'Living Scared: A year after Sean Taylor's murder, NFL players still live in fear.'

'Living Scared: A year after Sean Taylor's murder, NFL players still live in fear.'

This is a discussion on 'Living Scared: A year after Sean Taylor's murder, NFL players still live in fear.' within the In the News: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly forums, part of the The Back Porch category; Preface: The following is an excellent cover page main article toward not just matters for high profile persons of criminal interest, but shows how once ...

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Thread: 'Living Scared: A year after Sean Taylor's murder, NFL players still live in fear.'

  1. #1
    VIP Member Array Janq's Avatar
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    'Living Scared: A year after Sean Taylor's murder, NFL players still live in fear.'

    Preface:
    The following is an excellent cover page main article toward not just matters for high profile persons of criminal interest, but shows how once again everyone and _anyone_ regardless of physical size, strength, means, or that they don't happen to live in a 'bad neighborhood' and don't choose to hang around 'bad people'.
    It does not matter. Never has. Never will.

    The concerns, thoughts, and desires these specific persons have are exactly same as most anyone else including ourselves. They just happen to be household names as part and parcel to their career choice.

    ---

    As featured in this months edition of ESPN Magazine:

    Living Scared
    A year after Sean Taylor's murder, NFL players still live in fear.

    by David Fleming



    Jeff Riedel

    Redskins RB Clinton Portis, one of Sean Taylor's close friends, now lives in fear.

    First comes the gate, a heavy metal barrier that halts visitors' cars about 100 feet from Clinton Portis' waterfront condo in Miami. It's manned by a security guard who reaches out from behind thick glass to check the ID of each driver and passenger, while high-tech cameras snap pictures of their faces and license plates, before allowing them to pass. The immaculately groomed grounds of cobblestone and palm trees are fortified with well-disguised cameras by the front door, the loading dock, the concierge desk and the private guest elevator. After navigating past those, plus a metal door secured with a dead bolt and a wall-mounted computerized alarm system, guests are finally allowed entry into Portis' sanctuary in the sky.

    Enjoying a rare weekend off, the NFL's second-leading rusher is on his couch, yawning constantly while watching college football. He's wearing pajama pants, orange footies and a white T-shirt emblazoned with a picture of friend and departed Skins teammate Sean Taylor. Favoring a sore left knee, Portis shuffles across his marble floor to show off the views. To the east, windsurfers ride the glassy waters of the bay. To the west, Miami's skyline. And behind the blinds to the north: another shiny condo tower, where a woman stands on her balcony, peering directly at a startled Portis.

    The moment perfectly captures how NFL players feel these days. On Nov. 26, 2007, Taylor was shot by intruders in the bedroom of his Miami home while his girlfriend and 18-month-old daughter hid under the covers. The botched robbery attempt was another horrific chapter of a crime wave against pro athletes, one that's shocked NFL players into a paradigm shift in self-awareness and security. Yet no matter how closely they protect themselves, many still can't shake the feeling that someone is out there, just beyond the blinds, lurking. "I don't think the NFL is gonna ever be the same," says Portis. "As a football player, Sean thrived on instilling fear in people on the field. Then you wake up in the middle of the night, and you hear something rattling around in your house, and in a split second—now the fear is in you."

    You can see the impact of Taylor's death in the body language of 315-pound Chiefs rookie Branden Albert as he leaves a club, checking and rechecking his rearview mirror to make sure he isn't being followed. It's in the nervous laughter of Steelers QB Ben Roethlisberger when he recalls the time a weapon was waved in his face. It compels Jaguars running back Fred Taylor to use the car with the less showy factory rims when he goes out at night. It's in the candid conversations Titans center Kevin Mawae says happen in every locker room around the league. And it's in the near whisper of Texans cornerback Dunta Robinson as he talks, for the first time publicly, about his own home invasion.

    When asked about their fears, players cite the same frightening flashpoints: New Year's Day 2007, when Broncos defensive back Darrent Williams was shot and killed outside a Denver nightclub while riding in his limo; November 2007, when Taylor was murdered; June 2008, when Oakland receiver Javon Walker was robbed and beaten unconscious near the Vegas strip; and September 2008, when Jaguars lineman Richard Collier was paralyzed and had to have his leg amputated above the knee after he was shot 14 times in what police say was a retaliatory shooting. "We are targets," says Buccaneers corner Ronde Barber. "We need to be aware of that everywhere we go."

