Gun found at Wilson High in Portsmouth; person detained

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Thread: Gun found at Wilson High in Portsmouth; person detained

  1. #1
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    Gun found at Wilson High in Portsmouth; person detained

    School are Gun Free Zones -- how can this be?

    Gun found at Wilson High in Portsmouth; person detained | HamptonRoads.com | PilotOnline.com

    By Cindy Clayton
    Patrick Wilson
    The Virginian-Pilot
    April 28, 2010
    PORTSMOUTH

    A gun was found at Woodrow Wilson High School this afternoon and a person was detained, but the details of the incident were unclear, said Detective Jan Westerbeck, a police spokeswoman.

    The incident was reported to police shortly before 1 p.m. at the school, located at 1401 Elmhurst Lane. She said she did not yet know whether the gun had been fired.

    Westerbeck said students have been evacuated to a football stadium. Parents can go to get them.

    One parent, John Cheeks, said at the scene hed gotten a call from his son, a student. He saw a kid with a gun and he was kind of brandishing it. He took off and got to a phone and called me. His son told him he was safe.

    Several police vehicles were at the school shortly after 1 p.m, and police had closed down the road in front of the school, with officers diverting traffic. No ambulances were on hand at that time, and the situation appeared fairly calm.

    The city's Fire, Rescue and Emergency Services workers were not called to the scene, said Capt. Paul Hoyle, spokesman.

    Police had not released any other details by 1:25 p.m.

    For an update, come back later to PilotOnline.com and read The Virginian-Pilot tomorrow
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    Distinguished Member Array jumpwing's Avatar
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    That'll be a suspension for sure!
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    Update -- shots fired

    Student detained after shots were fired at Portsmouth high school - dailypress.com

    PORTSMOUTH
    A student at Woodrow Wilson High School in Portsmouth is being interviewed by police after shots were fired at the school today. Police say the student fired three shots from a handgun inside the school.

    The student, identified only as a juvenile male, had been suspended earlier in the week for disorderly conduct, said Joseph Wiggins, director of communications for Portsmouth Public Schools.

    No one was injured. Students were evacuated to an athletic field and then released.

    Det. John Doyle said that the student entered the building through a rear door around 12:15 p.m. He then fired one shot into a wall of the classroom that houses in-school suspensions and two shots into the ceiling of the school cafeteria. There were approximately 150 students in the cafeteria at the time.

    The student left the gun and fled the school. He was apprehended by a security officer and a school administrator, and the gun was recovered.
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    Oh man......another one!

    Thank God nobody was injured or worse.

    A STUPID adult decision that deserves a HARSH adult sentence!
    "Just getting a concealed carry permit means you haven't commited a crime yet. CCP holders commit crimes." Daniel Vice, senior attorney for the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence, quoted on Fox & Friends, 8 Jul, 2008

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    Update

    Prosecutor wants to try student in school shooting as adult | HamptonRoads.com | PilotOnline.com

    Here's the problem:

    The student's criminal record also includes a probation violation, according to information from the hearing. He was, at one time, committed to the State Department of Juvenile Justice and was released on probation in April 2008.
    not the level of security!

    As in:

    "They should have security everywhere," said Smith's sister
    Prosecutor wants to try student in school shooting as adult

    By Cheryl Ross
    Cindy Clayton
    Janie Bryant
    Patrick Wilson
    The Virginian-Pilot
    April 29, 2010
    PORTSMOUTH

    The city's top prosecutor said this morning that he wants the student charged with firing shots inside Woodrow Wilson High School on Wednesday to be tried as an adult.

    During the 15-year-old student's arraignment in Juvenile and Domestic Relations Court this morning, a probation officer provided information on prior offenses, including several counts of assault and battery.

    The student, whose name is not being published because of his age, allegedly approached a locked door and brandished a gun to get a someone inside to open it, according to a summary read in court.

    He is accused of going into a classroom and brandishing the gun, then leaving and firing into the wall of another occupied classroom.

    He then fired twice in a crowded cafeteria, before putting the gun on a table and running away, according to the summary. No one was injured and at least one teacher followed him.

    The student's criminal record also includes a probation violation, according to information from the hearing. He was, at one time, committed to the State Department of Juvenile Justice and was released on probation in April 2008.

