Anyone collecting Social Security Disability Income?

This is a discussion on Anyone collecting Social Security Disability Income? within the Off Topic & Humor Discussion forums, part of the The Back Porch category; I just had a question for anyone currently on social security disability income. I feel much older just asking this because I'm only 25 years ...

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Thread: Anyone collecting Social Security Disability Income?

  1. #1
    Distinguished Member Array SubNine's Avatar
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    Anyone collecting Social Security Disability Income?

    I just had a question for anyone currently on social security disability income.

    I feel much older just asking this because I'm only 25 years old.

    I've posted a few threads regarding my physical condition in the past and it has slowly gotten worse over these past few years. I've been denied Medicaid and I am certain I will be denied coverage for any pre-existing conditions that I have, because thats just how insurance companies work, putting money before lives.

    I am limited on what jobs I can do and finding a job that is easy on my legs has been much easier said than done. As I continue to get older I know my condition will get worse and it might take an ER visit with a slipped hip joint again to get the attention of a surgeon that I need a hip replacement.

    Anyway I applied for SSI last week and the only thing I received so far in reply was a form to release medical records and had to get a witness to sign it. I'm just wondering how long this whole process takes. I imagine it takes awhile but how long exactly?

    For those of you who have no idea what I'm talking about I was diagnosed with

    Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis at age 11 and to make a long story short it didn't heal right.


    This is what happened to my left hip at age 11


    I had an x-ray done back in 2006 which was four years ago and it doesn't look as bad as the illustration above but I believe as I get older, and I continue to walk on whats left of my left hip joint it'll start to resemble that illustration. It probably has gotten worse since my last x-ray. The pain has been picking up again these past few weeks. I don't like the idea of going to a doctor and getting stuck with another medical bill, because more than likely I'll be given a prescription for pain killers and be let go. This has happened several times when I went for a consultation on getting a hip replacement when I was still on my parents insurance.

    Anyway if anyone can answer my question of how long it takes to find out if I'm approved or denied for SSI, please let me know!

    Thanks!
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  3. #2
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    I am not sure about SSI but I do receive Social Disability pay as a result of stroke some years ago causing continued problems. As far as applying for disability I had to be unable to work for one year before I was eligible to apply. Once that requirement was met I was sent to a SSA approved doctor for evaluation and then submitted paperwork. I was denied twice and offered an appeal before a judge. After hiring a lawyer we went before the judge where I was granted disability. Once the disability pay is granted pay is retroactive to the initial application date, they do withhold an escrow to pay the lawyer fees (25% max $4000).
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    The requirements for soc. security disability are quite stringent. OP mentioned SSI, and I think that is something different from disability.

    Since you are quite young you really need to seeking a job that you are able to do.

    I don't want to sound harsh or judgmental, I am sympathetic, but if you are able to sit in a chair and type, there is something you can do. It may not pay a lot, it may take work to figure it out or to find the position, and it might be boring. But you can do something useful.

    The biggest hurdle for most people in the work world (myself included when I was still working) is somehow finding a job that matches up with who you are. It is hard, it takes luck too, but it can be done.

    Clearly you have some computer skills, typing skills, and writing skills. Somewhere out there you will find a job you can do while sitting.

    In my old job we had a senior procurement/contracting specialist who was totally confined to a wheel chair. I don't know his education, but I think it was mostly on the job training and little post-HS. By all accounts he was one of the better people in that department to deal with.

    Again, I'm not unsympathetic, and in this economy even really healthy 25 y.o. people have severe trouble finding jobs. All I am saying is don't treat yourself as a hopeless case when you almost certainly do have real opportunities.

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    Member Array gilfo's Avatar
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    Took a few months to find out I was denied. When you get the letter of denial, contact a lawyer and let them handle it. Took almost 2 years but I finally got it with a retro check of 30 thousand. Quite sweet.
    Good luck and don't give up.

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    There is a big difference between SSI and SSDI. I don't know all the in's and outs of it, but I think you have to have worked at least 40 continuous quarters of full time work to be eligible for SSDI (Disability).

    Try to figure out as much as you can about Social Security. And take my work for it, DOCUMENT everything. Every visit to your Social Security Office, Every discussion you have with them, including the name, time and date of each encounter. Make copies of every form you fill out and return. EVERYTHING!

