To all Correctional Officers

To all Correctional Officers

This is a discussion on To all Correctional Officers within the Law Enforcement, Military & Homeland Security Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; Just curious how many Correctional Officers we have on DC I'm going to be taking my course this spring and I'm well to put it ...

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Thread: To all Correctional Officers

  1. #1
    Member Array Thegear234's Avatar
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    To all Correctional Officers

    Just curious how many Correctional Officers we have on DC I'm going to be taking my course this spring and I'm well to put it bluntly Excited!
    Live in yellow or die in white.


  2. #2
    Member Array irish_ironsight's Avatar
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    After 10 years of service in the Irish prison Service prior to moving to the USA.. The word of the day is "NO"
    Surrounded and outnumbered, pass me my vest!

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    Member Array LethalStang's Avatar
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    Former, for a reason. Good luck.
    Quote Originally Posted by rottkeeper View Post
    If you are living your life worried about being a victim all the time and not enjoying life to the fullest, you are already a victim...
    -You don't know what you don't see-

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    Member Array black knife's Avatar
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    Unless you like loud noises and having grown men complain all the time then go ahead. Also it gets boring working the gun tower or in a housing unit all the time.....I hated it.........I thought I was going to see alot of action but that was far from the truth......its boring most of the time.

    Also don't think you are going to get alot of respect from Cops...you won't...to them you are just a prison guard.

    The only thing I got out of it is I learned alot about street and prison gangs which helped me out on the streets. Also I got to carry off duty without a CCW.

    I suggest you go take the exam for Police Officer or Deputy Sheriff.....deputies work in the jails so you can see what its like working custody.
    "You fight the way you Train"

  5. #5
    Member Array LethalStang's Avatar
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    Very boring. I was always put on the yard first, even though we rotated posts every 4 hours. I cooked many days out there in 95* in uniform while watching a bunch of thugs lift weights and be stupid. Some people love the work but i hated it. You might as well be doing time yourself.
    Quote Originally Posted by rottkeeper View Post
    If you are living your life worried about being a victim all the time and not enjoying life to the fullest, you are already a victim...
    -You don't know what you don't see-

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  6. #6
    Member Array black knife's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LethalStang View Post
    Very boring. I was always put on the yard first, even though we rotated posts every 4 hours. I cooked many days out there in 95* in uniform while watching a bunch of thugs lift weights and be stupid. Some people love the work but i hated it. You might as well be doing time yourself.
    I heard that....I worked in a prison located in the desert....man it would get to 120+ degrees and my boots would get hot.

    Some CO's would bring in dope for inmates or the female CO's would get caught having sex with the inmates....what a joke...avoid at all costs
    "You fight the way you Train"

  7. #7
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    Dang, you guys just took the wind right out of the soon to be rookie's sails.
    "Just blame Sixto"

  8. #8
    Ex Member Array BikerRN's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thegear234 View Post
    Just curious how many Correctional Officers we have on DC I'm going to be taking my course this spring and I'm well to put it bluntly Excited!
    Keep your enthusiasm, you will need it.

    There are a lot of lessons learned inside that translate well to the outside. I'm inside by choice, and yes, some of us are considered LEO's no matter what the "real cops" think.

    Inside you will learn about the most important thing, and really the only thing, RESPECT and how to talk to people, not at them. I've talked with a lot of city, county, state and federal LEO's and none have ever complained about a former C.O. who now works the street. If you can hack it inside, you really and truly can make it anywhere.

    Working inside the wire is a very negative environment. Yes, it almost like doing time yourself. It will be what you make of it. It can be boring, if you want it to be. You could use that boredom to do cell searches, work snitches, monitor phone calls, do breathalysers, and many other jobs that maintain the security of the institution.

    For the police officers that think C.O.'s are just prison guards, some are and some aren't. Just like there are police officers and there are Cops. To put it bluntly, I don't respect "police officers" but I respect Cops. You will learn the difference at some point in the future. Most LEO's can't do the job inside, and that is a pity in my opinion. Knowing how to talk to people is an important skill that I see underutilized by a lot of police officers.

    Take care, stay safe and always keep your word. That is the only thing you will have on the inside.

    Biker

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    VIP Member Array mcp1810's Avatar
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    Gee guys, you are all sunshine and happiness here! What about the down side of the job?

    I was not a C.O. but was a steward in a union that also represented our jail staff. Talking with their stewards, it was not a lot of fun. But it was a job with (where we were) good pay and benefits.

    Things to keep in mind. It is a 24/7/365 operation. While you are low man on the totem pole no one cares when you want your vacation, what hours or days you want to work. All that is usually (not always though) done by seniority. If your significant other has a problem with you not being home for holiday dinners etc. you might want to reconsider. Depending on staffing, turn over rate etc. it could be five years or more before you get part of a weekend off on a regular basis. And even then you might have to work the midnight or evening shift to get it.

    Oh yeah, you will get to meet the nicest people!