    A judge set a hearing for May 17. Family members of the student declined to comment after the arraignment.

    At the high school this morning, students who arrived for classes said they were still shaken by Wednesday's events.

    Im kind of scared because I didnt want to come back today," said Deja Smith, 13. The ninth-grader, who arrived shortly after 7 a.m. with her sister, said she figured everything would be fine because the student charged with firing the shots inside a crowded cafeteria and hallway on Wednesday is in the custody of authorities. No one was injured.

    "They should have security everywhere," said Smith's sister, 15-year-old De'Nisha Smith. Im scared, but I gotta go in there some time.

    Betty DiGennaro said she let her daughter, Brittany, stay home from school today despite a recorded message from school officials on Wednesday saying security would be increased today and counselors would be onsite. The freshman, who witnessed the shooting, was still shaken by what she saw.

    School officials said the door that the student used to enter the building prior to the shooting was locked and that he couldn't have entered unless he had a swipe card or someone let him in.

    "A kid let him in. That's what we believe," Superintendent David Stuckwisch said.

    School leaders said they don't know whether metal detectors at the front entrance were turned on Wednesday. Surveillance cameras rolled throughout the school, where they are supposed to be monitored by someone inside the principal's office.

    Yet school officials say the student, a 15-year-old arrested and charged by Portsmouth police in connection with the incident, got in.

    It was unclear by 9 a.m. today how many students returned to classes and whether the metal detectors were used or what additional security measures were in place.

    The shooting has school leaders wrestling with how it happened and what they could have done to stop it.

    "If there is a way of preventing it, I don't know how," Stuckwisch said. "I don't think we can afford to place someone at every door."

    "The analogy I would draw about putting somebody at every door is, it would be like putting an air marshal on every plane."

    Senior Crystal Campbell and her friends were in the school cafeteria about 12:15 p.m.when they heard a gunshot. They looked up and saw the gunman.

    "We're jumping, we're just trying to get under tables and stuff," Campbell said. "We were up against the wall and the table, crouched down.

    "I thought that people were getting killed. I didn't know what was going on."

    Campbell called the police: "There's been gunshots at Wilson High School and we need some help."

    Aikeem Wilson saw the gunman walk in, hold the weapon up in the air and fire it into the ceiling.

    "He shot off one shot then he walked past me, and as he walked past me, he reloaded the gun and then he let off another shot," the 18-year-old senior said.

    Wilson said the gunman, whom he recognized, smiled as he carried what looked like a semiautomatic weapon.

    "I sat there and I was looking at him the whole time," Wilson said. "He made eye contact, but he wasn't targeting me."

    Students screamed and ran. Many pushed and shoved as they made their way out of the school's main door, he said.

    After the second shot, Wilson fled out a side door.

    Teachers opened a divider in the cafeteria so students could slide underneath it to get out, Campbell said.

    An announcement over the intercom asked all students to go to their fourth block and stay there, but many sought comfort outside, Wilson said.

    He sought refuge in the school's football stadium with other students. They called their parents and then waited to be taken home, he said.

    Shortly after 12:15 p.m., police quickly closed down the main road in front of the school, Elmhurst Lane, and started diverting traffic.

    Many parents who had received frantic text messages and phone calls from their children arrived.

    Debbie Meginley was in the shower when she got a text message from her daughter, a freshman at the school.

    "Mom someones shooting!!" it said.

    Meginley quickly got dressed and drove a few blocks to Wilson. She picked up her daughter in the school's parking lot.

    Also getting picked up was Brittany DiGennaro, who threw her arms around her mother and sobbed. The freshman said she was in the cafeteria at the time of the shooting. She said she phoned her grandmother and told her what happened.

    Around 1:30 p.m., while Brittany's mother stood on a sidewalk blocks from the school, a voice mail came through her cell phone from Wilson High.

    The message, a recording from the school's principal, Timothy E. Johnson, informed parents and guardians about the shooting. The recording also stated that school would start as regularly scheduled today, Stuckwisch said.

    School leaders say the student charged in connection with the incident was suspended earlier this week for disorderly conduct or fighting.

    A police officer and school staff member apprehended the student outside of the school near Cherokee Road on Wednesday afternoon, Portsmouth police Detective John Doyle said. The gun was recovered inside the school, Doyle said.