    Violence against athletes is not new, of course, and not isolated to the NFL. Just last summer in Chicago, NBA players Antoine Walker and Eddy Curry were robbed in their homes. But more than any other league's, the culture of the NFL—the wealth, fame, brutality and air of invincibility—makes its players vulnerable. Broncos security chief Dave Abrams, who was hired full-time shortly after Williams was shot, says the hardest part of his job is convincing players of their own mortality. To excel at such a violent sport, he explains, they must be fearless; they think of themselves as the kind of untouchable warrior who would never require the protection of a bodyguard, an alarm system or even a locked door. The night he was murdered, Sean Taylor had neglected to turn on his home security system, even though his house had been burglarized just nine days earlier.

    The NFL is attempting to flip this it-can't-happen-to-me mindset. The league provides a security consultant to each team, and most teams also have their own head of security. At his State of the League address before Super Bowl XLII, commissioner Roger Goodell said that players becoming targets was "a big issue." "We have to do everything we can to educate our players of the simple things they can do to protect themselves" Goodell said.

    Portis has gotten the message. Security measures that used to be an afterthought are now part of his daily routine. Alarms that used to go unused are now turned on each night. Doors are dead-bolted. Windows are locked. Others are taking even more drastic steps. Robinson recently became a gun owner. Roethlisberger uses bodyguards for public appearances. Mawae, the NFLPA president, runs background checks on potential babysitters.

    Fred Taylor, meanwhile, has equipped his Jacksonville home with every conceivable security apparatus. "I still don't think I have enough," he says. "Who knows what's enough? I wouldn't say I'm safe.

    "I don't know what safe is."...

    The full story can be found at; Living Scared - ESPN The Magazine

    - Janq
    "Killers who are not deterred by laws against murder are not going to be deterred by laws against guns. " - Robert A. Levy

    "A license to carry a concealed weapon does not make you a free-lance policeman." - Florida Div. of Licensing


  2. #2
    Ex Member Array BikerRN's Avatar
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    All I have to say is, welcome to the real world the rest of us live in.

    To often athletes are "sheltered" from an early age and not allowed to expirience all the day to day things we "normal" people do because they excell at what they do. It starts early, in High School, and maybe even earlier than that for some.

    I do not begrudge them their talent. Very few can excell at their chosen profession. Most of us however learn much earlier what real life is like from day to day living. The skills necessary to excell on the gridion are not the same as needed to excell in day to day living.

    There are many examples of athletes being unprepared for life after the game. Look at the former athletes that get in to tax trouble or go bankrupt. All their life they have prepared for one thing, "the show". After "the show" they are unprepared for the years ahead in most cases.

    Like I said, welcome to normal day to day living. The entire failure is not theirs however. Society and their earlier mentors bear a great responsibility in this failure.

    Biker

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    Quote Originally Posted by Janq View Post
    everyone and _anyone_ regardless of physical size, strength, means, or that they don't happen to live in a 'bad neighborhood' and don't choose to hang around 'bad people'.
    It does not matter. Never has. Never will.
    I wish more of my family and acquaintenances would realize this.

    Quote Originally Posted by David Fleming
    Then you wake up in the middle of the night, and you hear something rattling around in your house, and in a split second—now the fear is in you."
    The fear is much worse when one hasn't planned nor even considered the possibility of such an event. When considered possible, and then actions are taken in preparation, fear may take a back seat to reaction. At least that's the hope and the plan.

    Quote Originally Posted by David Fleming
    ...It compels Jaguars running back Fred Taylor to use the car with the less showy factory rims when he goes out at night.

    "We are targets," says Buccaneers corner Ronde Barber. "We need to be aware of that everywhere we go."

    ...the hardest part of his job is convincing players of their own mortality.

    ..."We have to do everything we can to educate our players of the simple things they can do to protect themselves" Goodell said.
    All of these are principles that are discussed here on DC on a daily basis.

  4. #4
    VIP Member Array stormbringerr's Avatar
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    after finding out the reason some of these guys were shot they might want to stop going to so many nightclubs and getting people mad at them. also work on their attitudes toward regular people.
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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    ― Thomas Paine

  5. #5
    VIP Member Array Janq's Avatar
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    Storm,

    That is touched on in detail in the story by three of the athletes interviewed. One in fact does not roll that way at all and still found himself telling tale of how he was targeted for a broad day invasion bound and gagged in his living room and his children 2 and IIRC 5 were placed into a closet by the invaders and left there with an armed invader to watch over them.

