2010 FBI Annual Crime Report (Preliminary) - Page 2

2010 FBI Annual Crime Report (Preliminary)

This is a discussion on 2010 FBI Annual Crime Report (Preliminary) within the In the News: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly forums, part of the The Back Porch category; Your information is old. How crimes are reported hasn't changed in years. When the FBI first started doing the Uniform Crime Reports they had to ...

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Thread: 2010 FBI Annual Crime Report (Preliminary)

  1. #16
    Member Array gruntingfrog's Avatar
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    Your information is old. How crimes are reported hasn't changed in years. When the FBI first started doing the Uniform Crime Reports they had to change the way some states were reporting certain crimes so the information would be comparable, but it hasn't changed significantly since then so comparing crime rates year to year is sound.

    Also, I'm not sure how you can say that crime is up except for the major cities on the coasts in the face of this information:

    Violent crime in non-metropolitan counties decreased 6.4 percent

    Murder and non-negligent manslaughter offenses dropped 25.2 percent in the nation’s smallest cities (under 10,000 in population).

    Aggravated assaults declined in both county groups, with the largest decrease (5.8 percent) reported in non-metropolitan counties.

    Violent crime decreased in all four regions of the country in 2010. There was a 7.5 percent decrease in violent crime in the South, a 5.9 decline in the Midwest, a 5.8 percent decrease in the West, and a 0.4 percent decline in the Northeast.
    Everybody has a plan until they get punched in the face.
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  2. #17
    Member Array KralBlbec's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hamlet View Post
    Don't go there........

    In part this is because the NE had lower violent crime over-all rates for years - and still does - compared to most other areas. States with highest murder rates are in South if I remember correctly.
    DC, Maryland and Delware are all listed in the South. Change that and the numbers would be much different. Including DC in the South really throws off a a lot of numbers. It has much more in common economically and politically with the NE, and isn't even that far south. I find it odd.

    I'm also curious how the breakdown would be of the relationship of to the victim in the North East vs the South. My guess would be it is much more personal in the South. Domestic abuse and so forth, while in the big cities its more random robberies. Robberies in the NE comes out to about 130 (out of 100k) while the South has an average of 159. Guess what though, that includes DC which has over 700. Get into the deep South and the numbers are much closer to 100.

    In the end, numbers are fun to play with but can be used to show a lot of things. You just have to keep in mind that big cities anywhere are going to be more dangerous out at night than smaller communities, even if the numbers say the state is "safer". There are small conservative communities in New York too. You would have to break it down even farther than the state level to really show that distinction.

  3. #18
    Senior Member Array ks kid's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gruntingfrog View Post
    Also, I'm not sure how you can say that crime is up except for the major cities on the coasts in the face of this information:
    The big cities on the coasts are skewing the numbers. Remove the big cities on the coast, and crime is up. It does not make sense that crime would be down in the environment we are in and we all talk about it everyday on this forum. We feel it and we see it in our own communities. In every economic downturn crime has increased, why would now be different? Someone stated earlier that stats can not be trusted and I agree and that is why I pulled the raw data and ran the numbers myself and what I saw did not jive with what was being said by the media. As far the reporting changing, I stand by that, but can not remember what changed. There were some people talking about it, but it did not get much airtime. I did all this when the reports came out and did not save the xls.

  4. #19
    Member Array gruntingfrog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ks kid View Post
    The big cities on the coasts are skewing the numbers. Remove the big cities on the coast, and crime is up. It does not make sense that crime would be down in the environment we are in and we all talk about it everyday on this forum. We feel it and we see it in our own communities. In every economic downturn crime has increased, why would now be different? Someone stated earlier that stats can not be trusted and I agree and that is why I pulled the raw data and ran the numbers myself and what I saw did not jive with what was being said by the media. As far the reporting changing, I stand by that, but can not remember what changed. There were some people talking about it, but it did not get much airtime. I did all this when the reports came out and did not save the xls.
    I'm still not sure I understand. You say you "did all this when the reports came out." The report just came out 2 days ago.

    This sounds like a "just so" story. Crime's up because I think it is and I don't want to see any disconfirming evidence so I'll claim to have done a bunch of research and running the numbers myself. I know it seems like crime is up because we and the news focus on it. When was the last time you heard the following on the news, "1.2 million people in Dallas went about their business today without anything bad happening to them." It happens every day, but we don't hear about it. This is why we rely on numbers and not just that "we feel it and we see it in our own communities."

    As far as the reports changing please find your source and post it. I'm interested.
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  5. #20
    Member Array kaboomkaboom's Avatar
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    "There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies and statistics." Mark Twain

  6. #21
    Member Array BigBaddaBoom's Avatar
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    Nope, I'm not buying it. Any data that is released by Eric Holder and company is to be viewed with a healthy dose of skepticism. Do any of you really feel that crime has decreased? Hmmmmm?
    Si vis pacem, para bellum
    "If you wish for peace, prepare for war"

  7. #22
    Ex Member Array JOHNSMITH's Avatar
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    That is the issue. Crime overall may have decreased, but there is the possibility that the overall demographics of criminals and their victims may have changed. Crims might be spreading out a bit more now, to the suburbs and wealthier areas, since these people are more likely to still have their jobs and some money on them.

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