    Police charged the student with discharging a firearm within or at an occupied school, brandishing a firearm on school property or within 1,000 feet of school property, and possession of a handgun while under the age of 18, according to a news release.

    The student, whose name was not released by police because of his age, is being held at the Tidewater Detention Home. The Virginian-Pilot generally does not name juveniles unless they have been charged as adults.

    Counselors will be available at Wilson today.

    Meginley said it wouldn't hurt if metal detectors were turned on all throughout the school day.

    Joseph Wiggins, the school's director of communications, said he doesn't know where else, besides the school's front entrance, metal detectors are present. He also said he doesn't know whether they were turned on Wednesday.

    Metal detectors are in all the division's middle and high schools, he said. Stuckwisch said the division's principals determine when to turn them on. It's just not practical to run them every day, Stuckwisch said.

    Nearly 1,200 students attend Wilson, so checking every student each day could eat up too much classroom instruction time, he said.

    Pilot writer Cherise Newsome contributed to this report.
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    Thumbs down Update 2

    They still don't get it. There are no "gun free zones".

    Security doesn't come from LEO, Lock doors, metal detectors, etc.

    What really frost me is the coverage and the administrators' response reinforces the idea that the "Unarmed Victim Zone, security plan, Lock doors, metal detectors, etc. should have worked and that things are safe now, because of them. That reinforcement just expands the idea of safety through a nanny state.

    The problem is buried at the end of the article,


    A man who identified himself as the suspect's father said that his son was on probation and was being monitored by a probation officer and counselors.

    "He was in and out of trouble at school, no question about that.

    "He was going through the system," he said. "But nothing like this right here, what happened yesterday."

    The father said he has full custody of him and was out of town Wednesday.

    "We really don't know why he flared up to this magnitude," he said. "There's a whole lot that I still don't even understand."

    After shooting, Wilson High students wary about security | HamptonRoads.com | PilotOnline.com

    After shooting, Wilson High students wary about

    By Cheryl Ross
    Janie Bryant
    The Virginian-Pilot
    April 30, 2010
    PORTSMOUTH

    Students said Thursday that sneaking into Woodrow Wilson High School from locked doors happens routinely and that it's easy.

    While school officials said side and rear doors can be opened only with a swipe card or by someone on the inside, a group of students said there's another way: the pencil.

    Students use them sometimes to prop open locked doors for classmates, Rusty Merritt, 16, a sophomore said.

    Rusty and his peers stood outside Wilson after school Thursday, complaining about how security is handled. The day before, school authorities and police said a student entered the building through a back door and fired shots inside.

    No one was injured, and a 15-year-old was arrested.

    School officials said they didn't know whether metal detectors that they insisted would be used hours after the incident were in use Thursday. However, students said they weren't and can't remember them ever being used.

    They described a morning scene where students were randomly patted down and their bags, hats and socks searched.

    "They should have checked more people, maybe even everybody, to make sure they didn't have any kind of contraband," said Asim Smith, a 16-year-old sophomore.

    Lindsay Hudson, a 14-year-old freshman, said, "They should have at least used the metal detectors today.

    "You would think they would have had a wake-up call."

    Some students said there was a beefed- up police presence outside the school at the start of the day and during lunch in the cafeteria. They said there was a lot of discussion among themselves about the shooting. Several said that they recall more than three shots being fired, as was reported by police.

    Joseph Wiggins, the division's director of communications, said that Wilson, like the city's other schools, has a safety plan that it followed on Wednesday.

    Superintendent David Stuckwisch said the division employs the same security procedures that "pretty much every school division in South Hampton Roads uses in their buildings."

    Asked whether the division could do anything to improve its safety and security measures, Stuckwisch said, "I'm not sure what we should change."

    Stuckwisch said he's relieved that no one was injured. However, he said, "We've got to move on to other things in this school system."

    "That's a one-time event and it's done, and we've got to move on to the SOLs, " he said, referring to the state's standardized tests.

    Stuckwisch said that Wilson Principal Timothy E. Johnson was busy Thursday. The principal's "first and foremost duty" is to "prepare for the SOLs that are coming up in a couple of weeks," Stuckwisch said.

