Man Kills Agressive Pit Bull - Boise, ID

This is a discussion on Man Kills Agressive Pit Bull - Boise, ID within the In the News: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly forums, part of the The Back Porch category; Originally Posted by Rustynuts The operative word for dogs is "MOST". NO gun will jump up and shoot someone on it's own. And nither will ...

Page 3 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast
Results 31 to 45 of 77

Thread: Man Kills Agressive Pit Bull - Boise, ID

  1. #31
    Member Array Carpet475's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Pleasant Grove, Utah
    Posts
    46
    Quote Originally Posted by Rustynuts View Post
    The operative word for dogs is "MOST". NO gun will jump up and shoot someone on it's own.
    And nither will a porperly trained and socialized dog.
    Again people are the problem in ALL bad dog cases.

    If a gun can't jump up and shoot someone, why is that people are afraid of the gun?
    Last edited by Carpet475; June 5th, 2008 at 10:22 PM. Reason: to add more

  2. Remove Ads

  3. #32
    Restricted Member Array SelfDefense's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Tucson
    Posts
    2,736
    Every month or so we have a thread debating pit bulls. Each and every time it is because a pit bull has killed or maimed someone. I do understand those who love a particular breed. I love beagles. But I have yet to see a thread concerning a beagle that has killed a child.

    Pit bulls were specifically bred to fight to the death. That is their inbred temperament. Yes, they can be trained to suppress their natural tendencies but not reliably enough to protect the communitiy. Pit bulls should be eradicated.

    For those who say they are good with children, they are only good with children they protect. Every other child is in grave danger in the presence of a pit bull. The best dog owner in the world has no control over a determined pit bull. And any owner that thinks differently is simply naive or overly emotional over the breed. I support every law to curb the violence of pit bulls. and every owner should be fully liable for any damage the dog causes just as if the owner did it. Pit bull kills child: premeditated murder sentence for the owner.

    Pointing to another breed that occasionally has behavior problems does not justify the horrendous damage done by pit bulls.

  4. #33
    Distinguished Member Array morintp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    1,233
    I used to feel that way too SD, but then I got to know a couple of pitbulls that didn't have the temperment that I thought all pitbulls had. One was raised as a pet by a friend. It was a sweet, good natured dog to everyone.

    The other dog was rescued from a dog fighting ring. She was going to be killed because she refused to fight. She scared the crap out of me once when she snuck away while her owner was working outside and came wandering into my house when I was moving a couch in. I knew her story, but this was a pitbull, right? I let her out and she followed me back to her house. I had my hand up, snapping my fingers to get her to follow me and she jumped up at my hand only to rub her head on it. She wanted to be pet, just like any other dog.

    We lived in a neighborhood with a lot of kids and dogs and this pitbull never even barked or growled once at anyone or anything. She was the one that finally made be a believer that not all pitbulls are vicious and it has to be bred and taught to them. Breeding alone won't do it, and neither will just teaching. Yes, some pitbulls are bred for fighting, but not all of them. Also, not all of them are raised for fighting. Some of them, like this one are some of the gentlest dogs you've ever seen. They are like any other breed, and if people stopped trying to breed aggressiveness into them, they would eventually become as accepted as other dogs.

  5. #34
    Member Array Texian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    West Texas
    Posts
    68
    This new law in Texas could help some. I pray that it does. The other two dogs have now been destroyed.

    Two more pit bulls ordered destroyed : Big Country : Abilene Reporter-News

    By Kristi Hsu (Contact)
    Wednesday, June 4, 2008

    The two remaining dogs belonging to owners charged with the dog-mauling death of a 7-year-old Breckenridge boy were ordered to be destroyed Wednesday, according to the Justice of the Peace office in Stephens County.

    Some of the four dogs belonging to Jack Smith, 45, and Crystal Watson, 27, reportedly attacked Tanner Monk, 7, on May 18 and he was found dead on County Road 415 in Stephens County, about 100 yards west of his family's house and about 50 to 70 yards west of the home where the dogs were kept.

