Sheriff's New Ride!

This is a discussion on Sheriff's New Ride! within the Law Enforcement, Military & Homeland Security Discussion forums, part of the Related Topics category; Read the door on the new car! Muscle-bound Mustang sends a message to drug dealers, Saginaw County sheriff says: 'We will take your things.' | ...

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Thread: Sheriff's New Ride!

  1. #1
    Member Array seanhodges's Avatar
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  3. #2
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    Outstanding! More of it!
    "Mind own business"
    "Always cut cards"

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    Distinguished Member Array C9H13NO3's Avatar
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    Nice. Wonder if it's true.
    -Ryan

    All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing.

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    Distinguished Member Array BigStick's Avatar
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    That's awsome! I think criminals should finance more LEO programs that way too.

    When I was back in grade school, the local D.A.R.E. officer's car was a Camero that had been confiscated. We all thought that was really cool.


    Edit: Did you read some of the comments? Some people are just completely clueless!
    Walk softly ...

  6. #5
    Senior Member Array dsee11789's Avatar
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    He sounds like a cool guy. It is definately a good idea.

    Ohio State Highay Patrol had a couple Red Iroc Z camaros that they confiscated and outfitted for Patrol. I saw one a long time ago.



    Found a Pontiac too.

    Exodus 22:2 "If a thief is caught breaking in and is struck so that he dies, the defender is not guilty of bloodshed"

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    VIP Member Array rottkeeper's Avatar
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    Our DARE (Drug and Alcohol Resistance Education) vehicle is a confiscated from drug dealers.

    One word to the sheriff though, he may become a target ''flaunting'' that car around as he says.
    For as the lightning comes from the east and flashes to the west, so also will the coming of the son of man be. Mathew 24:27

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    OSP has quite a few Mustangs, Camero's etc. Most of the confiscated cars and other assets go directly to the the several drug task forces throughout the state. So, the public never really gets to see exactly what was taken and how its being used. I would imagine other states are the same way.
    "Just blame Sixto"

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    That is AWESOME!

    More should do the same.
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants."
    Thomas Jefferson

  10. #9
    Distinguished Member Array Rugergirl's Avatar
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    I remember the prototype car:

    1970 Mustang Boss 429 - Mustang Monthly Magazine
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    Member Array gmark340's Avatar
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    As a police officer and attorney, I think that the drug forfeiture laws have the potential to create serious conflicts of interest. On the surface, everyone supports them. However, in essence, they can turn a police department into a legalized gang. It's one thing for forfeited assets to go directly to the state, to be divided up and doled out by someone not involved in acquiring them. It's another for the acquiring department to benefit directly from what they seize. When these laws were first introduced, there were issues regarding safeguards or materiality levels. I recall a case involving a luxury yacht that was seized after a party because a guest had left behind a joint. I don't know whether the owner eventually got it back. If one of you transported a child's friend who happened to leave behind a remainder of a joint and this led to a seizure of your vehicle, which it could very well the way some of these laws are written, I think opinions about this practice would change quickly. Bottom line, just as police officers are generally not permitted to accept rewards for doing what they are paid to do, I don't think departments should be able to directly enrich themselves by doing what they are already budgeted to do.

  12. #11
    Ex Member Array BikerRN's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gmark340 View Post
    As a police officer and attorney, I think that the drug forfeiture laws have the potential to create serious conflicts of interest. On the surface, everyone supports them. However, in essence, they can turn a police department into a legalized gang. It's one thing for forfeited assets to go directly to the state, to be divided up and doled out by someone not involved in acquiring them. It's another for the acquiring department to benefit directly from what they seize. When these laws were first introduced, there were issues regarding safeguards or materiality levels. I recall a case involving a luxury yacht that was seized after a party because a guest had left behind a joint. I don't know whether the owner eventually got it back. If one of you transported a child's friend who happened to leave behind a remainder of a joint and this led to a seizure of your vehicle, which it could very well the way some of these laws are written, I think opinions about this practice would change quickly. Bottom line, just as police officers are generally not permitted to accept rewards for doing what they are paid to do, I don't think departments should be able to directly enrich themselves by doing what they are already budgeted to do.


    You obviously are a learned person that understands a little bit about the document you swore to uphold and defend. You also have the ability, far too uncommon in this day and age I think, to see the long term consequences of actions.

    Biker

  13. #12
    Member Array Glock30SF's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gmark340 View Post
    As a police officer and attorney, I think that the drug forfeiture laws have the potential to create serious conflicts of interest. On the surface, everyone supports them. However, in essence, they can turn a police department into a legalized gang. It's one thing for forfeited assets to go directly to the state, to be divided up and doled out by someone not involved in acquiring them. It's another for the acquiring department to benefit directly from what they seize. When these laws were first introduced, there were issues regarding safeguards or materiality levels. I recall a case involving a luxury yacht that was seized after a party because a guest had left behind a joint. I don't know whether the owner eventually got it back. If one of you transported a child's friend who happened to leave behind a remainder of a joint and this led to a seizure of your vehicle, which it could very well the way some of these laws are written, I think opinions about this practice would change quickly. Bottom line, just as police officers are generally not permitted to accept rewards for doing what they are paid to do, I don't think departments should be able to directly enrich themselves by doing what they are already budgeted to do.

    Saved me some typing. Thanks
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  14. #13
    Senior Member Array dsee11789's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gmark340 View Post
    As a police officer and attorney, I think that the drug forfeiture laws have the potential to create serious conflicts of interest. On the surface, everyone supports them. However, in essence, they can turn a police department into a legalized gang. It's one thing for forfeited assets to go directly to the state, to be divided up and doled out by someone not involved in acquiring them. It's another for the acquiring department to benefit directly from what they seize. When these laws were first introduced, there were issues regarding safeguards or materiality levels. I recall a case involving a luxury yacht that was seized after a party because a guest had left behind a joint. I don't know whether the owner eventually got it back. If one of you transported a child's friend who happened to leave behind a remainder of a joint and this led to a seizure of your vehicle, which it could very well the way some of these laws are written, I think opinions about this practice would change quickly. Bottom line, just as police officers are generally not permitted to accept rewards for doing what they are paid to do, I don't think departments should be able to directly enrich themselves by doing what they are already budgeted to do.

    I agree. There was an entire Season of The Shield that focused on these types of seizures and corruption in the PD. I know its just a TV show but its out there. It happens.

    But at the same time. I love seeing it happen. I hate seeing drug dealers rolling around in their $100,000 cars when they did nothing to earn it.

    Even though technically they are entrepreneurs and do have the skills to run a business (acounting, inventory, employees, pay offs) lol.
    Exodus 22:2 "If a thief is caught breaking in and is struck so that he dies, the defender is not guilty of bloodshed"

  15. #14
    VIP Member Array jwhite75's Avatar
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    Our Local SD took a Lexus sedan from a drug dealer and put it on patrol. Dumbest thing I ever saw.
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    VIP Member Array ExSoldier's Avatar
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    Florida Highway Patrol does this too. I remember back in the late 80s or early 90s one of the Trooper's busted a doper making a run over by Tampa. He got the guy cold with dope in the vehicle and as a reward the FHP gave it to the trooper to use as a patrol vehicle. They painted the Porsche 911 turbo Black and Yellow and put all the required equipment for pursuit (I'm guessing it didn't need much in the way of engine upgrades) like siren and lights. He used it for like 10 years more until he retired....
    Former Army Infantry Captain; 25 yrs as an NRA Certified Instructor; Avid practitioner of the martial art: KLIK-PAO.

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