What am I missing from my BOB?

What am I missing from my BOB?

This is a discussion on What am I missing from my BOB? within the Off Topic & Humor Discussion forums, part of the The Back Porch category; I have put together a BOB that consists of two army duffle bags. Is there anything I am missing or any items I listed that ...

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Thread: What am I missing from my BOB?

  1. #1
    Distinguished Member Array ErnieNWillis's Avatar
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    What am I missing from my BOB?

    I have put together a BOB that consists of two army duffle bags. Is there anything I am missing or any items I listed that are unneccessary?

    1 MULTI-TOOL
    2 FLASH LIGHTS (2 MINIMUM)
    3 HUNTING KNIFE
    4 WATER (3 DAYS SUPPLY)
    5 WATER PUTIFICATION TABLETS
    6 CANNED FOODS & DRIED BEEF
    7 SHELTER (2 TWO PERSON TENTS)
    8 BLANKETS
    9 1ST AID KIT & RX MEDS
    10 EXTRA BATTERIES
    11 CASH (MINIMUM $1000.00 DIFFERENT DENOMINATIONS)
    12 ROPE
    13 MINI FISHING KIT
    14 FIREARM(S)
    15 SPARE AMMO & MAGAZINES
    16 HAND CRANK AM/FM RADIO
    17 2-WAY RADIOS
    18 AREA MAP
    19 CANTEENS
    20 FOLDING SHOVEL
    21 LEATHER WORK GLOVES
    22 WATER PROOF MATCHES
    23 ZIPPO W/ CAN OF FLUID
    24 ROAD FLARES
    25 GAS MASK
    26 LOAD BEARING EQUIPMENT
    27 ANTI-BACTERIAL LOTION
    28 US ARMY FIELD MANUAL


  2. #2
    VIP Member Array jwhite75's Avatar
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    Chem lights, towels, fire starter, such as magnesium and striker, and tinder like a ziploc baggie full of dryer lint. Soap, baby wipes. Poncho/waterproof clothing (jacket and pants if you can), and comfortable all purpose hiking shoes boots. preferably waterproof, and a change of clothes and socks/underwear. Seasonal warm gloves , and hat
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  3. #3
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    (From: When Technology Fails)


    Consider placing all of the following items in your 72-hour survival kit:

    Portable radio, preferably one that works with dead batteries, or no batteries at all, such as one with a hand generator crank or solar cells (available through survival and surplus outlets).

    First aid kit with first aid and survival handbooks . I suggest a small compact first aid kit for mini Grab-And run kits and a more comprehensive first aid kit ( for your plastic tub containing optional materials that you can toss into your car.


    Water, water purification chemicals, and/or purifying filter. Enough to provide one gallon per person per day . Retort (foil) pouches can handle freezing in a car trunk, but most other water containers can’t handle freezing without the potential for bursting. Three gallons per person is heavy (24 lbs), so I strongly suggest that you include a water filter and water treatment chemicals. I suggest pump type back country filters, such as those made by Katadyn or MSR, that are rated to filter out all bacteria and have a carbon core to remove toxic chemicals, bad tastes and odors. Boiling kills all bacteria and viruses but is not always an option and does nothing to remove toxic chemicals, bad tastes and odors. Also, supplement your filter(s) with purifying iodine crystals (or other chemicals), such as a “Polar Pure” water purification kit, to kill all viruses that may not be removed by filters. Pump filters that are rated for virus removal have tiny pore sizes and tend to clog quickly (a clogged filter is worthless).

    Waterproof and windproof matches in a waterproof container, and a utility-type butane (large, with extended tip) lighter. I also like to include a compact magnesium rod type fire starter, which is water proof and will light hundreds of fires with just a knife to scrape against the magnesium bar and its flint sparker.

    Wool or pile blankets (avoid cotton) because they are warm when wet, or a sleeping bag. A heat-reflective, waterproof “space blanket” is a good emergency type item in a compact kit. Fiber-pile, mountaineering-quality sleeping bags are great, if you have the room for it (no down sleeping bags, because they are worthless if wet).

    Flashlight with spare batteries, or solar recharge flashlight. I highly recommend that you purchase a headlamp with LED bulbs. Headlamps leave your hands free to carry things or fix things. LED bulbs use a fraction of the power, are far more shock resistant, and last far longer than traditional light bulbs so your batteries last many times longer.

    Candles (useful for lighting fires with damp wood) and a couple light sticks (emergency light when nothing else works or explosive gases are present).


    Toiletries, including toilet paper (store in water proof zip lock bag), toothbrush, soap, razor, shampoo, sanitary napkins (also good for severe bleeding wounds), several packs of dental floss (for tying things), sun screen, extra eyeglasses, diapers, and so on.