    Two thing to remember, 1, The people at Social Security are low tier government employees. 2, They love paper work, the more you give them the easier your journey will be.

    Familiarize yourself with the Red Book. That"s the SS Disability Bible.

    Best of luck.
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    Mine was easy,I broke my neck,have lots of problems,walking standing pain etc.I applied and I forgot about it,about 6 months later I got a letter that my check would be coming and I received a check for 6 months back pay and monthly checks based on my earned income
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    Wish you the best! It's a real shame they couldn't have fixed this while you were on your parents insurance.
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    Distinguished Member Array SubNine's Avatar
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    If I had it my way I'd be somewhere overseas serving my country. Not one day goes by where I don't wish I could join the military. Finding a job in the civilian world is extremely difficult, and I can't even so much as get an interview.

    Well I'll do what I can to stay in school and after I graduate hopefully I can land a position that allows me to use my degree.

    Thanks for the info everyone!
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    Binder And Binder

    Call them from the start. You might get approved right away. Go with them if you get disapproved it could take years in the appeal process. SS will fight you and make you drown you in paperwork to discourage you.
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    re: SubNine select college courses carefully

    Quote Originally Posted by SubNine View Post
    after I graduate hopefully I can land a position that allows me to use my degree.

    Thanks for the info everyone!
    Please be very careful about selecting what you study so that you can indeed get a job with whatever degree you earn. Too many young people get college degrees which do not contain a job training/career component, or which are going to give one a very limited type of career path.

    Picking what you study carefully is more important than picking your bride. You can divorce a bad one. You can't get rid of a worthless degree. This is especially true with the higher ones at the MS and PhD level. You get stuck with that degree being part of your identity.

    So, select your course of study carefully with a fully open eye on job potential.

    As you are confined to what you can do physically, be sure that the sort of job you might be able to use your degree to obtain is also one where you can work with limited mobility. Perhaps accounting; perhaps some aspects of mechanical engineering or electrical transmission design engineering. Certainly various aspects of programming, though competition is fierce.

    In any case, only you can chose for yourself. It has to be something you like (or you won't be able to learn it) and it has to be something which will help you with your future job hunting, taking your disability into consideration.

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    Sympathies. My wife has many medical issues and can't work. She FINALLY went a few months ago to check on benefits and was told NOPE you should have applied sooner. Oh and if you have another child you will qualify. WHAT? I'm drowning in medical bills and paying taxes so somebody else can get by. GRRRR!!
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  13. #12
    Distinguished Member Array SubNine's Avatar
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    My degree will be in Medical Insurance Billing.
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    Member Array TheChief94's Avatar
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    I applied for SSDI dating from November of 2001; it was (finally) approved in May of 2004 after two denials and getting a lawyer involved. As has been mentioned earlier, get a notebook, document EVERY encounter (including time, date, name of person spoken with, subject discussed, etc), get your medical records, and keep at them! Leave nothing to chance - we basically "drowned" them with paperwork to the point the Administrative Law Judge cut my hearing short after 8 minutes because he "had everything he needed."

    Good luck to you, SubNine, hope things go well for you!
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    ok, i'll give you the inside scoop. let's just say, I've been trained on this stuff.

    first off, you will probably get denied. at 25 years old, you pretty much need to be confined to a wheelchair in order to be considered disabled under social security rules. if you are severely depressed, that can help.

    if you require a wheelchair, get your doctor to say so, in writing. actually, get your doctor to carefully document all your work restrictions as clearly as possible. for instance "he can only sit for 1 hour at a time, he can stand for less than one hour. he can lift no more than 20 pounds occasionally or 10 pounds frequently.....etc"
    your doctor's word goes a loooooonnng way. especially if it is sufficiently supported by medical evidence (x-rays showing your impairment, limited range of motion, limited strength). getting your doctor to say "my patient is disabled" will not help.

    if you are depressed, don't be afraid to include all the details, as well as fully disclosing your symptoms to your doctor.

    again, you will probably get denied. a lot of people are under the impression that social security has a policy to deny every first time applicant. this is not true. what is true is that social security's denial rate runs somewhere around 73%. the younger you are, the more likely it is that you will be denied.

    appeals do get allowed more often, but they take FOREVER (around 2 years) and usually you end up giving up to 30% of your benefit to your attorney, which is an enormous waste of money.