    Two of the dogs, both pit bulls, were shot on site after they became aggressive toward authorities at scene. Smith and Watson were arrested and charged with a second degree felony in connection with the death.

    Bail was set at $250,000 for each, and both are still in custody.

    The case is the first time a dog attack death has occurred since a stiff law went into effect in September. Under Lillian's Law, a dog attack that results in a death is a felony offense punishable by 20 years in prison and a maximum $10,000 fine.

    Rep. Dan Gattis, R-Georgetown, sponsored the bill after Lillian Stiles, 76, was killed by a pack of dogs in 2005.

    The bill was intended to make dog owners take more responsibility for their pets, said Marilyn Stiles Shoemaker, Lillian Stiles' daughter.

    The two remaining dogs allegedly belonging to Smith and Watson are to be destroyed, although there is a 10-day appeal period. Stephens County Sheriff Jim Reeves previously said he believed the two dogs played a role in Monk's death.

    Both dogs are in custody at the Breckenridge City Animal shelter.
    "The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him." G.K. Chesterton

  6. #35
    Restricted Member Array SelfDefense's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Tucson
    Posts
    2,736
    Quote Originally Posted by morintp View Post
    I used to feel that way too SD, but then I got to know a couple of pitbulls that didn't have the temperment that I thought all pitbulls had. One was raised as a pet by a friend. It was a sweet, good natured dog to everyone.

    The other dog was rescued from a dog fighting ring. She was going to be killed because she refused to fight. She scared the crap out of me once when she snuck away while her owner was working outside and came wandering into my house when I was moving a couch in. I knew her story, but this was a pitbull, right? I let her out and she followed me back to her house. I had my hand up, snapping my fingers to get her to follow me and she jumped up at my hand only to rub her head on it. She wanted to be pet, just like any other dog.

    We lived in a neighborhood with a lot of kids and dogs and this pitbull never even barked or growled once at anyone or anything. She was the one that finally made be a believer that not all pitbulls are vicious and it has to be bred and taught to them. Breeding alone won't do it, and neither will just teaching. Yes, some pitbulls are bred for fighting, but not all of them. Also, not all of them are raised for fighting. Some of them, like this one are some of the gentlest dogs you've ever seen. They are like any other breed, and if people stopped trying to breed aggressiveness into them, they would eventually become as accepted as other dogs.
    I partly agree with this. There are particular pit bulls that are simply wonderful dogs. But it isn't that some pit bulls are specifically bred for fighting, the breed was created for that specific purpose. Some don't fit the mold. But that does not mitigate the potential harm from a randomly selcted pit bull. And you never really know if any particular pit bull will not harm a child. As others have noted, most lethal pit bull attacks are the first ever for that particular individual.

    Dogs don't have to be taught to be vicious. Some breeds are vicious by nature. Pit bulls are one such breed. They can be trained [hopefully] not to attack on a whim. But at what cost? There are many great breeds of dog that will not need special training that is unproven to be completely effective at curbing the natural violence of pit bulls. We are not taking about extinction of a species, only eradication of a poor choice of breeding that has caused irreparable harm to innocent people.

    As long as there are pit bulls there will be these awful stories of pit bull attacks. And every once in a while a great story that someone stopped the threat before it harmed a chid.

  7. #36
    Member Array Carpet475's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Pleasant Grove, Utah
    Posts
    46
    I would like to know more about where these Pits where bred and raised, because it seems to me that the closer you get to highly populated areas the more the bad Pits show up.


    Where I live I can't recall if there has ever been a death by Pit bull.
    It seams to reaffirm my thinking that these dogs come from areas where there is a market for dog fighting.

    As a dog breeder I'm often sent stuff in my email, this is one I received and think most people should see if they think dog fighting is rare.