    Food for three days per person, minimum. Use foods you will eat, and that store well, such as nuts, sport bars, canned vegetables, fruits, meats, dry cereals, and military type preserved meals (available at surplus and survival stores). Freeze dried back packing foods are lightest, but only work if you have a stove for hot water.


    A Swiss army knife, or a stainless steel multi-tool knife (Leatherman), with scissors, can opener, blades, and screwdrivers.
    Map, compass, and whistle. When you are in a weakened state, or have a parched throat, a whistle may draw someone’s attention and save your life. In smoke or fog, a compass may be the only thing pointing you in the right direction. I like to keep my compass on a string so I can hang it around my neck for easy reference in confusing situations (darkness, fog, smoke, etc.)


    Sewing kit with extra–heavy-duty thread and at least two extra heavy duty needles. Should be strong enough to stitch a torn strap onto your backpack. A “Speedy Stitching Awl” works great for heavy duty repairs.

    Towel or dishcloth.

    Knives, forks, spoons, and so on. A camping “mess kit” is a compact set of utensils.

    Tent and/or roll of plastic sheeting for shelter. I use a poncho

    Extra clothing, such as long underwear, hat, jacket, waterproof mittens, leather work gloves, rain coat or poncho, sturdy boots, and so on. Remember, cotton is almost worthless when wet, but wool and specialty outdoor clothing (usually polyester) wicks moisture and is warm when wet.

    Entertainment for kids and other special needs (prescription medicines, diapers, extra glasses, etc.). I have two small sons.

    50 feet of heavy duty nylon string or light rope.

    Record of bank numbers and important telephone numbers.

    Spare checks and cash.

    Optional Items :
    I suggest you keep the following items in one handy location so you can add them to your “Grab-And-Run” kit if you have the time, space, and need in your particular situation:

    Compact camping stove for boiling water and cooking food. I personally like the back country multi-fuel stoves by MSR. Remember to store a spare fuel bottle too!



    A more comprehensive first aid kit than you would normally carry on your back into the backcountry.

    In major metro areas where terrorism is a concern, or rural areas where wildfires are a concern, I suggest you include a painter’s respirator with activated carbon filter canisters, or a gas mask, for filtering out smoke and/or noxious fumes. Painter’s respirators are not very expensive and can be found at any large hardware store or builder’s supply house (Home Depot, Lowes, etc.). Gas masks can be found at army surplus or survival outlets.

    25 kitchen-size garbage bags and sewage treatment chemicals (powdered type preferred) for garbage and toilet sewage. A few large hefty bags can double for raincoats, ground cloths, and shelter. I usually skip the sewage treatment chemicals (lime, etc.), but if you live in an urban area with major earthquake or terrorist potential, it is probably a good idea to have some lime on hand to cut the smell of human waste.

    TIP: If you are not a seasoned outdoors type person, I suggest that you begin to practice outdoor skills with a little car camping and follow that with some easy back packing. There is nothing like carrying all your gear on your back for a few days in the woods to teach you what really counts and what you can easily do without. The skills you learn in the back country will make surviving a disaster much easier, and more comfortable, and may help save the lives of your friends and family. Your local back country specialty store can provide you with all the gear you need, plus books and basic instructions to get you started. Additionally, you can attend one of many different backcountry schools to learn these skills in a safe well supervised environment (NOLS, Outward Bound, etc.)
    “You can sway a thousand men by appealing to their prejudices quicker than you can convince one man by logic.”

    ― Robert A. Heinlein,

  4. #4
    Member Array UnklFungus's Avatar
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    I would add scent free baby wipes, toothpaste/brush and deodorant, maybe some unscented talcum or corn starch in case of heat rash or chafing.
    “The Constitution is not an instrument for the government to restrain the people, it is an instrument for the people to restrain the government.”

    Patrick Henry
    Quote Originally Posted by UnklFungus
    If it is ok to disarm legal citizens to reduce crime, then doesn't it stand to disband the military to prevent war?

  5. #5
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    Good post pgrass101
    -Bark'n
    Semper Fi


    "The gun is the great equalizer... For it is the gun, that allows the meek to repel the monsters; Whom are bigger, stronger and without conscience, prey on those who without one, would surely perish."

  6. #6
    Senior Member Array jhh3rd's Avatar
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    I had a friend who kept a BOB when he was married. Tampons.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Array 1911PKR's Avatar
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    Yeppers.... you forgot the Jack Daniels. You're gonna NEED that!
    "Success is how high you bounce when you hit bottom" Gen. George Patton

  8. #8
    Distinguished Member Array ErnieNWillis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1911PKR View Post
    Yeppers.... you forgot the Jack Daniels. You're gonna NEED that!


    Your are absolutely right about that. I may need to add another duffle bag.

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