    Agreed very much Grady the principles and concepts and items of thought featured in this article are featured _daily_ at DC.com. Further many of the questions and concerns and lack of understanding and assumptions featured in the athletes individual personal stories and reflections are also discussed here too.
    IMHO this was an excellent piece well written. Not what I would have expected from the source muchless to be oriented toward the audience it is.

    Agreed with BikerRN too.
    These things they state concern toward are nothing new to we regular people and those of us who are not household names.
    This was at least forme a good reminder of how simply unaware people can be not that they are dumb or anything....just flat out unaware.

    - Janq
    "Killers who are not deterred by laws against murder are not going to be deterred by laws against guns. " - Robert A. Levy

    "A license to carry a concealed weapon does not make you a free-lance policeman." - Florida Div. of Licensing

  6. #6
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    Let me take a slightly different tangent here...many of these, so called, 'role model' athletes, are involved with gambling, drugs, broads and boats, dog fighting, and various other illegal activities that involve them with the dark side of life...when you walk on the dark side, you attract trouble.

    I don't wish for anyone to be subject to the work of dirtbags, but sometimes it's in the cosmos for these guys. Many of them think that the laws do not apply to themselves, and their fame and wealth keep many of them free from the punishment that they may deserve.
    Some of these guy can't get a permit for a weapon because of past behavior.

    I certainly do not put them all in the same category, but we have all read about many of their exploits and wrong doings...
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  7. #7
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    Anybody please confirm this. I recall reading somewhere that the NFL forbids its players from owning firearms, IS this correct?
    You have to make the shot when fire is smoking, people are screaming, dogs are barking, kids are crying and sirens are coming.
    Randy Cain.

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  8. #8
    VIP Member Array Janq's Avatar
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    Miggy that was touched on in the article.
    The NFL is not capable of disallowing personal ownership, that would be a violation of Constitutional Rights. But they can and do out right disallow firearms on NFL grounds including parking lots and team places of business. Again it's covered in the article.

    - Janq
    "Killers who are not deterred by laws against murder are not going to be deterred by laws against guns. " - Robert A. Levy

    "A license to carry a concealed weapon does not make you a free-lance policeman." - Florida Div. of Licensing

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    VIP Member Array mcp1810's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miggy View Post
    Anybody please confirm this. I recall reading somewhere that the NFL forbids its players from owning firearms, IS this correct?
    IIRC Sean Taylor had recently purchased a shotgun just before he was killed. Unfortunately it was not accessible/ready when he needed it.
    Infowars- Proving David Hannum right on a daily basis

  10. #10
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    Good post Janq,

    It just goes to show that no one is immune from violence and the craziness that permeates this earth.
    I would rather stand against the cannons of the wicked than against the prayers of the righteous.


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  11. #11
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    Some quotes from the extended article:

    You might go a whole lifetime and not encounter one thing. Or you may encounter 10 things in one weekend. You never know.
    Because even though the league does a lot to educate players about safety, the responsibility is the individual's.
    I've heard the league say you don't need a gun. But if you haven't been in my situation, you really can't answer that question.
    League officials tell us we need to take measures to protect ourselves. But the NFL says we can't have guns in the facility, even in the parking lot. Crooks know this. They can just sit back and wait for us to drive off, knowing we won't have anything in our vehicle from point A to point B.
    So the league tells the players they are responsible for their own safety, yet the league doesn't allow them to be armed on the drive to and from work.

    The article has some good info relating to security, situational awareness, and not putting oneself in dangerous situations. Several players acknowledged having a gun for home protection.

    The low-profile players are not that much different than some of the rest of us in their concerns for security, other than their higher noteriety and bigger paychecks. The flashier players, well, they are different than me in that they are exposing themselves and their money in places I wouldn't go. I'm not saying they don't have a right to do so; I'm just saying I wouldn't be as flashy with my cash and possessions.

    Some of the players do understand the limitations of the league and the police as far as the players' personal protection.

    The article also contains some good advice about simple security measures, and using the security measures you already own.

  12. #12
    VIP Member Array Janq's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mcp1810 View Post
    IIRC Sean Taylor had recently purchased a shotgun just before he was killed. Unfortunately it was not accessible/ready when he needed it.
    No MCP, he had a felony and was not lawfully allowed to own, possess, or have access to a firearm.
    He did though as reported have a machete type long blade in his bedroom which he left behind for his wife...as they hid under the covers.

    - Janq
    "Killers who are not deterred by laws against murder are not going to be deterred by laws against guns. " - Robert A. Levy

    "A license to carry a concealed weapon does not make you a free-lance policeman." - Florida Div. of Licensing

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