  8. #37
    Member Array Carpet475's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Pleasant Grove, Utah
    Posts
    46
    Quote Originally Posted by SelfDefense View Post
    I partly agree with this. There are particular pit bulls that are simply wonderful dogs. But it isn't that some pit bulls are specifically bred for fighting, the breed was created for that specific purpose. Some don't fit the mold. But that does not mitigate the potential harm from a randomly selcted pit bull. And you never really know if any particular pit bull will not harm a child. As others have noted, most lethal pit bull attacks are the first ever for that particular individual.

    Dogs don't have to be taught to be vicious. Some breeds are vicious by nature. Pit bulls are one such breed. They can be trained [hopefully] not to attack on a whim. But at what cost? There are many great breeds of dog that will not need special training that is unproven to be completely effective at curbing the natural violence of pit bulls. We are not taking about extinction of a species, only eradication of a poor choice of breeding that has caused irreparable harm to innocent people.

    As long as there are pit bulls there will be these awful stories of pit bull attacks. And every once in a while a great story that someone stopped the threat before it harmed a chid.
    The English bulldog WAS one of those breeds bred for fighting in the 1800's to early 1900's, now look at them. With selective breeding it has become one of the most docile breeds out there. The same could be said of the Pit in years to come if given the chance.

    So do you part and remove any dog that is aggressive from the gene pool.

  9. #38
    Member Array 1911packer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    420
    Quote Originally Posted by Carpet475 View Post
    I would like to know more about where these Pits where bred and raised, because it seems to me that the closer you get to highly populated areas the more the bad Pits show up.
    You may be right about that. I live near a city that has an NFL team whose previous quarterback was REALLY into dog fighting (I won't mention the city.) In certain areas of town, it is not uncommon to see people walking pit bulls that have scars on their faces and exhibit a bad disposition.

    We occasionally have news reports of people being attacked by pit bulls. Given my experiences, it is easy for me to draw the conclusion that all pit bulls are dangerous.

    Then again, I will be watching a dog show on TV and see Staffordshire Terriers that seem quite well mannered. Is it the breeding or the training?

  10. #39
    Member Array Carpet475's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Pleasant Grove, Utah
    Posts
    46
    Quote Originally Posted by 1911packer View Post
    You may be right about that. I live near a city that has an NFL team whose previous quarterback was REALLY into dog fighting (I won't mention the city.) In certain areas of town, it is not uncommon to see people walking pit bulls that have scars on their faces and exhibit a bad disposition.

    We occasionally have news reports of people being attacked by pit bulls. Given my experiences, it is easy for me to draw the conclusion that all pit bulls are dangerous.

    Then again, I will be watching a dog show on TV and see Staffordshire Terriers that seem quite well mannered. Is it the breeding or the training?
    Training 90% of the time. As with people you'll get bad unstable individuals.

    I have found smaller dogs to be more prone to biting as they tend to be more high strung, and the owners think that "it just a small dog" it doesn't need to be trained and as such they tend to be allowed to roam free more often then other dogs. Granted smaller dog usually stay closer to home then a large dog will.

  11. #40
    Member Array carbon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    dayton
    Posts
    39
    ATTS - American Temperament test Society, Inc. - Home
    pitt bulls score the same as boxers84.3%, higher than GSD 83.5%, Collies 79.4%, Beagels 80.3%, andScotties 63.6%.
    Bull Terriers related to APBT scored an 88.8% higher than anything listed above. The same story with american bull dogs who scored 84.1% also related to the APBT.
    And, the "pitt bulls" that you see on the news fighting and attacking people are not pitt bulls at all they are mutts muttants of the breed called american bullies.

  12. #41
    Senior Member Array Holdcard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Phoenix, Az.
    Posts
    531
    I don't know everything there is to know about dogs or specifically pit bulls. One thing I do know is that the owner is responsible for their dog.

    We had a pit bull mix, actually Akita, Pit Bull, Boxer, and German Shepard. Although he could have been considered aggressive (by breed), he was one of the best dogs I ever had.