    School officials did not provide The Virginian-Pilot with Wilson's Thursday attendance numbers, but some students estimated that most teachers were at school while anywhere from a third to half of Wilson's nearly 1,200 students didn't show.

    Betty DiGennaro said she let her daughter stay home despite a recorded message from school officials on Wednesday that stated that security would be increased and counselors would be available. Brittany was still shaken by the shooting, her mother said.

    Students described pandemonium in the lunchroom Wednesday sometime after 12:15 p.m. as they tried to escape after the shooting.

    Wiggins said three staff members chased and caught the suspect outside the school and a police officer provided the handcuffs.

    The city's top prosecutor, Commonwealth's Attorney Earle C. Mobley, took steps Thursday to try the student as an adult.

    During the student's arraignment in Juvenile and Domestic Relations Court, a probation officer provided information on prior offenses, including several counts of assault and battery.

    The student, whose name is being withheld because of his age, allegedly approached a locked door and brandished a gun to get someone inside to open it, according to a summary read in court. The Virginian-Pilot generally does not name juveniles unless they have been charged as adults.

    The student is accused of going into a classroom and brandishing the gun, then leaving and firing into the wall of another occupied classroom.

    He then went to a crowded cafeteria, where he fired shots into the ceiling before putting the gun on a table and running away, according to a court summary. The student had been suspended earlier in the week for disorderly conduct or fighting, school officials said.

    According to information at the hearing, the student's prior record also includes a probation violation. He was, at one time, committed to the Department of Juvenile Justice and was released on probation in April 2008.

    A judge set a hearing for May 17.

    The youth was arraigned on charges of both brandishing and discharging a firearm in an occupied building and underage possession of a firearm. Police have said other charges may be pending.

    Mobley would not comment on what kind of prison time the charges carry. But, according to the state code, if the suspect is tried as an adult, the three charges would carry a combined penalty of up to 16 years.

    Mobley called the school shooting a "very troubling situation."

    A man who identified himself as the suspect's father said that his son was on probation and was being monitored by a probation officer and counselors.

    "He was in and out of trouble at school, no question about that.

    "He was going through the system," he said. "But nothing like this right here, what happened yesterday."

    The father said he has full custody of him and was out of town Wednesday.

    "We really don't know why he flared up to this magnitude," he said. "There's a whole lot that I still don't even understand."

    His son had run indoor track at Wilson, which helped him, he said.

    "During this time, he was very excited about track," he said. "He showed a whole lot of potential that he could move to the next level."

    Pilot writer Patrick Wilson contributed to this report.

    Cheryl Ross, (757) 446-2443, cheryl.ross@pilotonline.com
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    So, what did you expect...

    that they would recommend the teachers and staff be armed?



    What makes schools safer? Watchful eyes, experts say. | HamptonRoads.com | PilotOnline.com

    What makes schools safer? Watchful eyes, experts say.


    By Cheryl Ross
    The Virginian-Pilot
    May 13, 2010
    PORTSMOUTH

    Metal detectors, cameras and security guards aren't enough to keep guns out of schools and students safe.

    The best defense is eyes and ears trained to recognize and report threats.

    That's what school safety experts say two weeks after a shooting at Wilson High, when, police say, a 15-year-old student sneaked in with a gun and fired it.

    Portsmouth school officials responded by beefing up security and promising to use metal detectors. But that's not enough, school safety experts say.

    "Any type of security equipment, at its best, is a supplement but not a substitute for a well-trained, highly alert staff and student body," said Ken Trump, president of Cleveland-based National School Safety and Security Services.

    Peter Blauvelt, president of the West Virginia-based National Alliance for Safe Schools, sounded a similar note.

    "The best security in the world is sitting down and talking with kids about what the problems are," Blauvelt said.

    Police say the gunman shot into a classroom wall and into the ceiling of a crowded cafeteria. Chaos ensued, but no one was hurt.

    The teen charged in the shooting, who had been suspended for disorderly conduct or fighting, is not being named because of his age. The Virginian-Pilot generally does not name juveniles unless they have been charged as adults.

    Days after the incident, school officials ordered random metal detector checks and more security and police patrolling the halls. Still some parents and students have complained that it's not enough and asked for security guards stationed at every school door.

