 PM
  2. Joining The Force From Washington
    By xThoR in forum New Members Introduce Yourself
    Replies: 35
    Last Post: December 25th, 2009, 11:20 PM
  3. Thinking about joining...
    By Barbary in forum General Firearm Discussion
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: March 20th, 2009, 06:20 PM
  4. Thinking of joining the police force...
    By Red82 in forum Law Enforcement, Military & Homeland Security Discussion
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: December 4th, 2008, 10:31 PM
  5. Thinking About Joining CombatCarry ???
    By QKShooter in forum Off Topic & Humor Discussion
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: March 18th, 2005, 12:00 AM

Search tags for this page

afoqt intelligence officer

,

afoqt intelligence score

,
afoqt requirements for intelligence officer 14n
,

afoqt score for intelligence

,

afoqt scores for intelligence

,

afoqt scores for intelligence officer

,

afoqt scores intelligence officer

,

air force english degree

,

airforce english degree

,
average afoqt scores for a intelligence officer slot
,

english degree in the air force

,
which os best study guide for afoqt
Click on a term to search for related topics.