    Many dogs will chase and scare kids, their instinct makes them want to chase anything that moves. Kids get scared of an animal and they run, the dog instinctively chases them. Some dogs just chase, but the instinct of some dogs is to attack what they chase.

    So as a responsible owner I always had my dog fenced or leashed. Around my grand daughters he was fine, but we never let the neighbor kids pet him without one of us having a hand on his collar. We knew his instinct and accommodated for it. We were also pretty strict with the neighbor kids too. We didn't let them pet him unless they were calm.

    If a dog is bred and trained specifically for fighting and you rescue it you need to be responsible for it and make accommodations for it's training and instinct.

    The responsibility rests on the owners not the breed. If you get a dog that in bred for running like a cattle dog of some sort you need to make sure the dog gets to run. If you get a dog that is bred for its aggressive nature, you need to make sure don't put the animal in a position to hurt anyone.

    I've never owned a purebred pit, but have had friends that did. Knowing the breed you own and making the necessary accommodations for that specific breed makes all the difference in the world. I have no doubt that had we not been responsible for our dog he most probably would have hurt someone. That doesn't make him a bad dog, it would have mad us irresponsible owners.

    For what it's worth,

    Holdcard
    If You Want To POPULATE Heaven
    You Have To PLUNDER Hell!!

    4th Man Ministries

  13. #42
    Member Array carbon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    dayton
    Posts
    39

    Quote Originally Posted by Holdcard View Post
    I don't know everything there is to know about dogs or specifically pit bulls. One thing I do know is that the owner is responsible for their dog.

    We had a pit bull mix, actually Akita, Pit Bull, Boxer, and German Shepard. Although he could have been considered aggressive (by breed), he was one of the best dogs I ever had.

    Many dogs will chase and scare kids, their instinct makes them want to chase anything that moves. Kids get scared of an animal and they run, the dog instinctively chases them. Some dogs just chase, but the instinct of some dogs is to attack what they chase.

    So as a responsible owner I always had my dog fenced or leashed. Around my grand daughters he was fine, but we never let the neighbor kids pet him without one of us having a hand on his collar. We knew his instinct and accommodated for it. We were also pretty strict with the neighbor kids too. We didn't let them pet him unless they were calm.

    If a dog is bred and trained specifically for fighting and you rescue it you need to be responsible for it and make accommodations for it's training and instinct.

    The responsibility rests on the owners not the breed. If you get a dog that in bred for running like a cattle dog of some sort you need to make sure the dog gets to run. If you get a dog that is bred for its aggressive nature, you need to make sure don't put the animal in a position to hurt anyone.

    I've never owned a purebred pit, but have had friends that did. Knowing the breed you own and making the necessary accommodations for that specific breed makes all the difference in the world. I have no doubt that had we not been responsible for our dog he most probably would have hurt someone. That doesn't make him a bad dog, it would have mad us irresponsible owners.

    For what it's worth,

    Holdcard

  14. #43
    OD*
    OD* is offline
    Moderator
    Array OD*'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Coopersville
    Posts
    10,612
    Quote Originally Posted by carbon View Post
    ATTS - American Temperament test Society, Inc. - Home
    pitt bulls score the same as boxers84.3%, higher than GSD 83.5%, Collies 79.4%, Beagels 80.3%, andScotties 63.6%.
    Bull Terriers related to APBT scored an 88.8% higher than anything listed above. The same story with american bull dogs who scored 84.1% also related to the APBT.
    And, the "pitt bulls" that you see on the news fighting and attacking people are not pitt bulls at all they are mutts muttants of the breed called american bullies.
    How dare you confuse the issue with facts!!