    "It is very normal for parents and the community to want to demand some type of guarantee and visible, tangible evidence of heightened security immediately after an incident," Trump said. "That puts school officials into a corner and puts very unrealistic expectations on them, because no one can guarantee 100 percent security anywhere, from the school house to the White House."

    While Trump said school violence seems to be more prevalent in some communities, he said it's hard to gauge the true number of incidents nationwide.

    Still, there's one trend he's seeing, he said, Administrators across the country are dealing with more aggressive behavior and more aggression in younger students, even at the elementary level.

    It's emerging at a time when federal, state and local education budgets for school safety programs are being dramatically cut, he said.

    Such cuts are happening in Portsmouth.

    After several years of increasing security spending, division leaders want to reduce that funding, from about $1.14 million this school year to about $837,000 next school year.

    Portsmouth officials have said that putting every person that enters their schools through metal detectors could take away valuable instruction time. Some safety experts also cite the high costs of running them with no guarantee of safety.

    Schools that use them only at select times might miss someone entering with a weapon when the detectors are not running, Trump said.

    Also, he said, someone with a weapon could come on school grounds and shoot outside, or board a school bus with a weapon.

    Stacia Kiestler, a 16-year-old junior at Wilson, said she feels "slightly more secure " with the extra security measures but agreed that staff and students need to be more alert.

    "If someone is suspended, you don't let someone in through the side doors," she said. "If you have a friend and they have a gun or a knife and you know about it, you have a responsibility to tell someone, because you never know if they get angry if they'll use it."

    Blauvelt said school officials also need to go one step further when suspending students and ask: What is he angry about? Is there a reason that he would be coming back to school for retaliation? Does he have access to a weapon at home?

    Depending on what officials learn, Blauvelt said, they should report the suspension to police.

    Joseph Wiggins, Portsmouth school division's director of communications, said questions are generally asked when a student is seriously disciplined. He said he did not know whether that happened with the 15-year-old shooting suspect and couldn't discuss it because it is a "student personnel" matter.

    The student faces charges of underage possession of a firearm, brandishing a firearm, three counts of discharging a firearm while in a school, and one count of breaking and entering while armed with a deadly weapon.

    The commonwealth's attorney is seeking to prosecute him as an adult.

    Today, Superintendent David Stuckwisch is expected to report on the Wilson shooting to the School Board in a closed session.

    Meanwhile, a more comprehensive review will seek to answer questions such as whether safety procedures were followed and what lessons can be learned from the incident, Wiggins said.

    Some Wilson parents and students said school officials should hold a community forum to answer questions and to listen to people's concerns.

    "Give people a chance to have their voice heard," said Lisa Kiestler, Stacia's mom.

    Wiggins said there are no plans for such a forum, but parents and students should feel assured that officials are thoroughly examining the Wilson shooting. School leaders' top concern is the safety of students and staff, he said.

    "If our findings indicate that something needs to be done, we're going to do it."

    Cheryl Ross, (757) 446-2443, cheryl.ross@pilotonline.com
    Now y'll go play safe, now -- and stay alert!
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    Eyes and ears are really great, they will immediately let you know that your about to be shot!
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    How about they publish the name of the criminal....I don't care about his age...he's committing felonies...adult crimes. He knew what he was doing...

    And the cameras?? Give me a break...I have yet to hear about a camera stopping a crime.
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    Lightbulb

    Quote Originally Posted by SIGguy229 View Post
    And the cameras?? Give me a break...I have yet to hear about a camera stopping a crime.


    England has more cameras per population that any other country.

    Yet, unbiased non-personally invested studies show they have not stopped deter crime. Helped solve after the fact, maybe/maybe not.

    BBC NEWS | UK | England | London | 1,000 cameras 'solve one crime'

    Tens of thousands of CCTV cameras, yet 80% of crime unsolved| News | This is London

    CCTV boom has failed to slash crime, say police | UK news | The Guardian

    But stop? Nah!

    How about in the US?

    Burglaries Up Despite Uptown Dallas Crime Cameras - cbs11tv.com

    Right it's coincidence that the crime just happened to be just outside the cameras.

    So, the experts want to install more in the US.

    And, his-dishonor-from-NYC wants to spend millions to install more in NYC.
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