Vigilantism

Vigilantism

This is a discussion on Vigilantism within the In the News: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly forums, part of the The Back Porch category; This shooting in my state seems to have finally worked its way through the system with predictable results for the shooter. HeraldNet.com - Local news: ...

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  1. #1
    Distinguished Member Array Hoganbeg's Avatar
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    Vigilantism

    This shooting in my state seems to have finally worked its way through the system with predictable results for the shooter.

    HeraldNet.com - Local news: Arlington man who fatally shot burglar gets 12 years for murder


  2. #2
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    The guy must have thought he was living in Texas.

    It's sad that a good natured family man is going away for 12 years and losing his gun rights for the rest of his life.

    Once again, an otherwise good guy let his emotions get the best of him and now he's paying for it.

    On the flip side, the thug won't be breaking into anymore houses.
    -Bark'n
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    "The gun is the great equalizer... For it is the gun, that allows the meek to repel the monsters; Whom are bigger, stronger and without conscience, prey on those who without one, would surely perish."

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    Member Array CaptSmith's Avatar
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    He had a very good Attorney, one of the best in the Everett defense bar...and he got two trials...this matter would have been much different if the now convict hadnt been a "citizen"
    and been able to afford a good defense...Snohomish County can be a dark,dark place when it comes to "justice"......

  4. #4
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    The firearm does not come with any special 'rights', and chasing down the dirtbag after the crime is over is never going to go well for the original victim.
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    VIP Member Array Sig 210's Avatar
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    The firearm does not come with any special 'rights', and chasing down the dirtbag after the crime is over is never going to go well for the original victim.
    +1
    Better to shoot the robber in the house. Chasing down and killing the robber is the wrong way to go.

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    VIP Member Array glockman10mm's Avatar
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    Agree. He should have let it go.
    Ignorance is a long way from stupid, but left unchecked, can get there real fast.

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    VIP Member Array Harryball's Avatar
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    There is a lesson to be learned here...I feel for Earnharts kids.
    Don"t let stupid be your skill set....

    Never be ashamed of a scar. It simply means, that you were stronger than whatever tried to hurt you......

  8. #8
    Member Array protek's Avatar
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    Definitely should have let it go. Yes, the thief was in the wrong, but you can't go hunting down people who have wronged you. I'm still learning all the nuances of WA CC law, but we've got it pretty good as far as 2A rights are concerned. Too bad that this happened. It's an all-around bad situation.

  9. #9
    Distinguished Member Array ArkhmAsylm's Avatar
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    A possible lesson here is that owning a firearm is a right that requires much homework & training, & is not one to be taken lightly.
    "Historical examination of the right to bear arms, from English antecedents to the drafting of the Second Amendment, bears proof that the right to bear arms has consistently been, and should still be, construed as an individual right." -- U.S. District Judge Sam Cummings, Re: U.S. vs Emerson (1999)

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    Senior Member Array Dadsnugun's Avatar
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    I've got to fall in with the "shoulda let it go" camp on this one. Once the burglar had exited the house and there was no imminent danger to himself or family, it became a police matter and should have been left to them, regardless of the likelihood that his items would be recovered. "I want my watch back" is not a valid reason for a back-shot on a fleeing burglar, in the open, 3 hours after-the-fact. IMO. It's a sad outcome for the families of all concerned, to be sure. What's more important, a few pieces of jewelry and a (temporarily) assuaged sense of justice delivered...or 12 years enforced absence from one's family, and a lifetime's remembrance of a life taken in anger?? I know what my answer would be.
    Never pick a fight with an old man...If he's too old to fight, he'll just kill you - John Steinbeck
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    VIP Member Array SIGguy229's Avatar
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    Thus, learning and training should be done with reputable instructors. Reading and learning from boards like this one are good if you're sharing experiences or lessons learned through training...but learning how to handle/draw firearms from a holster via YouTube are poor substitutes for hands-on quality training. Getting a legal opinion online and applying it to your daily routine is also a poor choice. While we can discuss laws from a layman's point of view, if you really need a legal opinion, spend the cash and consult with an attorney with the knowledge and experience of self-defense/castle doctrine laws in your state. An ounce of prevention (or education) beats a pound of cure (or as I call it, "learning by bleeding"--blood, cash, etc.)

    Deciding to carry is an important one...it requires due diligence to educate yourself--not only on the the training and tactics to employ your firearm (I'm assuming all of us have mastered basic marksmanship), but also the laws of your state.

