Police -- acting under a state law that allows emergency, temporary psychiatric com.. - Page 4

Police -- acting under a state law that allows emergency, temporary psychiatric com..

This is a discussion on Police -- acting under a state law that allows emergency, temporary psychiatric com.. within the In the News: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly forums, part of the The Back Porch category; Originally Posted by barstoolguru It is not normal for someone to post "I am going to sever heads" And yet, you just did... Originally Posted ...

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  1. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by barstoolguru View Post
    It is not normal for someone to post "I am going to sever heads"
    And yet, you just did...

    Quote Originally Posted by barstoolguru View Post
    I just got back from the VA hospital and one of the first questions the nurse asked me did I feel depressed or wanted to kill myself or others. They are screening vets heavily for any sign of depression. I wasn't rude but I told her that I had a CHL and I was in no way feeling any of that and if she asked me continued with any form of that kind of questioning I was walking out. Thatís all I need is for someone to write in my medical file that I am depressed and then have to use my gun in a self-defense situation. Great way to lose a court case
    And now the note in your file at the VA says "pt admits to carrying weapons and was combative with staff during appt." That ought to serve you well...
    It's the Land of Opportunity, not the Land of Entitlements - Vote America!!!

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  2. #47
    VIP Member Array mcp1810's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eagleks View Post
    I think it continues to show Homeland's continued paranoia about military vets ......... but, there have been no vets out committing any mass shootings.... it's typically the nerdy bit psycho loner college or younger males who are. Examples : Aurora, Virg Tech, Gifford shooting, Columbine, etc.
    But if we look back and broaden our scope to include assassinations and bombings......... Lee Harvey Oswald- USMC, Charles Whitman-USMC, James Earl Ray- U.S. Army, Timothy McVeigh- U.S. Army, Ft Hood- Nidal Hassan active duty U.S. Army, the Sikh temple shooting- I forget his name but U.S. Army veteran.
    Some young nerdy psycho loners do happen to be vets. And they are young nerdy psycho loners that could be expected to have a passing familiarity with weapons and marksmanship.
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  3. #48
    VIP Member Array Crowman's Avatar
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    Memo to Ted Nugent: Stay out of Virginia.....
    "One of the greatest delusions in the world is the hope that the evils in this world are to be cured by legislation."
    --Thomas B. Reed, American Attorney

    Second Amendment -- Established December 15, 1791 and slowly eroded ever since What happened to "..... shall not be infringed."

  4. #49
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    The Texas tower shooter, Charles Whitman, had a form of brain cancer that may have caused him to go wacko.

  5. #50
    Senior Member Array CanuckQue's Avatar
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    Yep, it sucks. All the 'normal' solutions we have for preventing violent crime (or, at least the tactics we use) don't really work with the mentally ill. Each incident is a tragedy, because there's no one really to blame. Until a specific disease can be detected and treated properly, it's going to crop up from time to time and cause suffering amongst all those near the poor person.
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    spend more fighting Ebola than on Thanksgiving dinner. Be grateful it's being fought there, so we don't have to fight it here.

    As well, there are millions in potential patents possible for those with a tool shed, ideas, or creative loved ones to tell.. (and gumption) It's an untapped technology.


  6. #51
    Distinguished Member Array onacoma's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mlr1m View Post
    Not saying if they should or shouldn't be monitoring the web. I will say that there is nothing in the Constitution to prevent them form doing it.

    Michael
    I beleive that is covered in the 4th & 5th amendment!


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  7. #52
    VIP Member Array mcp1810's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by onacoma View Post
    I beleive that is covered in the 4th & 5th amendment!
    Public internet postings have no more expectation of privacy than posting your thoughts on a billboard next to the interstate. (4th Amend) Your willful posting of them is not being compelled. (5th A) Anything we post here or on a public facebook or myspace or whatever page are fair game. Private e-mail is a different animal though. That is as long as you are doing it from home. The courts have held that anything you do on an employers equipment (computer/phone etc.) is theirs and they can record, read, whatever without having to get a warrant.
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  8. #53
    Distinguished Member Array onacoma's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mcp1810 View Post
    Public internet postings have no more expectation of privacy than posting your thoughts on a billboard next to the interstate. (4th Amend) Your willful posting of them is not being compelled. (5th A) Anything we post here or on a public facebook or myspace or whatever page are fair game. Private e-mail is a different animal though. That is as long as you are doing it from home. The courts have held that anything you do on an employers equipment (computer/phone etc.) is theirs and they can record, read, whatever without having to get a warrant.
    Facebook is not a public forum (unlike this site which is public) if you need a pasword and/or an invitation to get into someones private accounts and postings, and if that is the case is it a private conversation between friends? Again, if he published his comments so that anyone on FaceBook could see his comments then you're correct.

