BAD... Deputy comes home to find wife murdered by burglar and kills him. - Page 2

BAD... Deputy comes home to find wife murdered by burglar and kills him.

This is a discussion on BAD... Deputy comes home to find wife murdered by burglar and kills him. within the In the News: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly forums, part of the The Back Porch category; cphilip. What you shared is a tragedy beyond reckoning. Wow. I'm really sorry to hear of it. Here's the latest buzz on the deputy's story. ...

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Thread: BAD... Deputy comes home to find wife murdered by burglar and kills him.

  1. #16
    Senior Member Array Moga's Avatar
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    cphilip. What you shared is a tragedy beyond reckoning. Wow. I'm really sorry to hear of it.

    Here's the latest buzz on the deputy's story.



    Deputy had been arrested for altercation with son

    By APRIL HUNT, LARRY CONLEY
    The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
    Published on: 06/11/08

    The DeKalb County sheriff's deputy who shot an intruder who he said shot his wife was arrested in November, 2006 for a domestic violence incident after an altercation with his teenage son, records show.

    Derrick Yancey, 46, was charged with simple battery and simple assault after an argument with his son over playing "offensive music," according to a police report. The teenager said Yancey hit him and threw his computer keyboard to the ground, according to the report.

    The charges against Yancey were later dropped, according to county records. His son said he did not wish to prosecute.

    On Monday, Yancey, 46, shot and killed a man inside his Stone Mountain home. He said the man, who has not been identified, shot his wife, 44-year-old Linda Yancey, who also died inside the home that the couple shared for a decade. Yancey was off-duty at the time.

    Both Yanceys worked for the DeKalb sheriff's office. Derrick Yancey is a 17-year-veteran deputy whose job was to transport inmates around the state. Linda Yancey had worked for the department for 13 years, first in the county court and most recently as intake officer in the juvenile court.

    Police are still trying to piece together what happened inside their brick two-story home. Yancey is the only witness to the shootings that prompted a 911 call to the upscale subdivision at about 1 p.m. Monday.

    DeKalb County police, who are investigating the incident, did not release details. Yancey said he did not know the man, who police had yet to identify Wednesday.

    "We are still unsure who the man was, how that man got into the house or why he was there," said Mekka Parish, spokeswoman for DeKalb police.

    Police are waiting for an autopsy to help reveal the identity of the man, identified only as a Hispanic male. A relative told police that the man might have been a day laborer, but police were unable to confirm that information, Parish said.

    Neighbors in the quiet subdivision said Yancey would hire workers to help with landscaping and plantings at his home. But he also took personal care of the lawn, which stands out even in a neighborhood of groomed lawns and sculpted plants.

    "His yard is always meticulous," said Rhonda Broughton, who lives down the block. "He cut his grass every two or three days. He had to, because it's that grass they use for golf courses."

    Yancey and the couples' two sons, ages 8 and 18, are staying with relatives. The younger son arrived home Monday from day camp to find investigators and media swarming the area, neighbors said.

    Yancey is on paid administration leave. The Sheriff's Office will conduct an internal investigation to make sure Yancey followed procedures when he fired his gun.



    Doesn't really mean much to me. There's not enough data there to draw any conclusions but it does help to put together a composite of who the deputy is.
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  2. #17
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    Or maybe the deputy offered Pedro a few bucks to off his wife and had all intentions of setting it up to look like he walked in on it.And then he killed pedro to make it all fit. Three can keep a secret,if two are . It sounds a little fishy to me. Hopefully it is what deputy has said.

  3. #18
    Senior Member Array Moga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1shot View Post
    Or maybe the deputy offered Pedro a few bucks to off his wife and had all intentions of setting it up to look like he walked in on it.And then he killed pedro to make it all fit. Three can keep a secret,if two are . It sounds a little fishy to me. Hopefully it is what deputy has said.
    Someone else on this thread hypothesized the same theory. I guess we'll see. Oh, BTW, welcome aboard.
    2nd Amendment: because personal violence never makes an appointment.
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  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moga View Post
    You know DPD is looking at the deputy as a suspect. Deputy comes home to find his lil lady in the sack with the yard help. Kills both people in a fit of rage, etc.