    If you go in with your eyes open it could be a positive experience. But make sure you know what you are getting yourself into.
    Infowars- Proving David Hannum right on a daily basis

  10. #10
    Member Array LethalStang's Avatar
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    Dont forget about working 12 hours with no breaks, eat lunch on the fly between rotations. I hear working at the jail here is alright and have applied to it, but working in a prison is nothing but ______.
    Quote Originally Posted by rottkeeper View Post
    If you are living your life worried about being a victim all the time and not enjoying life to the fullest, you are already a victim...
    -You don't know what you don't see-

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  11. #11
    VIP Member Array rottkeeper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mcp1810 View Post
    Gee guys, you are all sunshine and happiness here! What about the down side of the job?

    I was not a C.O. but was a steward in a union that also represented our jail staff. Talking with their stewards, it was not a lot of fun. But it was a job with (where we were) good pay and benefits.

    Things to keep in mind. It is a 24/7/365 operation. While you are low man on the totem pole no one cares when you want your vacation, what hours or days you want to work. All that is usually (not always though) done by seniority. If your significant other has a problem with you not being home for holiday dinners etc. you might want to reconsider. Depending on staffing, turn over rate etc. it could be five years or more before you get part of a weekend off on a regular basis. And even then you might have to work the midnight or evening shift to get it.

    Oh yeah, you will get to meet the nicest people!

    If you go in with your eyes open it could be a positive experience. But make sure you know what you are getting yourself into.
    Along with what mcp1810 said look forward to mandated overtime. I have had to do three and four x-tra shifts a week when the LT. would call me in my unit to say I was going to be my own relief officer for the following shift. 16 hours in the same housing unit gets a little old after a while. Sometimes I would catch a break and they would assign me to booking, escort, or the SHU/MHU.

    And rest assured you will get ample opportunity to deal with feces, urine and spit.

    Forget about your personal feelings about people who commit crimes such as child molesters as you will not only meet plenty you will also have the charge of ensuring their safety during their stay. If they get hurt do to officer negligence you and the facility are in deep do-do.

    It's not all bad but it helps to know what you will be dealing with. Glamor and respect are two words you will not here much when describing the job.

    All that said, should you go for it.... ALWAYS watch your six and have a safe tour.
    Last edited by rottkeeper; January 3rd, 2010 at 02:02 AM. Reason: Tired eyes
    For as the lightning comes from the east and flashes to the west, so also will the coming of the son of man be. Mathew 24:27

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  12. #12
    Member Array LethalStang's Avatar
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    One of the hardest things for me to wrap around when in there is the fact that you do NO physical work or anything, everything is done by inmates. If you see a piece of trash on the ground, you dont dare pick it up, you call over an inmate to do it. If you need a chair to sit down, you call an inmate to go get you one. Food trucks get unloaded my inmates in assembly lines, etc etc etc. The hardest thing is dealing with boredom that is always hovered by intimidation, anxiety, and a bit of fear. Best bet is to work for county or maybe state (which is what i did). The Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) is rediculous, the inmates word has higher regard than the officer. Heaven forbid you have to use a bit of force on an inmate, you'll be the one doing the explaining in order to keep your job.
    Quote Originally Posted by rottkeeper View Post
    If you are living your life worried about being a victim all the time and not enjoying life to the fullest, you are already a victim...
    -You don't know what you don't see-

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  13. #13
    Senior Member Array Katana's Avatar
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    Keep your cool, NEVER give your word if you're not 100% sure you can keep it, and always remember that you're outnumbered every second that you're there.

    It can be a rewarding job, and in fact, some of the jobs people on here didn't like due to the boredom were jobs I liked due to being left alone, like outside mobile patrol, control tower, and office work.

    Also something you need to remember, the inmates are paying attention, to every little thing you do, what you drive, everything about you. They don't have much else to do.

    One last thing, be fair to everyone, not necessarily nice, but fair.
    "Stand your ground, don't fire unless fired upon, but if they mean to have a war, let it begin here!" - John Parker April 19th, 1775 Lexington, MA

    Μολών λαβέ!

  14. #14
    Senior Member Array bps3040's Avatar
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    And rest assured you will get ample opportunity to deal with feces, urine and spit
    I have never been a guard, but I married into a family that.....half the family are prison guards (one is assistent warden and one was the leader of the squad when they had to go in and get a inmate) and the otherside of the family are the prisoners, lol. Most of the stories involve the above quote. My best friend is now a head maintenance guy at 2 prisons.... no, thank you. I wish you the best luck.
    Socialism: A great Idea...'til you run out of other people's money. Margaret Thatcher

    "A man without a gun is a subject, a man with a gun is a citizen."
    ~Ted Nugent

  15. #15
    VIP Member Array Sig 210's Avatar
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    Worked as a CO for about a year in WV. Before I would work as a CO again I would live under the I-44 overpass at Exit 30.

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