"Never let a good crisis go to waste"

"Never let a good crisis go to waste"

This is a discussion on "Never let a good crisis go to waste" within the Off Topic & Humor Discussion forums, part of the The Back Porch category; FAA orders re-registration of thousands of private aircraft We've got to keep everybody safe! The Federal Aviation Administration says registration records for as many as ...

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Thread: "Never let a good crisis go to waste"

  1. #1
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    "Never let a good crisis go to waste"

    FAA orders re-registration of thousands of private aircraft

    We've got to keep everybody safe!

    The Federal Aviation Administration says registration records for as many as one-third of all private aircraft are out-of-date and inaccurate, and has begun the process of re-registering aircraft in the United States -- a task made more urgent by the threat posed by criminals and terrorists.

    Of the 357,000 registered aircraft in the United States, records for about 119,000 are believed to be out of date, with many of them believed to be junked or inactive aircraft, the FAA said.

    But the inaccurate records also could conceal criminal or even terrorist activity, say some security and aviation experts, who say it is critical that the FAA restore order to its records.

    To deal with the disarray, the FAA is in the process of canceling registration for all civil aircraft -- a category that includes virtually everything except military aircraft -- and requiring the owners to re-register. The re-registrations will be phased-in over three years, and aircraft owners will be required to renew the registrations every three years thereafter.

    "These improvements will give us more up-to-date registration data and better information about the state of the aviation industry," FAA Administrator Randy Babbitt said in July, when the rule took effect.

    The FAA has long grappled with getting a handle on its records, in recent years requiring owners to report the sale of aircraft, the scrapping or destruction of aircraft, or a change in mailing address. But many owners have not complied with those requirements, the FAA said. And many aircraft owners do not voluntarily update the database with other information, it said.

    The FAA's database identifies each aircraft by its registration number -- or "N" number, which is displayed on the plane's tail or fuselage -- its complete description, and the name and address of its registered owner.

    In seeking to upgrade the requirement three years ago, the FAA noted that various levels of law enforcement use the database in drug smuggling investigations and "their efforts now have expanded to include matters of homeland security."

    Proper records can assist investigators, aviation and security. Authorities routinely check the "N" number, or tail number, of suspicious planes, or planes that have entered restricted airspace.

    Just as importantly, an accurate database can help the FAA notify aircraft owners of safety-related information, such as Airworthiness Directives.

    The incomplete records are a security concern, but probably not a security problem," said Chris Dancy, a spokesman for the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association.

    "Most of these planes are probably right where they're supposed to be. The FAA has just lost track of them through lost paperwork or the database not being updated or the owners not answering the triennial survey that the FAA sends out," Dancy said.

    "So they're probably where they are supposed to be -- owned by the people the FAA last has record of. They just don't know that."

    Dancy said most aircraft owners recognize the need for accurate records, and that AOPA has tried to minimize the inconveniences associated with re-registration.

    "We offered some suggestions when the (new requirement was proposed) to try to make it a little less burdensome. But the fact of the matter is that the database is woefully out of date. It does need to be brought up to date. We thought it could be done without canceling current registrations. The FAA decided canceling was the best way. It's now the law of the land," he said.
    We're all in favor of reducing violent crime. It's just that pro-gunners have a method that is proven effective. Anti-gunners don't.
    ---
    John Moses Browning day is January 24th, 2011


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    VIP Member Array JonInNY's Avatar
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    Yes, heard about that. That's strange. It's very hard, if not impossible to get registration for an aircraft without going through the database. And the aircraft is not considered legal without the registration in the plane at all times.

    If anyone is interested, the registry database is here:

    http://registry.faa.gov/aircraftinquiry/
    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch; Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote."
    -- Benjamin Franklin

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    That is a LOT of planes.

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    VIP Member Array mcp1810's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1 old 0311 View Post
    That is a LOT of planes.
    Not really. Compared to the number of cars, trucks, and motorcycles that is nothing. Texas alone was supposed to have over seventeen million registered motor vehicles in 2007.
    Infowars- Proving David Hannum right on a daily basis

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    VIP Member Array JonInNY's Avatar
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    Yes, my plane is registered and in the database. So, I guess no one needs to worry about me. LOL.
    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch; Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote."
    -- Benjamin Franklin

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    The FAA actually HAS most of the data it needs, it's just not doing a good job of cross-referencing files. Any maintenance (including annual inspections) on a flyable aircraft has to be signed off and recorded by an FAA-certified mechanic, and voluminous records are kept. A secondary source ("show me the money") is local/state tax records... you can bet your sweet bippy those people keep accurate records!

    Once again the ineptitude of the federal bureaucracy reminds me of Will Rogers' line, "thank goodness we don't get ALL the government we pay for."
    Smitty
    NRA Endowment Member
    NROI Chief Range Officer

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