    I'm sure that as LE, he knows the other guys are only doing their jobs. But I'm not sure how well I would take being investigated for the murder of my wife if the circumstances were the same.

    I hope they close their investigation with all deliberate speed for the sake of the husband. God he must be wracked with guilt for leaving his wife home with that animal.
    One cop who lived right across my gramps friend came home to see his skank girl friend getting nailed by another guy (who was also a cop from the SAME department)... ALL 3 of them in this love triangle were cops... the guy unloaded his glock .40cal into them until it ran dry and his defence was mistaken identity of a man raping his woman.

    Quote Originally Posted by lance22 View Post
    Sickening story. A guy shows up at the door saying he'll do some yard work for a few bucks? So sad that we have to say "no" to everything these days.

    The husband is always a suspect so I take that with a grain of salt.
    Some contractors will actually get a or illegal alien (no background on WHO the person really is) to do things on the job... the junkies need their crack money and the illegals need to get payed under the table... the contractors take advantage of desperate people to make a buck and unsuspecting people (especially children) are right there for the taking... some people are actually naive enough to believe they are safer just because these people are getting payed anyways.

    There are cases of child molesters getting janitorial jobs at middle schools... that's like putting a fox in the hen house, the senses are being over whelmed.
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  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by cphilip View Post
    Oh yes... simply police doing their job.

    I was immediately a suspect when my first wife killed herself. How did I react? Well... I was in shock of course due to the unexpected nature of her actions, but to the police, it was simply assumed by me that they would want to be completely thorough and it didn't bother me at all their actions and questions. That was the least of my concerns. They swabbed me and questioned me and all that. I was, not really in any state of mind to do anything but be thinking about why she had done this and about my 10 year old Son. It never dawned on me to think of it as inappropriate or wrong for them to do so. Seem logical to me that they would want to "eliminate" any other possibility. She had used my gun of course. Because she didn't use or like guns. It turns out later she had attempted an overdose the night before and it failed, and she had fained being sick to me that morning in order to cover that up. Because she left no note handy it was not as easy for any of us to figure it out. Turns out she had mailed it to her Psyc the day before. She also had unplugged all the phones in case someone was to try and call her from there. And they did. But I had left the house to take my kid to Summer Day camp and didn't know this. I came back home later to discover her and couldn't figure out why all the phones were dead when I ran back to the house to call. I had to call 911 on a cell phone.

    She gave no warnings and made no threats or left any clues she was suicidal, in fact, had been deemed not suicidal by her Doctor. She lived a secret life very well within her own head. It wasn't until the stuff she sent her Doctor was read that we all realized how deeply troubled and disturbed she was. She was a master of disguise. And, in fact so clever at it that even a trained professional was fooled. One could say she was too smart for her own good.

    But having been a suspect for a time I had no problem with it at all. That was the least of my problems at the time. I would imagine this officer also thinks the same way. If he is innocent then he is not even thinking about that right now.
    I could imagine the same would be true is someone's mother, girl friend etc committed suicide too, all the people closest to them would be a suspect.

    Sorry to hear about your first wife... My step grandmother's niece has a history of mental problems, and she when she had been staying with them during her ordeal, she actually made mention of suicide to me, she claimed she joined the military because she was suicidal and felt her life had no value or meaning etc, that sort of thing, I had to personally tell my grand father to keep an eye on his firearms just in case because I felt she would be the type that may true to kill them self (and she has a 8 year old boy too, but is pretty much incapable of taking care of him.)
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  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by mcp1810 View Post
    Of course they are looking at him as a suspect. They would have to be brain dead not to.
    Obvious scenario with the history of domestics is he hired the day laborer to kill her and dispose of the body and then double crossed him to tie up the loose end.
    Just because the facts seem to fit the theory doesn't mean it really happened that way. The guy could be completely innocent.
    My first thought also.

    Quote Originally Posted by cphilip View Post
    Oh yes... simply police doing their job.