    If you're new to shooting or carrying and think your permit (and gun) gives you a sense of immunity from bad things happening to you, you are sorely mistaken. Seek additional training beyond what is required for your state's permit.

    Note: I am still of the belief that this training SHOULD NOT be mandated by the state (or other entity)...but I believe all who carry should seek additional training.
    Bark'n, Stubborn and Hoganbeg like this.
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  12. #12
    VIP Member Array MitchellCT's Avatar
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    Here's how to do it wrong:

    Earhart shot Ryan Rzechula in the back on Nov. 16, 2009. Earhart, 39, encountered Rzechula about three hours after a break-in at his Arlington house, a quarter-mile away. Earhart had gone looking for the burglar and his wife's missing jewelry. He suspected that Rzechula, 25, was responsible for the break-in and called 911.

    Prosecutors alleged that Earhart shot the unarmed man as he was running away, ignoring Earhart's commands to stop. Rzechula died in a creek bed. His body was discovered two days later. Detectives found jewelry in his pocket that was stolen from Earhart's house.

    When the case went to trial late last year, jurors acquitted Earhart of intentional murder. They were deadlocked over whether he was guilty under a different theory and also couldn't reach a decision on whether he was guilty of manslaughter.

    That left the door open for Snohomish County deputy prosecutor Mara Rozzano to retry the case.


    You can't make this stuff up.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by MitchellCT View Post
    Here's how to do it wrong:

    Earhart shot Ryan Rzechula in the back on Nov. 16, 2009. Earhart, 39, encountered Rzechula about three hours after a break-in at his Arlington house, a quarter-mile away. Earhart had gone looking for the burglar and his wife's missing jewelry. He suspected that Rzechula, 25, was responsible for the break-in and called 911.

    Prosecutors alleged that Earhart shot the unarmed man as he was running away, ignoring Earhart's commands to stop. Rzechula died in a creek bed. His body was discovered two days later. Detectives found jewelry in his pocket that was stolen from Earhart's house.

    When the case went to trial late last year, jurors acquitted Earhart of intentional murder. They were deadlocked over whether he was guilty under a different theory and also couldn't reach a decision on whether he was guilty of manslaughter.

    That left the door open for Snohomish County deputy prosecutor Mara Rozzano to retry the case.


    You can't make this stuff up.
    I just went and copied those very same paragraphs to post before I saw that MitchellCT had already done it; they say it all.

    I wonder if his wife got the jewelry back, and I wonder if she sold it all to pay for her husbands defense. If not, I wonder if she'd trade that jewelry for he husband freedom if given the chance.
    "Just blame Sixto"

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by SIXTO View Post
    I wonder if his wife got the jewelry back, and I wonder if she sold it all to pay for her husbands defense. If not, I wonder if she'd trade that jewelry for he husband freedom if given the chance.
    She'll probably just find a new husband.

    Okay, that was cold.

    And he was more than stupid.
    -Bark'n
    Semper Fi


    "The gun is the great equalizer... For it is the gun, that allows the meek to repel the monsters; Whom are bigger, stronger and without conscience, prey on those who without one, would surely perish."

  15. #15
    VIP Member Array MitchellCT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SIGguy229 View Post
    Thus, learning and training should be done with reputable instructors. Reading and learning from boards like this one are good if you're sharing experiences or lessons learned through training...but learning how to handle/draw firearms from a holster via YouTube are poor substitutes for hands-on quality training. Getting a legal opinion online and applying it to your daily routine is also a poor choice. While we can discuss laws from a layman's point of view, if you really need a legal opinion, spend the cash and consult with an attorney with the knowledge and experience of self-defense/castle doctrine laws in your state.
    You don't seem to understand...

    If people did that, they might have to internalize that:

    1) The law is not what they want it to be;

    2) They might have to admit their understanding is flawed/nonexistant;

    3) They will have to learn fundamentals of a subject they believe they understood correctly but infact did not;

    4) They will need to apply said fundamentals to situations they believed they had a clear understanding of and rethink what they believed was clearly understood.

    People want the easy fix, simple answers and catchy phrases.

    They don't want to work. If that's the case, I just don't have any sympathy.

    It's not out of people's reach. If you can't afford a lawyer's consult, then they can read respected textbooks on the subjects, like "In the Gravest Extreme" by Ayoob, as well as his other works.

    But - it is phycologically uncomfortable to realize "I know I don't know." and most people won't do it.
    Stubborn and DefConGun like this.

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