    SSI is based on income and resources, so you just need to be broke to be able to apply, and if you get it, you are automatically awarded medicaid.

    SSDI is based on your past earnings and at 25 years old, you probably don't have enough quarters to qualify. if you do get allowed, you are eligible for medicare in 2 years.

    its not the Red Book that you want, its called the Blue Book. it is a book that outlines exactly how impairments are to be evaluated under social security rules. its called the blue book, or "the listings book"

    the listing that applies to your impairment is as follows
    1.00 Musculoskeletal System-Adult Major dysfunction of a joint(s) (due to any cause)

    "1.02 Major dysfunction of a joint(s) (due to any cause): Characterized by gross anatomical deformity (e.g., subluxation, contracture, bony or fibrous ankylosis, instability) and chronic joint pain and stiffness with signs of limitation of motion or other abnormal motion of the affected joint(s), and findings on appropriate medically acceptable imaging of joint space narrowing, bony destruction, or ankylosis of the affected joint(s). With:

    A. Involvement of one major peripheral weight-bearing joint (i.e., hip, knee, or ankle), resulting in inability to ambulate effectively, as defined in 1.00B2b;

    OR

    B. Involvement of one major peripheral joint in each upper extremity (i.e., shoulder, elbow, or wrist-hand), resulting in inability to perform fine and gross movements effectively, as defined in 1.00B2c."

    the bolded part is the part that applies to you. your ability to ambulate effectively means, basically, can you stand and walk for at least 2 hours at a time, can you walk without assistive devices (cane, crutches, etc), can you navigate uneven terrain and can you walk up and down a few stairs.

    if you cannot do that stuff, get your doctor to say so and explain why, and you will have a much better shot of getting a favorable decision.

    you will be sent a form documenting your daily activities. be very detailed. everything you say must be considered in the evaluation of your impairments. the more detail you give, the harder it is for the disability examiner to explain away the severity of your impairment.

    you said you don't go to the doctor because you cant afford it. this may hurt your case because you don't have a good history of your impairment. however, this means you will probably get sent to an appointment by social security. when you have this appointment, be as detailed as possible about how you are restricted by your impairment. dont be a cry baby, just be clear and to the point. "i cannot stand for more than an hour", "I cannot lift more than 15 pounds without joint instability" stuff like that. he will examine you to find out how well you can walk, what your flexibility is, how stable your joint is, how much weight you can bear, etc.

    all states operate under the same rules, but every state applies the rules just a little bit differently, so if you know 50 different people who applied in 50 different states, there will be 50 different accounts of how fairly they were treated. inconsistent application of the rules is par for the course.

    if you get denied, request a copy of your file, read it carefully and find out exactly why you were denied. then get more evidence to support your case and apply again. that will be the fastest way to get allowed. unless you can afford to wait 2 years for an appeal.

    you will bug the hell out of your disability examiner if you call them everyday. so don't do it. but do respond to all mail promptly and do ask questions if anything is really unclear. make sure you have submitted every piece of evidence that supports your case.


    all that to say, social security disability is a crappy way to support yourself because the money is so slim. so only pursue this if you really cannot work. it really is more beneficial to find some job out there that pays $9/hr if you can.


    pm me if you have any questions. i'll try to answer them the best i can

  16. #15
    Distinguished Member Array SubNine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bomber View Post
    ok, i'll give you the inside scoop. let's just say, I've been trained on this stuff.

    first off, you will probably get denied. at 25 years old, you pretty much need to be confined to a wheelchair in order to be considered disabled under social security rules. if you are severely depressed, that can help.

    if you require a wheelchair, get your doctor to say so, in writing. actually, get your doctor to carefully document all your work restrictions as clearly as possible. for instance "he can only sit for 1 hour at a time, he can stand for less than one hour. he can lift no more than 20 pounds occasionally or 10 pounds frequently.....etc"
    your doctor's word goes a loooooonnng way. especially if it is sufficiently supported by medical evidence (x-rays showing your impairment, limited range of motion, limited strength). getting your doctor to say "my patient is disabled" will not help.

    if you are depressed, don't be afraid to include all the details, as well as fully disclosing your symptoms to your doctor.

    again, you will probably get denied. a lot of people are under the impression that social security has a policy to deny every first time applicant. this is not true. what is true is that social security's denial rate runs somewhere around 73%. the younger you are, the more likely it is that you will be denied.

    appeals do get allowed more often, but they take FOREVER (around 2 years) and usually you end up giving up to 30% of your benefit to your attorney, which is an enormous waste of money.

