Senate bill rewrite lets feds read your e-mail without warrants

This is a discussion on Senate bill rewrite lets feds read your e-mail without warrants within the In the News: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly forums, part of the The Back Porch category; Looks like Big Brother thought control is at work, our conversations are now an open book! Even your PMs are open for review! So the ...

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Thread: Senate bill rewrite lets feds read your e-mail without warrants

  1. #1
    Distinguished Member Array onacoma's Avatar
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    Senate bill rewrite lets feds read your e-mail without warrants

    Looks like Big Brother thought control is at work, our conversations are now an open book! Even your PMs are open for review! So the PC police are after you!

    Senate bill rewrite lets feds read your e-mail without warrants | Politics and Law - CNET News




    I could be the first one arrested!


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    Distinguished Member Array noway2's Avatar
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    Senate bill rewrite lets feds read your e-mail without warrants

    0) I don't put anything in an email or a forum, etc that I wouldn't want to say publicly.

    1) I don't use my ISP's email, nor do I use gmail, etc, nor do I relay my email through them. Instead I run my own email server, physically in my own home. This means that unless they get access to my personal property there is nothing for them to obtain.

    2) If I want to email privately, I use GPG encryption on it. Problem solved.

    3) If I don't want to leave a traffic trail, I use Tor.

    4) I run a Tor relay so my Tor traffic is indistinguishable from the traffic I relay, nor can Tor traffic be correlated with my comings and goings.

    5) For the extra paranoid, use a proxy service in a foreign country as your Internet access point.

    6) Sensitive data on my computers is encrypted with Truecrypt.

    The only agency that may have the capability to break the current encryption standards is the NSA. It is not known if they can or not, and they aren't saying one way or the other.

    Sent via that phone app
    blitzburgh and Doghandler like this.

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    Ex Member Array Piratesailor's Avatar
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    A great example of our eroding rights.

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    This is what happens when people in power get to stay in power.
    lchamp likes this.
    Retired USAF E-8. Avatar is OldVet from days long gone. Oh, to be young again.
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    Senior Member Array kb2wji's Avatar
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    I may not like it, but i've always treated email and internet postings as public. I dont have any expectation of privacy when I send something into cyber-space. Govt or not, there are always plenty of people who can access it and/or read it.

    The public nature of a public post (weird, huh?) makes me shake my head when I see these threads about news articles. Such as "GOOD: so and so shot so and so". I dont care how bad the bad guy was. Saying "good" about a shooting of any nature will come back to bite you in the behind if you ever need to use your weapon in self defense. Just sayin.
    AZJD1968 likes this.

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    The slide toward obtaining information without warrants, but merely with civil subpoenas issued
    without judicial oversight began after the big event of our first decade of the twenty first century.
    It is going to be hard to put the genie back in the jar.

    Surely there are enterprising programers and net gurus who can and will solve the problem.
    There's big bucks to be made doing it. I'm rather astounded that privacy protections haven't long ago been
    built into word processors and email systems. You'd think the large corporations would insist on such to protect
    trade secrets, and the financial institutions would insist on it to protect accounts, and even the government
    would insist on it to protect itself. There's something weird almost about a CIA director not knowing how
    to protect his email communications; not having the tools to do so. Not good.
    If the Union is once severed, the line of separation will grow wider and wider, and the controversies which are now debated and settled in the halls of legislation will then be tried in fields of battle and determined by the sword.
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    Senior Member Array mulle46's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by noway2 View Post
    0) I don't put anything in an email or a forum, etc that I wouldn't want to say publicly.

    1) I don't use my ISP's email, nor do I use gmail, etc, nor do I relay my email through them. Instead I run my own email server, physically in my own home. This means that unless they get access to my personal property there is nothing for them to obtain.

    2) If I want to email privately, I use GPG encryption on it. Problem solved.

    3) If I don't want to leave a traffic trail, I use Tor.

    4) I run a Tor relay so my Tor traffic is indistinguishable from the traffic I relay, nor can Tor traffic be correlated with my comings and goings.

    5) For the extra paranoid, use a proxy service in a foreign country as your Internet access point.

    6) Sensitive data on my computers is encrypted with Truecrypt.

    The only agency that may have the capability to break the current encryption standards is the NSA. It is not known if they can or not, and they aren't saying one way or the other.

    Sent via that phone app
    i seriously doubt there are publicly available encryption standards that the NSA can't break. I always act as if anything I do on the net, can be read by anyone at anytime.
    You gain strength, courage, and confidence by every experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face. You are able to say to yourself, "I have lived through this horror. I can take the next thing that comes along." . . . You must do the thing you think you cannot do. Eleanor Roosevelt

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    Senior Member Array cn262's Avatar
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    I agree with kb2wj1 - anything on the internet is basically public information. IP addresses can be traced back, many websites maintain history (not to mention the cache on your own computer), and public email sites (gmail and others) do not provide any real privacy. Your best bet (IMO) for email privacy is to maintain your own email server, and even that only protects one end. So, your best bet is to assume that someone is watching and act accordingly.

