U.S. Firearms Attorney

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  1. #16
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    Practicing gun law in Massachusetts - talk about a "target-rich environment!"
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    Welcome to DC, Mr. Cohen. I have a question.

    What is it about Massachusetts that makes it attractive to firearms manufacturers?

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    A U.S Firearms attorney from the Peoples Republic of Massachusetts?

    For some reason...that scares me purt near to death.

    Welcome to the forum... I think...
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  10. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doghandler View Post
    Welcome to DC, Mr. Cohen. I have a question.

    What is it about Massachusetts that makes it attractive to firearms manufacturers?
    Not to steal Atty Cohen's thunder, but here's a partial answer:

    New England was the center of American manufacturing since the arrival of the Europeans. Abundant water power, iron ore and wood for fuel made it easy, and the relative population density compared to the South gave NEw England a big head start with expanding manufacturing. Sam Colt, those wacky Smith and Wesson boys and Ollie Winchester all grew up in New England and started production there, primarily on or close to the Connecticut River. Nothing succeeds like success, and the rapid growth of the post-Civil War America and the westward expansion created opportunities for entrepreneurs and designers to start up lots of firearms companies. Once the big names were established, momentum kept them alive through numerous economic upheavals, and numerous smaller start-up companies located elsewhere in the US ultimately couldn't compete. It wasn't until the post-Viet Nam era that foreign competition started to erode the New England firearms manufacturing base, and by that time the exodus of skilled workers from the that high cost-of-living region had begun. Smith and Wesson underwent "ownership du jour" for a number of years and suffered from a lack of vision for their product line. Colt found more easy money in military contracts than in satisfying civilian consumers, and dropped their classic revolver lines and stamped out poor quality automatics until new owners and leadership took the plunge to invest in new tooling. Remington sold off their enormous Bridgeport factory (and even their fabulous Lordship shotgun facility) and disappeared from New England. Savage, Iver Johnson, Harrington & Richardson, and Stevens all underwent changes in ownership and today most have little or no direct lineage back to their beginnings. The one real success story is Ruger, which started after WWII with a product line of one and which has since grown into one of the most successful American firearms manufacturers, and achieved that success without any significant military contracts or off-shoring of manufacturing.

    Some relevant history here: Gun Manufacturing in New England, 1850-1900 - Yahoo! Voices - voices.yahoo.com

    There's a big long list of them that made their home in either Massachusetts or Connecticut, few of which remain there today.
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    Welcome aboard Jesse from the great state of Pennsylvania! You better hang onto your shorts - as soon as member's read your offer - questions will roll in like crazy!

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    Quote Originally Posted by gasmitty View Post
    Not to steal Atty Cohen's thunder, but here's a partial answer:

    New England was the center of American manufacturing since the arrival of the Europeans. Abundant water power, iron ore and wood for fuel made it easy, and the relative population density compared to the South gave NEw England a big head start with expanding manufacturing. Sam Colt, those wacky Smith and Wesson boys and Ollie Winchester all grew up in New England and started production there, primarily on or close to the Connecticut River. Nothing succeeds like success, and the rapid growth of the post-Civil War America and the westward expansion created opportunities for entrepreneurs and designers to start up lots of firearms companies. Once the big names were established, momentum kept them alive through numerous economic upheavals, and numerous smaller start-up companies located elsewhere in the US ultimately couldn't compete. It wasn't until the post-Viet Nam era that foreign competition started to erode the New England firearms manufacturing base, and by that time the exodus of skilled workers from the that high cost-of-living region had begun. Smith and Wesson underwent "ownership du jour" for a number of years and suffered from a lack of vision for their product line. Colt found more easy money in military contracts than in satisfying civilian consumers, and dropped their classic revolver lines and stamped out poor quality automatics until new owners and leadership took the plunge to invest in new tooling. Remington sold off their enormous Bridgeport factory (and even their fabulous Lordship shotgun facility) and disappeared from New England. Savage, Iver Johnson, Harrington & Richardson, and Stevens all underwent changes in ownership and today most have little or no direct lineage back to their beginnings. The one real success story is Ruger, which started after WWII with a product line of one and which has since grown into one of the most successful American firearms manufacturers, and achieved that success without any significant military contracts or off-shoring of manufacturing.

    Some relevant history here: Gun Manufacturing in New England, 1850-1900 - Yahoo! Voices - voices.yahoo.com

    There's a big long list of them that made their home in either Massachusetts or Connecticut, few of which remain there today.
    Thanks for sharing that. I don't have anything to add to that interesting historical analysis.

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    Welcome, from California, Mr. Cohen. I believe that there is a core of public servants who protect the Constitution and its protection of our rights. And, I believe that you are one of these helping to solidify the Second Amendment's protection of our rights.
    Do you see any cases for federal preemption of state restrictions on carrying by honest citizens for self defense on the horizon that have any likelihood of a Supreme Court hearing or any cases that may override infringement of the right to bear arms?
    Americans understood the right of self-preservation as permitting a citizen to repel force by force
    when the intervention of society... may be too late to prevent an injury.
    -Blackstone’s Commentaries 145–146, n. 42 (1803) in District of Columbia v. Heller, 554 U.S. 570 (2008)

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    Welcome aboard!

    sent via iCarry

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