    I was immediately a suspect when my first wife killed herself. How did I react? Well... I was in shock of course due to the unexpected nature of her actions, but to the police, it was simply assumed by me that they would want to be completely thorough and it didn't bother me at all their actions and questions. That was the least of my concerns. They swabbed me and questioned me and all that. I was, not really in any state of mind to do anything but be thinking about why she had done this and about my 10 year old Son. It never dawned on me to think of it as inappropriate or wrong for them to do so. Seem logical to me that they would want to "eliminate" any other possibility. She had used my gun of course. Because she didn't use or like guns. It turns out later she had attempted an overdose the night before and it failed, and she had fained being sick to me that morning in order to cover that up. Because she left no note handy it was not as easy for any of us to figure it out. Turns out she had mailed it to her Psyc the day before. She also had unplugged all the phones in case someone was to try and call her from there. And they did. But I had left the house to take my kid to Summer Day camp and didn't know this. I came back home later to discover her and couldn't figure out why all the phones were dead when I ran back to the house to call. I had to call 911 on a cell phone.

    She gave no warnings and made no threats or left any clues she was suicidal, in fact, had been deemed not suicidal by her Doctor. She lived a secret life very well within her own head. It wasn't until the stuff she sent her Doctor was read that we all realized how deeply troubled and disturbed she was. She was a master of disguise. And, in fact so clever at it that even a trained professional was fooled. One could say she was too smart for her own good.

    But having been a suspect for a time I had no problem with it at all. That was the least of my problems at the time. I would imagine this officer also thinks the same way. If he is innocent then he is not even thinking about that right now.
    My sympathies, and thank you for sharing that.
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  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by TacticalCompact View Post
    So you are saying that he is not a possible suspect? Only that it is standard procedure? Do you mean to imply that simply because he is a LEO that the story must be true and he is innocent?

    Do you believe all LEO are perfect and would never do such a thing? Just curious :D
    Thats not what I said at all, you even had the quote of what I said in your post.

    It doesn't mean he is a suspect, nor does it mean that he is not. Its simply states that is standard procedure.
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  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by SIXTO View Post
    Thats not what I said at all, you even had the quote of what I said in your post.

    It doesn't mean he is a suspect, nor does it mean that he is not. Its simply states that is standard procedure.
    I think the part where you said "no" apparently in response to my assessment that the officer is a possible suspect, then offered your opinion of the situation is where I figured you were disagreeing with me.

    I said he was a "possible suspect." You said "no..."

    Surely I read to much into that. Sorry.

  9. #24
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    Keep the discussion civil or it will be closed. I don't want to clean up any more posts.
    eschew obfuscation

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  10. #25
    Senior Member Array Moga's Avatar
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    Here's the latest scoop on the investigation. It appears that the deputy didn't arrive home to find the robbery in progress, but instead was there the entire time. How did that detail become muddled, you ask? Atlanta Journal Constitution has the worst journalist personnel that I've ever seen. Their stories are consistently way off the mark, leading me to believe that their journalists aren't college educated or smoke entirely too much of the wacky tobaccky. The writers one way or the other seem to have spurned fact checking altogether.



    Deputy had hired man he shot as day laborer

    By APRIL HUNT, LARRY CONLEY
    The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
    Published on: 06/11/08

    The DeKalb County sheriff's deputy who told police he was forced to shoot an intruder who attacked his wife had brought the man into his home as a laborer, newly released records show.

    The shoot out - described by Derrick Yancey as the laborer shooting his wife, Linda, and Yancey shooting the laborer - erupted when the man tried to rob the couple, according to DeKalb police records.

    Yancey, 46, had picked up the man "to help him do some work around the house," the police says. "(He) said the male had tried to rob him and shot his wife. (He) said he then shot the male."

    Details of what Yancey said happened inside the Stone Mountain home Monday afternoon emerged as other records show that Yancey was arrested twice in 2006 on domestic violence charges for confrontations with his teenage son. Charges were dropped in both cases.

    After Monday's shootings, neighbors said Yancey previously had hired day laborers to help with landscaping at his home. Yancey told police he did not know the man he hired on Monday.

    He called 911 after the shootings and led an officer to the basement. The officer saw an Hispanic man lifeless on the floor, "with a silver revolver lying on his left side," according to the report. Linda Yancey was lying in an adjacent doorway.

    The officer spotted at least one silver shell casing on the floor, as well as a "large roll of bills, including $50 and $100 dollar bills," the report said.

    The shootings of Linda Yancey, 44, and the still-unidentified man are being investigated by DeKalb County police, who would not disclose specifics.

    "The detectives are not going into any details at this time," said department spokeswoman Mekka Parish. "It's all very fluid."