    "The pistol, learn it well, carry it always ..." ~ Jeff Cooper

    "Diligentia Vis Celeritas"

    "There is very little new, and the forgotten is constantly being rediscovered."
    ~ Tiger McKee

  15. #44
    VIP Member Array Kerbouchard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    2,894
    Quote Originally Posted by carbon View Post
    ATTS - American Temperament test Society, Inc. - Home
    pitt bulls score the same as boxers84.3%, higher than GSD 83.5%, Collies 79.4%, Beagels 80.3%, andScotties 63.6%.
    Bull Terriers related to APBT scored an 88.8% higher than anything listed above. The same story with american bull dogs who scored 84.1% also related to the APBT.
    And, the "pitt bulls" that you see on the news fighting and attacking people are not pitt bulls at all they are mutts muttants of the breed called american bullies.
    Those are bogus statistics and completely irrelevant.

    I won't argue the 'temperament' score. I'll admit that most poodles are more prone to bite than a Pit-bull or Rottweiler. I'll even admit that most dog bites are Black Labs.

    But, I will say that out of severe or fatal dog bites, the percentage of Rott's and Pit-bull breeds are not even close to proportionate.

    If we can say that 100 times as many poodle attacks happen as pit-bull attacks, than there should be 100 times more deaths by poodle than by pit-bull, right? Of course not. That is why your 'temperament statistics' do nothing to convince me that a pit-bull has any business being a family pet.

    I own a ball python, which most people are afraid of...but I would never own a reticulated python. For the same reasoning I don't want me, or my family around any type of pitbull or rottweiler.

    Animals are animals. There is no getting around it. If an animal resorts back to it's 'animal' ways, I want to make sure it can't eat me.
    There are two sides to every issue: one side is right and the other is wrong, but the middle is always evil.

    http://miscmusings.townhall.com/

    Who is John Galt?

  16. #45
    Member Array 1911packer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    420
    Quote Originally Posted by Carpet475 View Post
    I have found smaller dogs to be more prone to biting as they tend to be more high strung, and the owners think that "it just a small dog" it doesn't need to be trained and as such they tend to be allowed to roam free more often then other dogs. Granted smaller dog usually stay closer to home then a large dog will.
    My personal experiences tend to support that. I used to have a job where I went into peoples homes. When they answered the door, I asked if they had a dog, and please put it up.

    The worst ones were the little breeds that would bite and run. The medium to large breeds were either friendly or were ready for a fight to the finish. These owners would have the gall to say, "Oh, he doesn't bite." Some wouldn't, some would.

    You got a dog? Put it up or I'm not coming in.

    Any strange dog in my yard is treated with suspicion and caution. I had to go after two in my back yard a few months back that has cornered a cat. I had my 1911 in my hand and off safety when I went to investigate. They ran when I barked at them.

Page 3 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast

Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. New From Boise, Id.
    By Dutch1911 in forum New Members Introduce Yourself
    Replies: 37
    Last Post: January 21st, 2010, 07:57 AM
  2. Agressive street person last week
    By NCTom in forum Carry & Defensive Scenarios
    Replies: 33
    Last Post: April 25th, 2009, 04:14 AM
  3. Man Kills Agressive Bear In His Backyard - Henderson County, NC
    By CT-Mike in forum In the News: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: June 4th, 2008, 10:45 PM
  4. Boise
    By koolguynet in forum Off Topic & Humor Discussion
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: May 8th, 2007, 12:52 PM
  5. Hello from Boise ID
    By vburke in forum New Members Introduce Yourself
    Replies: 39
    Last Post: February 25th, 2007, 11:27 PM

Search tags for this page

are pit bulls legal in boise idaho
,
boise idaho - pit bull terrier law
,

boise idaho pitbull laws

,
boise idaho pitbull positive news
,
boise pit bull laws
,

boise pitbulls

,

dave davies boise

,
dave davies kills dog boise idaho
,
dave davies pitbull boise
,

dave davies, idaho

,
idaho man shoots pitbull
,
idaho pit bull laws
,
pit bull regulatins boise
,
pitbull law in boise idaho
,

pitbulls boise, id

Click on a term to search for related topics.