    SSI is based on income and resources, so you just need to be broke to be able to apply, and if you get it, you are automatically awarded medicaid.

    SSDI is based on your past earnings and at 25 years old, you probably don't have enough quarters to qualify. if you do get allowed, you are eligible for medicare in 2 years.

    its not the Red Book that you want, its called the Blue Book. it is a book that outlines exactly how impairments are to be evaluated under social security rules. its called the blue book, or "the listings book"

    the listing that applies to your impairment is as follows
    1.00 Musculoskeletal System-Adult Major dysfunction of a joint(s) (due to any cause)

    "1.02 Major dysfunction of a joint(s) (due to any cause): Characterized by gross anatomical deformity (e.g., subluxation, contracture, bony or fibrous ankylosis, instability) and chronic joint pain and stiffness with signs of limitation of motion or other abnormal motion of the affected joint(s), and findings on appropriate medically acceptable imaging of joint space narrowing, bony destruction, or ankylosis of the affected joint(s). With:

    A. Involvement of one major peripheral weight-bearing joint (i.e., hip, knee, or ankle), resulting in inability to ambulate effectively, as defined in 1.00B2b;

    OR

    B. Involvement of one major peripheral joint in each upper extremity (i.e., shoulder, elbow, or wrist-hand), resulting in inability to perform fine and gross movements effectively, as defined in 1.00B2c."

    the bolded part is the part that applies to you. your ability to ambulate effectively means, basically, can you stand and walk for at least 2 hours at a time, can you walk without assistive devices (cane, crutches, etc), can you navigate uneven terrain and can you walk up and down a few stairs.

    if you cannot do that stuff, get your doctor to say so and explain why, and you will have a much better shot of getting a favorable decision.

    you will be sent a form documenting your daily activities. be very detailed. everything you say must be considered in the evaluation of your impairments. the more detail you give, the harder it is for the disability examiner to explain away the severity of your impairment.

    you said you don't go to the doctor because you cant afford it. this may hurt your case because you don't have a good history of your impairment. however, this means you will probably get sent to an appointment by social security. when you have this appointment, be as detailed as possible about how you are restricted by your impairment. dont be a cry baby, just be clear and to the point. "i cannot stand for more than an hour", "I cannot lift more than 15 pounds without joint instability" stuff like that. he will examine you to find out how well you can walk, what your flexibility is, how stable your joint is, how much weight you can bear, etc.

    all states operate under the same rules, but every state applies the rules just a little bit differently, so if you know 50 different people who applied in 50 different states, there will be 50 different accounts of how fairly they were treated. inconsistent application of the rules is par for the course.

    if you get denied, request a copy of your file, read it carefully and find out exactly why you were denied. then get more evidence to support your case and apply again. that will be the fastest way to get allowed. unless you can afford to wait 2 years for an appeal.

    you will bug the hell out of your disability examiner if you call them everyday. so don't do it. but do respond to all mail promptly and do ask questions if anything is really unclear. make sure you have submitted every piece of evidence that supports your case.


    all that to say, social security disability is a crappy way to support yourself because the money is so slim. so only pursue this if you really cannot work. it really is more beneficial to find some job out there that pays $9/hr if you can.


    pm me if you have any questions. i'll try to answer them the best i can
    Sounds like a royal PITA. I'm usually not the type of person that can argue over the phone or in person, I tend to argue my case in writing much better. I can work but I'm just limited on what type of work I can do. All the administrative positions I've applied for require actual work experience which I have none of.

    I do not want to go to another doctor to be examined if I don't have to because then I'll be stuck with another medical bill that I simply cannot afford to pay. I just love how we pay the government quickly but when it comes to them giving back, they are so darn slow.

    I'll just keep doing the best I can with finding a job I can do.
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