    Yancey has not been arrested or charged.

    Derrick and Linda Yancey both worked for the DeKalb sheriff's department -- Derrick, a 17-year veteran who transported inmates and Linda, who spent 13 years in the department most recently as intake officer in juvenile court.

    Neither the sheriff's office nor county police officials would comment on Yancey's arrests in April and November 2006, in separate incidents involving his son Karron, now 18.

    Police reports, which include some improperly redacted information, show that, in the April incident, Yancey told police that his son hit him in the face when he tried to take away the teen's cell phone, as punishment for downloading "dirty music" on the family computer.

    A relative who was at the home called police, saying Linda Yancey said her husband chased their son out of the home with his pistol and threatened to "blow her son (sic) head off." Linda Yancey later confirmed the threat but said her husband was not armed when he made it.

    Yancey was charged with making terroristic threats.

    In November, Yancey and his son had another blow up over music. Yancey said he returned home to hear offensive music playing and confronted his son. The teen said Yancey hit him and threw his computer keyboard down, according to the report.

    Police charged Yancey with simple assault and battery.

    Although prosecutors dropped both cases, the Georgia Peace Officer Standards and Training Council has an open investigation into Yancey on at least one of the incidents.

    Records from the council, a regulatory body for public safety employees, were not available Wednesday.
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  11. #26
    VIP Member Array mcp1810's Avatar
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    So now it seems the domestics were not between husband and wife. Again, just because a theory fits doesn't make it the truth.......
    If this guys was known to the day laborers in the area for carrying large quantities of cash to pay for supplies and to pay them he could easily have been set up. The truth sometimes is a lot less interesting than what we can imagine. Either way it's a tragedy for the family.
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  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by mcp1810 View Post
    So now it seems the domestics were not between husband and wife. Again, just because a theory fits doesn't make it the truth.......
    If this guys was known to the day laborers in the area for carrying large quantities of cash to pay for supplies and to pay them he could easily have been set up. The truth sometimes is a lot less interesting than what we can imagine. Either way it's a tragedy for the family.
    I don't know too many people that carry a large wad of cash in 50's and hundred dollar bills,In every case of domestic abuse he was charged with his wife called the cops,also if convicted of domestic violence you can never own a gun again which would jeopardise his job as a deputy,If the "robber"killed anybody I would shoot the guy first as they are more of a threat than the woman in most cases,I'm saying theres things that don't make sense.If I was gonna plan a murder I'd make sure I had a good motive like a large wad of cash to throw down next to the guy.
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  13. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by cphilip View Post

    But having been a suspect for a time I had no problem with it at all. That was the least of my problems at the time. I would imagine this officer also thinks the same way. If he is innocent then he is not even thinking about that right now.

    ANYTIME I'm a suspect in a felonious crime I'll have a problem with it. You DON'T have to be guilty to end up going to prison.

  14. #29
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    To me the key might be ... was it really the laborer's gun ? or , a potential 'drop down' gun. That would say a lot. "IF" the laborer had a gun and this gun is tied directly to him, the story becomes more plausible. If not, then .... a whole different matter.

    There are numerous possibilities... maybe he was the jealous type and thought the laborer and his wife was ... uh.. interested in each other, or caught them together and assumed certain things...

    the list could go on and on.... but, who really owned that gun, and how the money really got there.... would answer a lot to me.

  15. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eagleks View Post
    To me the key might be ... was it really the laborer's gun ? or , a potential 'drop down' gun. That would say a lot. "IF" the laborer had a gun and this gun is tied directly to him, the story becomes more plausible. If not, then .... a whole different matter.

    There are numerous possibilities... maybe he was the jealous type and thought the laborer and his wife was ... uh.. interested in each other, or caught them together and assumed certain things...

    the list could go on and on.... but, who really owned that gun, and how the money really got there.... would answer a lot to me.
    If the gun came off of the streets how could it be linked to the work man? It could have been borrowed for a drug dealer etc... or if the deputy planted it, he could have taken it off of a drug dealer in the past and kept it around... it seems convenient for dirty officers to plant guns and drugs around their victims... this sort of thing was happening in a "special" drug investigation type unit in Baltimore city, nothing but corruption took them all to hell and they were planting drugs and guns on people.
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