    For me personally, all the Feds would see are lame jokes from my father-in-law and a lot of email from cool stores. Pretty boring stuff...

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    Senior Member Array Cold Shot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by noway2 View Post
    0) I don't put anything in an email or a forum, etc that I wouldn't want to say publicly.

    1) I don't use my ISP's email, nor do I use gmail, etc, nor do I relay my email through them. Instead I run my own email server, physically in my own home. This means that unless they get access to my personal property there is nothing for them to obtain.

    2) If I want to email privately, I use GPG encryption on it. Problem solved.

    3) If I don't want to leave a traffic trail, I use Tor.

    4) I run a Tor relay so my Tor traffic is indistinguishable from the traffic I relay, nor can Tor traffic be correlated with my comings and goings.

    5) For the extra paranoid, use a proxy service in a foreign country as your Internet access point.

    6) Sensitive data on my computers is encrypted with Truecrypt.

    The only agency that may have the capability to break the current encryption standards is the NSA. It is not known if they can or not, and they aren't saying one way or the other.

    Sent via that phone app
    that's pretty hardcore

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    Slightly OT but relevant, why in the world do communications companies keep logs
    and keep copies of emails, tweats, voice mails, text message content?

    It has to cost money to do so, in the form of memory and employees to administer things.
    Wouldn't it be better for them, and almost all of us,
    if these things were kept only until they were downloaded??

    What benefit does an ISP get from retaining these things after
    the recipient has deleted the item from his in-box? Why does ATT (for example, retain deleted SMS
    messages? I don't get it.

    I can see keeping logs for a short period, a few days or a few weeks, for real emergency LEO needs. But
    after that, I don't get it.
    If the Union is once severed, the line of separation will grow wider and wider, and the controversies which are now debated and settled in the halls of legislation will then be tried in fields of battle and determined by the sword.
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    Distinguished Member Array onacoma's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hopyard View Post
    Slightly OT but relevant, why in the world do communications companies keep logs
    and keep copies of emails, tweats, voice mails, text message content?

    It has to cost money to do so, in the form of memory and employees to administer things.
    Wouldn't it be better for them, and almost all of us,
    if these things were kept only until they were downloaded??

    What benefit does an ISP get from retaining these things after
    the recipient has deleted the item from his in-box? Why does ATT (for example, retain deleted SMS
    messages? I don't get it.

    I can see keeping logs for a short period, a few days or a few weeks, for real emergency LEO needs. But
    after that, I don't get it.
    If you have a gMail account or everytime you "Google" they have a copy on file! Most of the agreements state once you access the account and accept their terms it now belongs to them!


    In my many years I have come to a conclusion that one useless man is a shame, two is a law firm and three or more is a congress. -- John Adams

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    Quote Originally Posted by onacoma View Post
    If you have a gMail account or everytime you "Google" they have a copy on file! Most of the agreements state once you access the account and accept their terms it now belongs to them!
    Yes, I understand that, but why? I can find crap I posted in the early 1990s on Usenet groups; why is
    someone going to the expense of keeping it?

    Why are the phone companies spending money to keep SMS texts?

    I don't get it.

    Do we really need a running record of every piece of drivel ever posted anywhere in the world?

    Again, I don't get it.

    WHY? And why isn't it different? Why are there no options?

    The present approach is
    no good for anyone, including government--- notwithstanding that they might once in a rare instant
    catch someone who needs catching.
    If the Union is once severed, the line of separation will grow wider and wider, and the controversies which are now debated and settled in the halls of legislation will then be tried in fields of battle and determined by the sword.
    Andrew Jackson

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    Quote Originally Posted by OldVet View Post
    This is what happens when people in power get to stay in power.
    ...and it's not going to get any better.

    I prefer the 'special rule' that politicians serve only two terms, one in office and one in jail.

    In 2010, about fifteen states already did this.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of...cted_of_crimes
    The last Blood Moon Tetrad for this millennium starts in April 2014 and ends in September 2015...according to NASA.

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    Distinguished Member Array Doghandler's Avatar
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    Re: Senate bill rewrite lets feds read your e-mail without warrants

    Quote Originally Posted by mulle46 View Post
    i seriously doubt there are publicly available encryption standards that the NSA can't break. I always act as if anything I do on the net, can be read by anyone at anytime.
    They most likely can not break GPG RSA with current computing power in any time not measured in years - but, of course, computing power increases quickly and we will see quantum computers in 20 years, probably less.

    No matter. They can get you to divulge your password with some hmmmm, hmmm, gentle persuasion.
    There is a solution but we are not Jedi... not yet.
    Doghandler

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    I'm amused that communication by land-line telephone used to be about the least secure means of communication is now so old-fashioned it's seemingly among the most secure! No digital records of content routinely kept... someone has to be actively 'listening' in order to capture the conversation.
    Smitty
    NRA Endowment Member

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