Snow Folks in the Real North: Advice Needed Please!

Snow Folks in the Real North: Advice Needed Please!

This is a discussion on Snow Folks in the Real North: Advice Needed Please! within the Off Topic & Humor Discussion forums, part of the The Back Porch category; I am tentatively looking at some snow plow options. I am trying to keep the cost down, and minimize PITA factor, weight, cost and the ...

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Thread: Snow Folks in the Real North: Advice Needed Please!

  1. #1
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    Array Rock and Glock's Avatar
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    Question Snow Folks in the Real North: Advice Needed Please!

    I am tentatively looking at some snow plow options. I am trying to keep the cost down, and minimize PITA factor, weight, cost and the like. I would only use the around my house and acreage. The average annual snow fall is only about 60 inches. I would not use this for any other purpose.

    Snow Plows for Trucks - SnowSport® Heavy Duty Snow Plow

    Does anyone up in real snow country, or otherwise, have any experience with this rig? Thoughts, ideas? Do's? Don'ts? Avoid? Great?

    Thanks!


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  2. #2
    Member Array gilliland87's Avatar
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    I have no personal experience with the plow you asked about but it raises a couple of odd fealings for me. The first is the single attachment point instead of 2 points spread between the frame rails on your truck. I would be real worried about breakage and the "push" you would get running that plow at an angle. The face design also makes me wonder about how it would actually clear the snow on a longer push. For light home use on a single driveway with light to medium pack it would probably work but if you get a heavy wet snow over 2-3 inches it would probably have you frustrated by the end of the job.

  3. #3
    VIP Member Array Guantes's Avatar
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    I have no experience with that particular rig, but something similar, in that it was a single mount.

    When I first moved up here I did not have the money to spend on a factory rig, so I built my own to fit into the front receiver on my 454 Power Wagon. I bought an 84" shaped blade and welded a frame for it to fit into my front receiver. The blade was welded at a fixed angle. Incorporated into the frame was an air shock, with the controls for it in the cab. I would load my compressor in the truck bed and fill its tank. That would allow me to raise and lower the blade. My driveway was about two hundred yards long. This served me well for several years. Our average snowfall is around 72 inches.

    I did not allow the snow to get more than four to six inches before plowing and I took it relatively slow and easy, not attempting to power through it but letting the plow angle move it. If you work within the capabilities of your equipment, you can often accomplish quite a bit.

    I don't know how much help this will be to you, but there it is.
    "I do what I do." Cpl 'coach' Bowden, "Southern Comfort".

  4. #4
    VIP Member Array Sticks's Avatar
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    A plow is a plow. Lots of options out there for bells and whistles.

    More importantly is the unit that is pushing it.

    Front suspension, frame, transmission and driveline. Plowing snow is absolute hell on the vehicle. It's like rear ending a compact car every time you hit a bank, or windrow. Even heavy equipment (loaders, graders, skidsteers) take a lot of damage in just one season. Stress fractures, worn pins and bushings...

    I am a big Dodge truck proponent, right up to plowing snow with it, at least with the diesels. The front end weight limit is nearly maxed with the Cummins alone, then once you throw a plow on the front, your max in cab capacity (occupancy & gear) is somewhere around 250#.

    Take a lot of time to look at the design and specs of your plow vehicle, and cost of repairs for things like ball joints, steering components, U-joints, and peak HP and TQ limits for the transmission (since you will be maxing it out). Autos are preferred for some reason, and I can guarantee you that your detents for P, R, N, & D, will be gone within a season. The newer electronic shift autos are less susceptible to damage from mid shifting, particularly the Allison (will not change directions in the transmission until all movement has stopped). Unfortunately you are limited to a Chevy/GMC in the standard pickups (1500 - 3500) which I would not recommend for this work, or step up to medium duty (5500 - 7500).

    NOTE - I am not a snow plow guy, this is only the perspective from a mechanic that works on equipment subject to this abuse.
    Sticks

    Grasseater // Grass~eat~er noun, often attributive \ˈgras-ē-tər\
    A person who is incapable of independent thought; a person who is herd animal-like in behavior; one who cannot distinguish between right and wrong; a foolish person.
    See also Sheep

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    Member Array chp1911's Avatar
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    I plow for a living in the winter here in "real snow" country. We average around 100 inches a year at the airport,but easily get 250 inches in the snow belt. dont waste your time with a homeowner style plow it will not last! Look into a base model from any of the major manufacturers(Boss, Western,Fisher, Snowdogg,Hiniker) You will pay about Twice as much as the unit that you looking at now but it will be worth the investment in the long run. I have a 7'6" Boss Vee blade on my short bed Chevy that i have been using for the last 5 years with very limited hasseles.Any 3/4 or 1 ton truck will work for what you want to do. stay away from diesels there is no real advantage and LOTS of disadvantages. I was a mechanic for over 25 years so i also have seen the issues that come up with breakage most of which are caused by abuse due to lack of knowledge on how to properly plow. Look up SIMA on the web, there are thousands of people who do this for a living and they have a wealth of info to share. your detents will be just fine as long as you do not"ratchet shift" from foward to reverse and back

  6. #6
    VIP Member Array Sticks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chp1911 View Post
    ...the issues that come up with breakage most of which are caused by abuse due to lack of knowledge on how to properly plow. Look up SIMA on the web, there are thousands of people who do this for a living and they have a wealth of info to share. your detents will be just fine as long as you do not"ratchet shift" from foward to reverse and back
    This ^^^^^^^^^^

    That is what I was trying to convey. I really need to stay away from giving advice before caffeine.
    Sticks

    Grasseater // Grass~eat~er noun, often attributive \ˈgras-ē-tər\
    A person who is incapable of independent thought; a person who is herd animal-like in behavior; one who cannot distinguish between right and wrong; a foolish person.
    See also Sheep

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