    Again we're on a public forum which can be viewed without logging on so nothing on this site can be constured to be private except a PM between members and that is open for discussion as the site has "Rules".

    That why I refuse and don't have a FaceBook account as I'm saving my legal dollars just in case I need them for a defense of a self-defense case!


    In my many years I have come to a conclusion that one useless man is a shame, two is a law firm and three or more is a congress. -- John Adams

    If you think health care is expensive now, wait until you see what it costs when it's free! -- P.J. O'Rourke

  9. #54
    VIP Member Array mcp1810's Avatar
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    I deleted my facebook account many months ago. Depending on ones settings it is possible for anyone who has an account (many police and government agencies and companies have accounts) to see what you post. Unless you set your privacy settings to the maximum your posts are as private as a message on the scoreboard at a ball game. Only people who are in the stadium get to see it, but it is not close to being "private".
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  10. #55
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    It is interesting how many time in the last year or so FB has come up as being a source of problems for people. It is also interesting how (according to what I've read, possibly on this site) not having an FB account is considered to be one of the warning signs for being a potential terrorist, as is having (or expressing) Libertarian views. In other words, you are expected to line up like a good sheep, be counted, and buy into the great distraction.

    More than once, in terms of communication, both public and private, I've held my tongue over the concern of "if this were to be intercepted" and thinking of the concept of "anything you say, can and will be used against you". The thought police have become very real and it is becoming important to wear a proverbial blank expression.

  11. #56
    VIP Member Array mcp1810's Avatar
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    For me the Facebook thing its all about the money. They sell you and your likes etc. I am not product. If they want to sell me they need to cut me in for a piece of the action.
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  12. #57
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    I have said it before and I will say it again. Laws are not meant to prevent crime, but punish it once it has happened. This minority report crap has got to stop. You cannot punish someone for their thoughts, only their actions and anyone advocating for the contrary is to be blunt...a moron.

  13. #58
    Distinguished Member Array BigStick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CanuckQue View Post
    Yep, it sucks. All the 'normal' solutions we have for preventing violent crime (or, at least the tactics we use) don't really work with the mentally ill. Each incident is a tragedy, because there's no one really to blame. Until a specific disease can be detected and treated properly, it's going to crop up from time to time and cause suffering amongst all those near the poor person.
    I think I understand what you are trying to say here, but even the mentally ill are responsible for their actions. You can not shift the blame away from the individual performing the actions. Once you start down that road, you lose all accountability for actions. He was a good boy, but you can't blame him for lashing out because his parents neglected him...

    Yes, mental illness is a real thing and sometimes the result of physical or chemical issues in the brain, but the individuals must still be held accountable.
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    Walk softly ...

  14. #59
    Senior Member Array CanuckQue's Avatar
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    Schizophrenia, autism, and dementia are not caused by 'parental neglect'! They're caused by God-knows-what, because the research into them is severely underfunded compared to how much pain they cause. Punishing a schizophrenic, an autistic, or the demented doesn't do anything but cause additional pain. There's limited behaviour modification, there's no individual deterrence, there's no group deterrence.

    My posts were referring to mental illnesses that're of the disease variety, the ones with charitable societies to which you can cut checks so they'll fund more scientific research. *Those* are the conditions which hiccup the majority of theoretical thinking on gun owner's rights and rights regarding non-interference from the government. I've worked decently hard on this problem, and the only real solutions I can think of require the ability to fairly diagnose and the ability to properly treat. And, as much as I like my society, we're nowhere near at a competence level I am comfortable with.

    *edit: and, that bolded bit you quoted is a sentence fragment, so I should clarify. What I mean is that "there's no one to blame (for the onset of the mental deficiency, that destabilized the thinking to the point where the person's actions were not reasonable)."
    spend more fighting Ebola than on Thanksgiving dinner. Be grateful it's being fought there, so we don't have to fight it here.

    As well, there are millions in potential patents possible for those with a tool shed, ideas, or creative loved ones to tell.. (and gumption) It's an untapped technology.


  15. #60
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    This is really not uncommon. The two states I'm most familiar with both have a mechanism to force a person to get a mental evaluation if they are a threat, or danger to others or to themself. This is what happens when you talk of suicide, or harming someone. It can also happen if it appears that an adult person appears to be incapable of taking care of themself.

    While on patrol I've done it a thousand times.... But then that was NYC where most people ARE crazy.

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